Tech Articles

Tech articles about anything related to Eastwood Tools, Paints, and Chemicals.

  • Removing Light Pitting and Scratches in Chrome with Household Items - Free and Easy Tip

    We all know that eventually your classic car's original chrome bumpers and trim will slowly become pitted.  For some buying new or re-chroming is not an option, but there is a free and easy tip to mute those light scratches and pitting so they are much less apparent.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Get Spraying with your New Paint Gun, Quick and Easy!

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    New Paint Gun? Not Sure What To Do Next?

    This Quick and Easy guide is all you will need to start painting your project in no time, you might be surprised just how easy it is.

    To start things off there are a few pieces of equipment you will need before you get to painting.  These items are required and you will not be able to continue without them.

    In addition to your new paint gun you'll need:

    1. Air Compressor (Preferably one that exceeds the minimum CFM of the paint gun)
    2. Air Filter, this can be a disposable or Wall Mounted Unit (This will make or break the overall outcome of the paint.  Even a little moisture or oil can ruin the paint)
    3. Gun Mounted Air regulator
    4. Lacquer Thinner (Used to clean the gun after Painting)

     

    Screen Shot 2015-08-26 at 4.35.58 PM

    Shown here in the picture above is the EW Concours Pro (left) and EW Concours Paint Gun (right).  These paint guns share the common controls found on almost all HVLP paint guns on the market,  from discount tool models to industry elite brands these tips are relatively universal.

    Air Fitting and Regulator

    Now you're Ready to set up the gun.  Depending on which paint gun you have, it may not have an air coupler attached to the bottom.  All you need is a little teflon tape (found at any hardware store) wrapped around the threads. First screw the regulator to the gun then screw on the air fitting to the regulator. Tighten using the supplied wrench which comes with most paint guns. This will ensure an airtight seal to the paint gun.

    !QUICK TIP! 

    !WHEN WRAPPING TAPE AROUND THREADS REMEMBER TO WRAP CLOCKWISE, THE SAME DIRECTION THE THREADS TIGHTEN.  IF REVERSED THE AIR COUPLER WILL UNWIND THE TAPE AS IT IS SCREWED ON!

     

    Setting Air Pressure

    Next you'll need to adjust the air flow to the gun.  This is where the gun-mounted regulator comes into play.  On the box or in the manual of your gun there will be a recommended pressure the gun operates most efficiently. (ex. 30 PSI)  Completely open the air flow adjustment on the gun and do not touch it, from now on the regulator will control the air flow through the gun. After your compressor is turned on and filled, connect the gun without the paint cup attached. Pull the trigger completely open while monitoring the reading on the regulator.  You will need to adjust the regulator to match the recommended pressure for your gun. (ex. so the regulator reads 30 PSI) Now that you have set the regulator unhook the gun.

     

    Fan Size and Fluid Adjustment

    This part can be tricky since the material you are spraying dictates the how big the fan size should be, how far away to hold the gun, and the correct overlap. Look to the packaging of the material you will be spraying to find the recommended values.  As a general tip, open the fluid adjustment all the way so the trigger can be fully engaged. If you are worrying about running the paint turn the fluid control in and slowly bring it back out as you get more comfortable spraying.

     

    Mixing Paint

    This also depended on the material being sprayed but generally the mix ratios are printed on the container or packaging of the material you will be using. Attach the paint cup, pour in the paint, and seal off the cup. You're almost ready to paint!

    Remember to attach the paint cup and pour the paint into gun without the air line attached.  It is easy to bump the trigger and accidentally spray paint where you don't want it.

     

    Attaching the Air Line

    After the paint is in the gun and the lid is on tight you are ready to attach the airline and get to painting.  Make sure you have a panel or piece of cardboard to use to test the spray pattern.  This is when you will use the fluid control and the fan adjustment to get the desired pattern for the material.

    Get to Painting!

    There you go now you can start painting all of your projects with you own paint gun.  At first it can be difficult to remember to do all of the steps in order but it wont take long to become second nature.

    DONT FORGET!

    Cleaning you gun is just as important as setting up to paint!  All you need is an empty metal paint can and Aerosol Injected Cleaner or lacquer thinner and its that easy.

    After you are done painting detach the gun from the air line.  Then empty the paint cup into the paint can. Now using Aerosol Injected Cleaner, a Solution Bottle filled with thinner or (I'VE FOUND THAT A CONTACTS SOLUTION BOTTLE WORKS), hold the paint gun over the paint can with the trigger pulled and pour the thinner into the gun where the paint gun attaches.  The thinner will run through the gun and out the nozzle.  Continue to pour thinner until it comes out of the gun clear.  Make sure you clean the gun immediately after painting so the paint does not dry in the gun.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future article or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

     

    - James R. / EW

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  • Step up your Hammer Game! Using Intermediate Body hammers and Dollies

    Back when cars were made of heavy metal and had lots of beautiful curves guys took the time to repair a fender rather than just replace it. Any good metal worker will tell you that you need to match the hammer and dolly as close as possible with the shape of your panel you're working on. When you're working on a curvy car like something from the late 1930's through the 1950's you will be hard pressed to find a flat panel on the vehicle. This means that you will need to use tools to match. Back in those days the selection of specialty hammers were vast, some being specifically used for one type of car or type of repair!  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Project Pile House- Shaving the Door handles

    Since guys have been customizing cars, shaving the door handles has been one of the most common modifications to make the car look as smooth as possible. This process can be a pretty simple process, but there are a few things that can make it go smoothly. I decided to show the process on Project Pile House.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Metal Buffing Tips and Tricks

    Buffing is just the process of smoothing the minor high and low spots on a surface until it is perfectly smooth. Typically it is done with fabric wheels and abrasive compounds of various types. You progressively move from a very aggressive, to a less aggressive compound, and matching wheel, until you polish your piece to a near mirror finish.  Click Here To Read Full Post...