Tag Archives: build

  • Second Time is a Charm- Painting a 1971 Chevy Camaro

    Just about everyone at Eastwood is a car guy or gal in some shape or form, so we all love conversing with our customers about what projects they're working on. Every now and then we get a really cool story about a project one of you are working on and we want to share it with everyone. This story is from Jeremy B. that recently shared a picture of his first paint project, a 1971 Chevy Camaro. Read along as Jeremy tells us how he got a second chance to build the car he wanted to build as a kid!  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Bay One Customs Builds a 1958 Chevrolet Cameo Concept Truck for SEMA 2013

    58 Chevy Cameo Concept Rendering

    TC Penick and Bay One Customs are names you may start hearing more of very soon. We first introduced you to TC during our Interview and Feature of Kevin Tetz and his "Jaded" Mustang . TC and Bay One were the driving forces behind helping Kevin finish the car for SEMA 2012. Quietly TC had been planning to build a one-off creation of a 1958 Chevy Cameo Concept Truck. This truck was one of the many concepts that were designed for Chevy but never made it into production. TC has been doing his homework on what the proportions, shapes, and overall look of the truck should be. He's been working steadily to make this truck an homage to "what could've been". This hard work hasn't gone unnoticed and the Cameo Concept truck has been invited to the 2013 SEMA Show. We're honored to say that TC and the Bay One crew have been using Eastwood products from bare metal on up to build this truck and detail the build along the way. Follow the build on the Bay One Customs Blog for the most recent updates. for now we'll leave you with some of these teasers they've supplied us with so far!

    -Matt/EW

    58 Chevy Cameo Concept Truck

    58 Chevy Cameo Concept Truck

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  • Forming The Firewall and Gathering Steering and Braking Parts

    After getting the old swiss cheese firewall removed from the truck I started making the new firewall for Project Pile House. I started by having one of our tech advisors Sean help me make a cardboard pattern. Once the pattern was made we scribed out the shape onto our metal using a pick from the Eastwood 4 Piece Puller/Scraper/Pick Set. I decided I wanted a smooth firewall for a "cleaned" look. Because of that I won't be running beads in the firewall so I opted for 16 gauge sheet metal.

    I wanted to make clean cuts in the metal so I decided to put our Electric Metal Shears to the test and make the majority of the cuts with them. I know we only rate them to 18 gauge, but I had heard rumors that these were actually tested up to 16 gauge with no issues. I was pleasantly surprised that the shears (with well-used blades even!) cut right through the 16 gauge with no issues. I can't say how pleased I was to make those long cuts quickly with the shears. I then fired up the Versa Cut 40 Plasma Cutter to make the cuts for the radii on the tunnel notch and top outer corners. I made the cuts in a single pass with the machine on 110V at around 18 Amps and 60 PSI.

    Now that I had the basic shape of the firewall cut out I did some minor trimming to make space around the headers and the valve covers for engine movement. I next made some "witness" marks in the firewall and the truck to have a quick way to match up the firewall each time I fit it. I want to make the transition into the firewall tunnel as smooth as possible so it gave me a chance to try out some new prototype tools we've been testing. We're currently working on a set of universal vice-mount T-dollies that I thought would be perfect to tip the edges of the firewall where transitions into the tunnel. The trick with these is to allow the metal to hang just over the edge of the dolly and use your body hammer to form the metal around the radius of the dolly. The result is a smooth bend in the sheet metal. Look for these to be out sometime in May or June!

    By tipping and rolling the edges on the transmission tunnel transition I also added some additional rigidity to the panel that I could feel instantly after I was done hammering. I decided to test fit the panel again so I could mock up the top panel of the tunnel next. The top panel needed to have the same contour as the opening we cut in the firewall and the only good way to make that was by using an english wheel to roll the contour into a piece of sheet metal. I began by making a pattern to match the cutout in the firewall so that I could check my progress as I went. I used our new prototype Eastwood English Wheel to roll the mild curve into the panel and after a few a minutes I had a piece shaped appropriately.

