• Plasti Dip FAQ's - Frequently Asked Questions About Dipping Cars

    Plasti Dip is a flexible, rubber coating that was originally used for dipping tool handles.  Recently, it has been found to be an easy alternative to painting vehicles. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about Plasti Dip:

    How long does Plasti Dip® last?
    How well will Plasti Dip® hold up to the elements (sun, rain, snow, salt)?
    Will Plasti Dip® hold up to heat and racing?
    How does Plasti Dip® hold up to gasoline?
    Does Plasti Dip® peel off?
    How many coats of Plasti Dip® should I apply?
    How should I prep my wheels or car before dipping or brushing-on?
    Can I expect Plasti Dip® to work exactly the same on every surface?
    Could Plasti Dip® damage the clear coat already on the surface?
    How do I clean the Plasti-Dipped areas of my car?
    Can I use Plasti Dip® as a clear protective bra for the front of my car?
    Can I use Plasti Dip® over headlights and taillights?
    Can I apply Plasti Dip® Glossifier over non-dipped areas?
    How far from the surface should I hold the can as I spray Plasti Dip®?
    Can Plasti Dip® protect my wheels from winter salt and snow?
    Does Eastwood sell gallon sizes of Plasti Dip®?
    Can Plasti Dip® be sprayed with a spray gun?
    Can I even cover a black car in white Plasti Dip®?
    How many gallons of Plasti Dip® is necessary to dip a car?

