Tech Articles

Tech articles about anything related to Eastwood Tools, Paints, and Chemicals.

  • Project of the Week- Powder Coating a vintage Mini Bike

    Here at Eastwood we're always working on new products, but we always make sure we're testing products we've offered for quality. Recently JR decided to powder coat a vintage mini bike to show off some of our Hot Coat Powder and test the outcome of our metallic powders.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Powder Coating Aluminum and other Cast Parts

    Larger cast aluminum parts like transmission cases, cylinder heads, engine blocks, etc. can be difficult to get the current to pass through when powder coating a cold part and poor powder adhesion can be the result....  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Electroplating Safety

    When electroplating any piece of metal in your workspace, it is absolutely important that you exercise safety and take the proper precautions to avoid any kind of injury.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Custom Scratch Built Bed DIY for Project Pile House

    Project Pile House has been an ever-evolving project and like many projects, things start small and spiral out of control and next thing you know you're detailing the inside of your glove box hinges! Luckily I'm not quite that OCD about my vehicles (yet), but Pile House is now more than just a thrown-together junkyard parts runner like I originally planned. It's turned into a full blown custom and not much on the truck is original or untouched. After getting the cab, dash, hood, etc. all smoothed out and "roughed in", the original patched together bed and fenders was bothering the crap out of me every time I looked at it. The fenders looked like boat trailer fenders and were more roughed up than a boxer after a title fight, while the bed itself wasn't much better. I decided to start dreaming up a subtle custom bed.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How Do I Adjust the Flow Rate of Shielding Gas?

    Whenever you are using a welding machine, like a MIG welder or a TIG welder, it is crucial that you know how to adjust the flow rate of shielding gas. When assembling and setting up your welder, once you connect your shielding gas regulator, the gas flow rate must be adjusted in order to assure that the right amount of shielding gas is flowing over your weld. If too little gas is flowing from your welder, excessive spatter and contamination can occur. If too much gas is flowing, you will be wasting your gas, which can negatively affect the result of your weld. Typically, there are two gauges on the shielding gas regulator, one to mark the gas flow rate and one to mark the gas tank pressure.

    The first thing to do to adjust the flow rate of your shielding gas is open your shielding gas tank valve the whole way. Adjust the knob on the regulator so that it is marked at about 30 CFH. Now, turn on the welder and trigger the torch switch so that the gas will start to flow. When you trigger the torch switch, the gas flow should cause the needle on the gas flow gauge to descend to a steady and accurate reading. Next, the gas flow should be set to about 20 CFH when it is flowing, which is the most common flow rate used when welding. Sometimes this needs to be readjusted as a slight breeze could alter the flow and weaken the shielding gas consistency surrounding the weld. Once you have adjusted the flow rate, you are free to weld. Just remember to close the gas valve on the bottle when you are finished welding.

    To learn more about welding and for more automotive FAQs, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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