    I then used a couple clecos to hold the top panel in place. The fitment is pretty good and it should all blend together pretty nicely once it's welded. I still need to tackle the rest of the tunnel and begin mocking up the steering column and brake pedal before I can finally weld the firewall in place.

    Just today I got some steering column parts and a frame mounted brake pedal assembly from Speedway Motors, so I should be able to steer the truck from inside the cab shortly. I've already got a nice chrome Right Stuff Detailing GM mini brake booster and master cylinder sitting on the sidelines ready to mount up once the fabrication is done so I can make Pile House stop too! Stay tuned, things are getting interesting!

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  • Brain Reeves- 1965 Mustang

    "When I was 18 I lost a very dear close friend to a car accident. I purchased a 1965 mustang coupe from her parents that was her car. I m ade a prom ise to m yself that I would build the car in her m em ory. I have kept the car and bounced it from garage to garage for going on 24 years now. It sits in my garage now waiting for me to continue what I had started. In the time I have owned the car I have gotten it down to rolling chasis and collected come parts. However I have also gotten married and fathered three beautiful boys who happen to take m ost of m y tim e and m oney. My wife has been patient with m e and understands the meaning of this car in my life. It's funny but when I talk to friends I have kept in touch with they always ask if I still have the car. My reply is always "of course, I still need to finish it!" Anyway I try to work on it when time and funds permit. Unfortunately that is few and far between. I am at the metal work and body work stage. I need to repair some rust issues and snad and prep the body for paint. So I appeal to your sense of com m itm ent and dedication to honor m e with the prize to com plete m y prom ise to a fallen friend. Thank You for the consideration Brian Reeves To the memory and dedication of Ann "Charlie" Beall. You are gone but not forgotten! Love and miss you every day."

    I'm ready to vote:
    CLICK HERE

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  • Street Rodder Radio and Eastwood Announce 2013 Road Tour Car Build

    For the past two years we've been sponsoring the Street Rodder Road Tour and our Eastwood Summer Classic has been the kickoff event for the eastern leg of the tour. Recently we just inked the deal to once again become the official tools sponsor of the 2013 Street Road Tour build. This year the guys at Honesty Charley's Garage will be building the 2013 road tour car. The base car this year is a 1951 Ford that's in less than ideal shape.

    While at the 2012 SEMA show Brian Brennan of Street Rodder Magazine and Street Rodder Radio interviewed myself about last year's road tour car and we covered what's going into the 2013 car. We've already sent a large care package down south to Honesty Charley's Garage for the 51 Ford, and I'm sure more will be on its way soon. They'll be fabricating patch panels and performing some custom metal work on the car with our Pro Hammer and Dolly Kit, Economy Bead Roller, Versa Bend Metal Brake, Panel Beater Sandbag, and Plastic Metal Forming Mallets, and much more.

    Even though we're "officially" the tools sponsor of this car, the team asked our help in the fight against rust. Since they need to treat and seal many rusty areas on the car, they asked us to send them some of our innovative paints and chemicals. We were happy to oblige. They'll be sealing up and protecting hidden and boxed areas of the '51 Ford with our Internal Frame Coating, and treating just about the entire car and chassis with our famous line of Rust Encapsulator. You can be sure that the car will be free of ANY rust or corrosion; these guys mean business!

    Once the crew gets a little further along on the build they'll need to reassemble the car and turn it back into a roadworthy vehicle. For those mechanical projects they'll be using the full line of Eastwood Hand Tools. They'll be some of the first professionals to get their hands on our new ratchets, sockets, screwdrivers, ratcheting wrenches, aviation metal snips, and anything else a serious "wrencher" needs in their toolbox!

    Check out the full interview at SEMA at the link below. Some of the great personalities in the classic car and hot rod community today stopped by to visit Brian Brennan including Troy Ladd from Hollywood Hot Rods, Corky Coker of Coker Tires, and Brian Downard of Lokar Performance, so it's definitely worth the listen!

    http://www.streetrodderweb.com/radio/

    Watch this space as the build really is just getting started for the 2013 Road Tour Car. We'll be sure to give you some insider information on this years car as things progress!

    -Matt/EW

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