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Tag Archives: automobile

  • Repair Manuals Will Save Your Project

    If you plan on doing any type of serious work on your car or even just basic maintenance its a good idea to to buy a vehicle specific repair manual.  Depending on the car you drive it may be harder to find the exact manual, but for the most part a simple internet search will help you find the correct one for your car.  If you think buying one of these is not necessary you should probably reconsider.  The companies that produce these manuals have already done all the hard work for you.  These manuals usually have step by step instructions on how to take apart and reassemble every part of your vehicle, some even will show a full engine break down.

    Nova Manual

    Going in to a project blind can be fun because we all want to figure everything out for ourselves and not have any help along the way.  What happens if you hit a wall in the middle or forget how something goes back together? In this situation you only have a few options, even searching the internet may not help because you may already be over your head.

    engine

    Having a repair manual will allow you to go into a project without any unknowns, some will even give tips on the exact way to remove the part so you don't break it.  I know first hand that my car would not be running today without the help of a repair manual.  If your vehicle requires special tools, a manual will not only tell you what tool you will need, but also give a part number which will make locating one easier.

    suspension

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

  • How Air Compressors Work

    The concept behind the air compressor is a simple one and easily understandable to anyone who is into old cars and such. The reason the pump on the top of your compressor looks like a simplified motorcycle engine is because it basically is. The vast majority of compressors, from the tiny 12v tire inflator you stash in your trunk to the big 80 gallon shop unit, basically compress air with an air cooled piston engine. In fact, there are kits to turn air cooled VW bug motors into gas powered air compressors that could be mounted in the bed of a truck; two cylinders power it and two compress the air.

    img-y

    When the electric motor kicks in, the piston is drawn down the stroke of the cylinder. A simple spring-loaded one way valve opens allowing clean atmospheric air in, usually sucking thru some kind of air filter to keep out dirt and dust just like your car. The piston then moves up, compressing the air, and a 2nd valve opens to let the now pressurize air into the tank, or out into your tire in the case of a tire inflator or the one outside at the gas station. When a gauge signals that the tank has the correct pressure, the motor stops.

    Because air tools, spray guns and the like only allow the air out thru a restriction, the tank stays pressurized for a while. If an air hose were to break, the air would all come out pretty quick and return to atmospheric pressure in seconds. The CFM rating on a compressor indicates how many cubic feet of air per minute can leak out via the tool you are using before the pump would be unable to keep up with the demand at a given pressure.

    Multi-Stage and Screw Compressors

    There are variations on how air compressors work. There are multi stage reciprocating compressors, and nearly silent rotary screw compressors.

    Pistoncompressors-2

    Two stage compressors typically have a v-twin looking head on top of the tank. The first cylinder works just like a single stage, but instead of feeding the tank, it feeds the intake on a second smaller cylinder, the second cylinder, then compresses it even more. There are also three piston versions that work the same way, as well as single stage multi-cylinder units for more air flow at lower pressures.

    oilfree rotary screw casing_tcm1340-3536433

    Rotary screw compressors work more like a Roots-type supercharger. Two rotors intermesh, forcing air into a smaller space along the length of the rotors, and finally out into the tank. Because of how they work, they produce more of a constant “whir” then the “chuga-chuga” of a reciprocating pump. This makes them popular for applications where noise is an issue. This type of compressor is also generally used in larger industrial application because of its increased efficiency and ability to deliver larger volumes of air at high pressure.

    Care and Maintenance

    wscdr02a

    No matter how you compress the air, you have to deal with the physics of thermal dynamics and moisture. Squishing the air makes it hot, it’s an unavoidable by-product of compression, which is why some units have cooling fins on the supply line to the tank, or even a separate intercooler. All air has moisture in it too and compressing it results in condensation, which is why you need to drain the tank occasionally, and use an air dryer in applications like spraying paint. Just like an engine, compressors need to be lubricated, and if you are spraying paint, you need to strip the oil out of the airstream as well as the water. Luckily, most air dryers function this way already.

  • How to Select a MIG Welder

    So you are ready to get serious about your metal work, and you want to add a wire feed welder to your shop’s arsenal. Good for you, a welder is one of the most useful pieces of shop equipment. Below, we take a look at the features and specifications you need to think about before deciding which one is right for you.

    Flux Core VS MIG

    Wire feed welders actually consist of 2 different welding types: Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Flux Core. Flux core uses wire with a hollow core that releases a shielding gas as it melts. MIG uses a solid core wire and a tank of inert gas which shields the weld from contamination. Nearly every MIG machine can do flux core welding, but not every wire feed welder set up for flux core can be converted.

    Flux 90

     

    Eastwood Flux Core 90

    Besides the lower cost, flux core welding does have other advantages. The flux does a better job of shielding in windy or dirty environments, so it’s great for field work. No gas and no tank – That means one less consumable to buy, and a smaller lighter unit to carry around if you take it to the job site or race track. Plus, flux core actually burns hotter, so it is actually better for welding thicker material.

    There are several disadvantages of getting the lower cost, flux core only machine. First, flux core produces sloppy looking welds with lots of splatter, even in the hands of a pro. Second, because it burns hotter it is hard to weld thinner sheet metal without a lot of burn through.

    Wire feed chart

    So there's lots you can accomplish with just flux core wire, but, except for the lower initial purchase price, there is no reason to get just a flux core wire feed welder, when every MIG machine can do both. above you will see the suggested settings for the Eastwood MIG 135.  The bottom two lines of the top chart show the suggested settings if using Flux core wire.

    Choosing a MIG Welder

    MIG 175

    MIG welding (Metal Inert Gas) takes the basic method of wire fed flux core welding, and uses a solid wire instead, plus a tank of gas which provides the shielding. Many basic flux core welding set ups can be converted to do MIG welding with just a few parts. Typically, you need to add a gas solenoid, a regulator, and a tank of shielding gas, though some already come equipped with the solenoid.

