ESI processing not enabled ESI processing not enabled
ESI processing not enabled

What is an English Wheel? By: Nick Capinski

What is an English Wheel?

An English Wheel, also known as a Wheeling Machine, is a metalworking tool that enables the user to form compound curves in sheets of metal.  The wheeling process stretches the metal between a top rolling wheel and the bottom anvil wheel.  With different anvils, varying curvature can be added to the metal.  English Wheels are commonly used to fabricate coach-built automotive panels, aircraft skins, and more.

Eastwood Benchtop English Wheel

Commonly out of reach for most hobbyists due to costs and size restraints, many hobbyists have had to resort to poor stamped replacement panels or trying to fabricate a panel without the proper tools.  For the DIY home hobbyist, an English Wheel opens up opportunities to fabricate custom panels, and recreate hard to find panels.

What Makes Eastwood’s English Wheel Different?

Eastwood is proud to offer this knockdown, Bench Top English Wheel, priced for the home hobbyist, that offers features not found on large, industrial units.  This kit allows the DIY-hobbyist and seasoned metal fabricator to recreate panels that they have been unable to in the past.

Eastwood’s English Wheel offers 20" throat and 18" internal height making this unit one of the largest bench-top English Wheels on the market. Large 8" wheel and 5" radius anvil wheel offer unsurpassed forming ability. Rigid frame is fabricated like large bridge spans, with doubler plates and structural hardware, offering the most rigid frame in its class. Micro-adjustable anvil adjustment wheel. X and Y axis adjustment on the large forming wheel allows even the most experienced fabricator the adjustability to set up the wheel to personal preference. Structural frame is fabricated from 2"x3"x0.187"-wall cold-rolled steel and high-tensile-strength hardware.  With the knockdown feature, this unit can be shipped via FedEx (saving you in truck shipment costs) and it mounts easily to your workbench or in a vise – stow away when not in use.

Click Here To See How To Make A Fender Flare Using The Eastwood Engish Wheel

Leave a Reply
ESI processing not enabled