    How long does Plasti Dip® last?
    The key to making Plasti Dip® last for at least 3 years—without the need for retouching—is to make sure it's applied properly in the first place. Plasti Dip® is very durable and won't lose its bond, but two things will help determine how long it, in fact, can last. The first is the distance you hold the can from the surface as you spray. The second is the number of coats you spray on the surface. So please follow directions closely. Feel free to spray-on a refresher coat of Plasti Dip® at any time.
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    How well will Plasti Dip® hold up to the elements (sun, rain, snow, salt)?
    Whether it's the hot sun beating down its UV rays on your Plasti Dipped surface, or the constant battering by ice, rain or abrasive road salt, Plasti Dip® resists them all. That would explain why many users dip their car wheels into Plasti Dip® (or brush it on) before winter's worst has a chance to eat away at the metal.
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    Will Plasti Dip® hold up to heat and racing?
    Plasti Dip® can resist up to 200°F, and has been known to handle the heat and abuse produced at racing or rally car events. However, heat resistance really depends on how long Plasti Dip is exposed to that heat, and how you expect the coating to perform in that heat. In general, if the coating will not be subject to impacts, nor is it expected to resist abrasion or chemicals, and if it's just for a short amount of time, most Plasti Dip surfaces would be able to handle temperatures outside the listed range. Always test first.
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    How does Plasti Dip® hold up to gasoline?
    Since Plasti Dip® is a solvent-based coating, it does not hold up well to gasoline. Therefore, you must be careful when filling your gas tank or working with gasoline around a Plasti Dip® surface. Thinners and other solvents will also damage Plasti Dip®.
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    Does Plasti Dip® peel off?
    When you want it to, Plasti Dip® actually does peel off. But one reason Plasti Dip® might be hard to remove is if it was applied in too thin a coat. If the layer of Plasti Dip is too thin, it will tear into several pieces as you try to peel it off, making removal a real headache. To make removing Plasti Dip easier, add another coat (4 to 5 coats in total would be very helpful), because Plasti Dip adheres best to itself! That added strength of an additional layer lets you peel it all off in one piece. Those added layers also add durability while it's still in place.
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    How many coats of Plasti Dip® should I apply?
    The more, the better, both for increased durability and easier peel-off when you're ready for that. Surfaces that will be exposed to harsher conditions (like wheels and other car surfaces in snow and ice, under the harsh sun, or driving over gravel) stand to benefit from additional coats of Plasti Dip®. In any case, the suggested minimum is 4-5 coats.
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    How should I prep my wheels or car before dipping or brushing-on?
    You want to make sure the surface is as clean and free of grease, oil, dirt, debris or wax as possible, so we'd suggest using Eastwood PRE Paint Prep. Most items you plan on coating don't require priming because the Plasti Dip® shrinks around the item as it dries. But in extreme conditions, or when applying Plasti Dip® on a large metal surface, we recommend primer. Use Plasti Dip® Primer or a high-quality acrylic automotive-type primer. Rust-Oleum® primer is not recommended.
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    Can I expect Plasti Dip® to work exactly the same on every surface?
    Short answer: maybe. For most surfaces, Plasti Dip® works just as you'd expect, but there are situations where Plasti Dip might not do that. Those situations might depend on how old the car is, the condition of the clear coat used, whether the surface already has a DIY paint job. These and other factors could effect the way the Plasti Dip® bonds, peels or covers. Most of you can expect a predictable and hassle-free experience using Plasti Dip®, but you still might want to do a small test spot on the surfaces before you begin.
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    Could Plasti Dip® damage the clear coat already on the surface?
    For several years people have used Plasti Dip® without problems on car surfaces that have been dipped, peeled and re-dipped. But even with Plasti Dip's record of success, you should still dip a small test spot on your car first. If your car has ever been repainted, consider longer dip test periods, just to be sure. Because every paint shop uses different types and amounts of clearcoat, Plasti Dip cannot assure the exact same result on every unique paint job.
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    How do I clean the Plasti-Dipped areas of my car?
    All you've got to do is use some soapy water in a bucket, and a rag. Or you can use a window cleaner. Whatever you usually use to wash similar materials should work well. But when cleaning your Plasti Dip surface, stay away from thinners and solvents that can damage Plasti Dip, and certainly don't use gasoline as a cleaner on dried Plasti Dip.
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    Can I use Plasti Dip® as a clear protective bra for the front of my car?
    Hundreds of Plasti Dip® customers have had the smart idea of using the Original Clear Plasti Dip® as a protective bra on their vehicle. After all, no aftermarket car bra can fit as tightly as a dipped car bra! It provides the ultimate front-end protection, "matches" the vehicle color, and fits even better than a glove.
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    Can I use Plasti Dip® over headlights and taillights?
    In most cases, Plasti Dip peels easily off most lights. However, there seem to be a few types of headlights and taillights that don't work well with Plasti Dip. To be safe, always mask off headlights and taillights to avoid getting Plasti Dip on them.
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    Can I apply Plasti Dip® Glossifier over non-dipped areas?
    Glossifier can be sprayed over non-coated areas to add a glossy finish. And it also will peel off afterwards, just like regular Plasti Dip®. However, because Plasti Dip Glossifier is specially formulated to bond with the unique chemical structure of Plasti Dip coatings, it's not generally recommended for other surfaces.
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    How far from the surface should I hold the can as I spray Plasti Dip®?
    The recommended spray distance is 4" to 5" away from the surface...and the key is to keep the can moving!
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    Can Plasti Dip® protect my wheels from winter salt and snow?
    Since Plasti Dip is extremely resistant to the worst that winter can throw at it, many people actually dip their vehicle's wheels and cars specifically to help protect the original surfaces from winter snow, ice and road salt.
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    Does Eastwood sell gallon sizes of Plasti Dip®?
    Eastwood sells Plasti Dip® in gallons in a few colors. (We even sell a 5-gallon can of black Plasti Dip®, in case you're starting your own dipping business!) Each gallon of Plasti Dip will cover approximately 30 square feet at a 15-mil. thickness.
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    Can Plasti Dip® be sprayed with a spray gun?
    Yes, you can spray Plasti Dip using a variety of sprayers and spray guns, but it needs to be thinned first. We suggest using xylene, toluene or naphtha, and mix in a 1:1 ratio. See our Earlex Spray Station HV3500, the multi-purpose, turbine HVLP spray gun system designed for do-it-yourselfers.
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    Can I even cover a black car in white Plasti Dip®?
    Yes, but it'll take more than the usual amount of Plasti Dip® to do it. To turn your black car white, expect to go through more than three gallons of Plasti Dip. Maybe get four or five gallons, just to be sure you have enough! (You can always return a never-opened gallon.)

    Here's a "tech tip": Use a "mid coat" to help with coverage when making a drastic color change (black to white, etc.). Our customers have found that using gray as that "mid coat" seems to help with the color transition, requiring fewer coats to fully hide the original color.
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    How many gallons of Plasti Dip® is necessary to dip a car?
    How much Plasti Dip you need depends on the project's surface area, and what you're dipping. If you're "dipping" an entire car, here are some general requirements:

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    If this is the first time you're dipping a whole car, or if you're using one of the lighter colors (white, orange, yellow and so forth), get yourself an extra gallon or two. (You don't want to run out of Plasti Dip in middle of your projects, and you can always return a never-opened gallon.)

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