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Eastwood Chatter

  • 5 Trail Items You Need on Your Truck

    When you're out on the trail your cell phone isn't going to save you. There's some key items you'll need to get your rig going when broken down or stuck on the trail. We decided to put together a short list of our favorite Eastwood products that are trail must-haves. These aren't the only items you need, but will definitely be key items for off-road vehicle survival!
  • How to fabricate and install Heavy Duty Threaded Inserts

    Recently when channeling my Ford Model A I wanted to use Grade 8 fasteners for all of the body mounts instead of just tapping threads into the frame or inserting rivnuts that could fail over time. First of all the 1/4" wall of the tubing wasn't really thick enough to give sufficient threads to hold the weight and twist of the body from normal driving. We came up with a slick solution and figured we'd share.

    I started by threading a batch of Grade 8 nuts onto a carriage bolt and locking them all together.

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    I then mounted the bolt into the lathe and cut off the hex portion of each nut leaving us with perfectly round grade 8 threaded inserts. The nuts were cut down just a hair bigger than 1/2" so they would be a press fit into a 1/2" drilled hole.

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    I then counter sunk each hole and threaded a bolt into each insert so I could adjust them so they were straight in the holes. I used the TIG 200 to carefully lay a weld puddle on the edge of the threaded insert melting it to the frame. You must take your time here and be very precise because a rogue dab of filler rod could go over the edge of the threaded insert and make your life hell when it comes time to thread a bolt back into the insert!

     

     

     

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    Hopefully you can use this method to put some clean, strong threaded inserts in your next project.

    -Matt/EW

  • Protect the Underside of your Off-Road Vehicle- The Coatings you need.

    Keeping the underside of your car protected is more important than you may think; even on your daily driver. Most "rotted out" vehicles you see started rusting in the underbelly of the car or truck. These are the areas that weren't protected properly from the factory or had a poor coating that broke down from year-round driving. On 4x4 and Off-Road vehicles the risk of road salt isn't as bad as the damage caused by driving over "stuff" (that's the fun of it right?). Your factory coatings aren't going to hold up to the rock chips, brush, etc dragging under your vehicle. The truth is, no coating can withstand some of the extreme conditions seen when rock crawling or off-roading. Think about it, if it damages the metal, NO coating is going to be able to withstand that sort of impact. But there are some coatings, or combinations of coatings that can hold up better than others. I put together a list of a few of my favorites below.
  • How Much Paint Do You Need to Paint a Car?

    There is no way to know exactly how much paint you need to paint every car, but there are basic guidelines. Of course the bigger the car, truck or van is the more paint you will need, and if you are spraying a basecoat/clearcoat you will need both components. One good way to make a more accurate estimate...
  • How to Make A Free Tuck Shrinking Fork

    You may not realize it, but many of our Eastwood tools are dreamt up and prototyped the same way you build things at home. We have a problem or see a need for a tool to help do a job right and we build something ourselves. I recently needed to shrink the edge of a panel that was on a vehicle and I couldn't get a shrinker stretcher on it to shrink. An alternative method is to "Tuck-Shrink" the area and use a hammer and dolly to shrink the metal into itself. I decided to make my own homemade tuck shrink tool from some old tools for free I had laying around and show you the process.

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