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Tech Articles

Tech articles about anything related to Eastwood Tools, Paints, and Chemicals.

  • How to Keep Metal from Warping While Bead Rolling

    If you have a bead roller, and you try to add a wide or deep bead to a thin piece of metal; or multiple beads to the same piece, you will find the metal starts to deform. You may get perfect beads in the piece you are working on, but it suddenly looks like a metal potato chip. That is because the bead roller does not necessarily stretch the metal as it presses beads into it. If you have an English wheel you can fix this problem before you begin. This problem is especially bad when rolling beads that don’t go all the way to the edge, or rolling different length beads in the same panel. Follow along as we show you a simple way to keep your panel straight when bead rolling.
  • How to Build Simple Engine Mounts for a Hot Rod

    To me building a hot rod or custom car is all about building with what you've got, using some ingenuity, and making things from scratch. Sure you can point and click with your mouse and buy a "hot rod in a box" from online vendors, but I think that those cars lose the soul that makes a hot rod so dang cool. Recently I built a chassis for a 1930 Ford Model A coupe I'm putting together and I needed to make some simple motor mounts to attach the Flathead to the chassis. I know you can buy some, but where's the fun in that?! I decided to show a simple way to make some mounts from scratch.
  • Taking Pictures During Disassembly To Save Time Later

    We've all been there, you're getting ready to put your project back together but you have no idea what goes where.  Running into a problem like this can set your project back and even sometimes cause a loss of motivation.

    Today almost everyone has a smartphone or cell phone with a camera, the easiest way to remember exactly where everything goes is to snap a few photos before, during and after disassembly.  Now you know exactly where everything goes and wont have to browse the internet to find a car similar to yours.  The key is to take pictures at different points during the process.  Sometimes I'll even print the pictures out and write some notes down on parts I know I'll forget.

    Here is an example of pictures I took while disassembling my car before painting it.

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    The first picture Is of the door panel with only the trim off.  I will use this in the end a reference to how the inside of the door should look when it is completely done.

     

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    The next picture is with the door panel removed. As you can see there are many electrical connections all with similar plugs all going different directions.  Now I will not have to worry about which wire goes to each connection, all I have to do is reference these pictures and I'm good to go.

     

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    Last I took a picture after the inner door was removed.  I may not end up needing it but it doesn't hurt having it around to reference in case a part goes missing or something gets broken.

    Taking pictures also helps if your project spans a long period of time.  You may think you'll remember where everything goes but its worth the extra time to take a few pictures because you never know what may happen.

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

  • Properly Store Your Air Hoses So They Don't Kink - Quick Tip

    Air hoses can be a pain especially if you don't have a retractable hose reel, but its important to take care of them if you want them to last.

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    If you're not ready to invest in a Retractable Air Hose, here is a quick tip to increase the longevity of your hose so it wont kink or crack.

     

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    The key to storing air hoses is twisting the hose and allow it to wrap itself.  This will create a coiling effect that won't put any extra strain on the hose.  When you forcefully wrap an air hose it stretches the rubber and can create cracks over time.

     

    Once its all coiled up you cant just leave it on the floor you need a way to mount it.

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    A bicycle wall hook like this works great to hang the hose, because there is more than one point of contact on the hose which allows it to keep an evenly coiled shape.  You can find these very cheap at your local home or hardware store.

     

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    If you want a unique look, mount an old car rim to the wall.  Its a creative way to give your garage some character while keeping your air hose protected and off the floor.

     

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    While these are all great ways of keeping your air hose safe, the best way to keep your air hose safe is with an Eastwood Retractable Air Hose.  After you are done with the hose, give it a slight pull and it will retract back onto the reel.  If you are ready to make the investment for a Retractable Air Hose, don't hesitate, you will never have to worry about  your air hose again.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

  • How to Prep Metal For Welding - Quick Tip

    DIRTY WELDS ARE NEVER STRONG, CLEAN YOUR METAL BEFORE WELDING

    The key to any good weld is clean metal, but what is the best way to clean metal before you start welding? Depending on the tools you have and the overall goal of the project there are a few ways to prep your metal to get a nice clean weld every time.

    The best welds come from pure clean metal to metal contact,  any foreign materials in the welding area can cause welding imperfections.  Even brand new metal must be prepped before it can be welded because there is usually a coating put on new metal so it does not rust or oxidize during the shipping process.  This is a factor that is often overlooked and will always result in a weak and ugly weld.  Be mindful, once you remove this coating the metal is exposed to the elements,  if left out unprotected steel will begin to rust, even indoors.

    To start, the type of welding you are doing will determine how you prep the metal. Inherently MIG welding steel does not need the metal to be perfectly clean. On the other extreme, TIG welding aluminum requires contaminant free metal to create a strong clean weld.  In all of the examples below you can see the difference the dull color of the "new metal" (left) compared to how it looks after it is properly prepped (right).

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    Angle Grinder with Flap Disc

    Using an angle grinder with a flap disc works great to prep steel for MIG or TIG welding.  Mild steel does not require the surface to be super clean to get a good weld.  In the picture above you can see the left side is brand new untouched steel, it may look clean but it has a thin coating like stated earlier.  Once you remove the coating with the flap disc, all it takes is a quick wipe down with Low VOC PRE or Acetone and you will be able to make clean and effective welds. This method works great for heavy welding on chassis parts, this area is always exposed to the elements which will build up contamination over time.  Take the time and clean the metal, you'll thank yourself later.

    Be careful a flap disc will remove a lot of material so don't use this on thin sheet metal, it may compromise the metals strength.

     

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    Sand Paper

    Similar to using a grinder this method will work great for MIG and TIG welding steel or stainless, but it can be time consuming and does not always remove all of the coatings. Like using a grinder, you must wipe the metal down with Low VOC PRE or Acetone before welding.  In the picture above I used 80 Grit sandpaper,  it worked well by removing the coating but also left deep scratches that may not look good.

     

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    Abrasive blasting

    If the metal you will be welding is very rusty and is not suitable to be sanded or removed with a grinder another option to prep the metal is to blast it.  After blasting the metal may look clean but it will still need to be wiped down with Low VOC PRE or acetone to remove and chemical contaminants.  The abrasive material can sometimes trap pieces of other metals that can cause the metal you are welding to rust or corrode.  Never rely on a blaster to prep aluminum for welding, it is very sensitive to contaminants that can get trapped even after wiping it down.

     

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    Cleaning for aluminum TIG Welding

    When prepping aluminum there is a slightly different process that you will need to be mindful of.  Aluminum is very susceptible to contaminants therefore the cleaning process must be done in reverse to produce clean welds.

    First you must wipe down the metal with Low VOC PRE or acetone, this will remove any oils or grease on the surface.  The next step is to remove any oxides on the surface of the metal.  To do this use stainless steel wool or a stainless wire brush on the area to be welded.  Make sure that the Steel wool or wire brush is used exclusively for aluminum to avoid contaminants from other metals.  Once these tools come in contact with mild steel they can transfer steel bits into the aluminum which will eventually create rust.  Finally wipe down the metal with Low VOC PRE or acetone with a clean cloth or rag, from here you are ready to weld.

     

    It doesn't matter what kind of welding you are doing its always important to take the time to clean your metal before welding.  Not only will your welds look amazing they will be a lot stronger which is always an added bonus.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

     

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