• Cutting out the fat.

      This past weekend I got some more work done on the donor chassis-vehicle. I started by getting the rest of the front end removed, then we unbolted the bed from the chassis to gain access to where we needed to cut. Next we moved to the moment my inner child had been waiting for, cutting the cab apart! I opted to use the Versa Cut Plasma Cutter on 220V to blast through the cowl above the firewall and the A-pillars. I also decided to zip through the door hinge brackets since I will be using all of this from the Dodge Body.

      After i got the main section of the roof cut off with the windshield and all, I cut the back of the cab off to get it in the basic configuration I will need for grafting the Dodge body into it. Next we test fit panels and begin a game plan on the best way to fit it all together.

      After a quick test fit of the front end, I could quickly see that the Dodge inner fenders had to be cut out quite a bit to fit over the chassis. I should have done this from the beginning really, as I plan to run some oversized wheels and install airbags.. so it surely would need the space to tuck the wheels anyways! Here are some before and afters of the room I freed up by removing the inner fenders on the front end.

      This week I am hoping to roughly cut-out the floor of the Dodge cab, and then lift it over the floor/firewall on the chassis and see what needs to be done to mate the 2 pieces. I am pretty excited to get it looking "Old" quite soon! Watch this space, the sparks have just begun to fly!

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    • Eastwood Daily News

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    • Eastwood Daily News

      • The guys over at Popular Hot Rodding posted another small update on their '68 Nova project where they used one of... http://fb.me/tHIF14ts #
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    • How to spot a bad TIG Tungsten Tip

      I am a wiz when it comes to MIG welding after many years of practice, and I usually can spot the cause of a poor weld, or why a machine isn't welding correctly pretty easily. But with TIG welding, I am pretty much a total beginner in the grand scheme of things. I've been taking tips from the more experienced guys here and even a few local pros.The big thing I've recently been trying to focus on is making sure my tungsten tip is ground correctly; and while I'm welding that it is kept in the correct shape. After some practice yesterday, I took 2 shots of tungsten tips that were incorrect, and I had to regrind. I figured I'd share so that it helps other beginners learn from my mistakes and makes their learning experience that much better.

      The first here is a green tungsten in which I had the TIG 200 set to put too much heat to the torch. It was making the ball far too large and hard to center when setting up a freshly ground tip. I cranked the clearance effect down from -1 to -3.5 and I was able to make a smaller ball much easier. Lesson learned there!

      The second picture below is of a red tungsten I had been using. I found that my arc was wandering quite badly. It was making it very hard to focus the puddle, and then it hit me, I had every-so-briefly touched the tungsten to the work surface when I first started welding and it deformed the tip. I've been told time and time again, you must stop and regrind your tungsten if you touch it to the work surface while welding. It doesn't matter even if it is for a split second, it will still deform the tungsten and cause an inconsistant arc.

      I'll add more of these tips and hints as I make mistakes and (hopefully!) get better. I hope it can give anyone that is a beginner some insight on what to look for when first starting out!

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