Eastwood Chatter

  • Another way to Get Perfect Panel Gaps- With TC Penick

    As Kevin pointed out, trying to build up the edge of a door panel with body filler is not a durable long term solution. The trick is, to avoid parking lot door ding heartbreak, you don’t build up the panel edge, you build up the solid part of the panel it meets. TC shows us the special easy to make tools, and his special tricks on the bonnet of a classic Jaguar E type, ending up with gaps more uniform than the handmade panels ever had when they left the factory in the 1960s.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Control Warpage on Sheet Metal on a Weld Joint with Gene Winfield

    There's a misconception among enthusiasts and even some professional body guys about welding sheet metal. The fact is that no matter how good or careful you are, metal WILL warp when you're welding on sheet metal.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Tech Tip- Making Dimple Holes without a Press

    Dimpled or flared holes in panels not only strengthens the panel, but also adds a "industrial" look to a panel that is really hot right now. This process dates back to the WWII era when panels for aircraft were done this way to add strength and save weight. That look trickled down to post-war race cars and eventually has become mainstream in styling into custom cars.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to apply body filler- Fix, Fill, and repair body damage Correctly.

    In this how-to session Kevin goes over the various Eastwood Contour polyester body fillers and surfacers, as well as other Eastwood products. He talks about which to use where, how much to use, how to apply it, how to shape and sand it, and how to get it ready for primer and paint.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to build a gas tank from scratch- Save Money and replace that Rusty Tank!

    Now that we're thawing out here in Eastwood country I've decided to get this old gal back on the road and I decided to tackle the mechanics. The problem with any "barn find" like this is that they normally have mechanically deteriorated just from sitting for so long. Normally people don't plan to park a vehicle for a long time, just until they get time to fix it up. This means all of the fluids are left in the vehicle and those fluids over time tend to break down and cause issues. The worst thing to do if you park a vehicle for a long period of time (more than 6-8 months in my opinion) is to leave fuel in the tank. Over time the fuel breaks down and turns back into it's original fossilized state. The temperature changes and the gas in the tank also promotes corrosion over time and the tank eventually rots out.  Click Here To Read Full Post...