    MIG works just like flux core: you pull the trigger, wire is fed, and gas comes out the tip to shield the weld. MIG welding produces cleaner, neater, more consistent welds, especially at lower heats on thinner metal. MIG is also the preferred way to weld aluminum, though you will need a special aluminum spool gun, and a tank of argon.

    110v VS 220v

    This choice may be dictated strictly by where you are planning on using it; if your shop isn’t wired for 220v, or you plan on using it on the go, 110v is the choice for you. But there are some welding units out there that run on either voltage, with just an adapter plug. This is a great compromise if you are planning on rewiring your shop in the future, or already have 220v in the shop, but want to be able to weld anywhere and everywhere.

    The Eastwood MIG 135 is our entry level MIG welder.  It is perfect for the home user that wants a shielded welder but only has 110V power source.  This welder is rated to 3/16" which is perfect for auto body and basic structural repair.

    Moving on to the next level is the Eastwood MIG 175.  This is a 220V only unit which means it will be able to weld thicker metal up to 5/16" steel.  You may think that there is not much difference between the two but the big difference is the duty cycle.  With the MIG 175 you will be able to weld on a higher setting for longer periods of time.

    Lastly we offer the Eastwood MIG 250, this is a dual voltage unit and is internally controlled.  This means that you don't need to change any settings when going from 110V to 220V, just simply plug it into the desired power source and the welder will adjust accordingly.  On 220V this welder is rated to 1/2" steel, making it great for heavy structural welding.

    But what are the advantages of the higher voltage? Obviously a higher voltage unit is more powerful than a lower voltage one; they typically can put out more heat and weld thicker materials. This is also important for welding aluminum, which requires more amperage compared to welding steel of the same thickness. If working with a lower amperage within the range of most 110v units, like 90 amps for instance, a 220v unit is going to have a much higher duty cycle. So, you’ll be able to get more done faster, with less down time.

    Duty Cycle

    Screenshot 2015-11-11 16.17.57

    The duty cycle for a welder is usually expressed as a percentage at a given amperage, 20% at 90 amps for instance. That is a typical rating for a home use 110v MIG welder, it means with the power set to 90 amps, you should only be welding continuously for 2 out of every 10 minutes to avoid overloading the welder. You could see how that would be an issue if you were building a bridge, or a tube famed chassis. A 220v machine is often rated at 30% at 135 amps, and something like 60% at a lower 90 amp setting. That means you can weld much longer without overheating the machine and having to take a rest.

    Transformer VS Inverter

    Years ago all MIG welders were transformer welders. They all used windings of wire to transform the 60hz AC voltage coming out of the wall into much higher voltage at the end of the welding torch, but still at 60hz. In the 21st century, there are now welders that use solid state inverters to step up the wave frequency of the electricity to much more than 60 cycles per second. Because of this, they can produce higher voltages with much smaller transformers. Since transformers are just windings of copper wire, the smaller they can be, the more portable the welding unit can be. The inverter technology also allows machines like the Eastwood 200 Amp MIG/Stick to exist because they can switch internally to the different electrical requirements of flux core, MIG welding and stick welding, and produce different shaped waves if need be.

    Inverter based units also need much less energy to run. If you are planning on running your welder off of a generator the inverter is the way to go. Transformer-based units require a much larger generator in order to work. The extra money you spend to move up to the inverter unit is money you will save by buying a smaller generator. The lower current draw of an inverter unit typically means you can run it on an extension cord for easier use around the shop. Your electric bill will be lower too.

    Adjustability

    Photo Nov 11, 4 28 28 PM

    Some machines these days can practically set themselves up, while on the low end some just have “high” or “low” heat settings. Like all things, if you can’t adjust it to suit you, you are going to have to adjust to suit it. MIG machines usually have 2 important settings: wire feed speed and power. Most times the more power you use the faster you want the wire to be fed, but not always. The more basic machines usually have fewer settings, and typically are “stepped” or “notched” meaning you can’t choose a setting between 1 and 2. The better machines are infinitely adjustable; you can choose any setting between anywhere on the dial, not just the numbers 1-10. If you can’t find a setting that works with the speed you want to weld on the material you are working with, then you have the change your speed to suit the output you can get. This is where the fine adjustments can come in handy.

    Parts and Serviceability

    A welder ought to be a lasting investment, but buy a unit from a low cost generic brand that hasn’t been around for long, and you may find parts and consumables impossible to find in a few years. At Eastwood we have been here since the late 1970s and we plan on being here a long time, standing behind our products. Not only do we have quality welding units at an attractive price, but we also carry all the parts and supplies you will ever need for them, except for the gas, but if it was possible we would sell that as well. We sell replacement tips, wire, torches and more for our MIG welders. We also have technical support for you by phone and email.

    We are committed to providing professional quality welding machines at a price the home hobbyist can enjoy. You can buy more powerful welders from other brands, and you can buy less expensive welders, but we don’t think you will find a better welder for less.

  • Eastwood’s ‘Shop Talk’, Episode 36: TC Penick & The Crew of Bay One Customs

    Sit tight & listen to Kevin, joined by TC Penick and the boys from Bay One Customs, taking the time away from saving Kevin’s butt yet again for this week’s episode of Shop Talk.
  • Eastwood’s ‘Shop Talk’, Episode 35.5: TC Penick - Custom Builder & Owner of Bay One Customs

    On this upcoming episode, we’ll speak with TC Penick of Bay One Customs out of Springfield, Tennessee. TC turned heads at SEMA 2013 with his 1958 Chevy Cameo Concept Truck.

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