Tag Archives: Chrome

  • Blue Steel 32 Ford Roadster- AMBR Contender 2014

    Every year at SEMA there's always one car that is so over the top and amazingly clean that it blows us away. This year it was a custom 1932 Ford Roadster named "Blue Steel". Sure 32 Fords have been done a million times, but few take it so far that it's close to.. dare we say it... OCD clean? This 32 Ford definitely gives off the high-dollar, high-profile shop build. I was surprised when I got to talking to the guys responsible for the build that they weren't from a big name SOCAL shop, but rather a bunch of friends that built the car in a tractor repair shop over the past year.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Project Pile House Late Summer Update

    Last time I checked in on Project Pile House I had just gotten done welding floor pans in and rebuilding the rotten door jambs. Since then I've been really busy and I have been slacking on my updates here. I have been posting regular updates on Instagram if you want to follow along feel free to check the #pilehouse tag or view the pics on your desktop HERE.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Bay One Customs Cameo SEMA Truck Build : Reassembly and Shiny Things!

    TC and his team at Bay One Customs have been very busy since we last checked in with them. With only 8 weeks to go until the big debut at SEMA 2013, they really need to hustle to finish the truck. They don't plan to fake it like a lot of the cars at the show, this sucker needs to run, drive, AND look good!

    After laying down the special Eastwood Candy Red paint (coming to eastwood.com soon!) on the body panels, TC was nice enough to give us a quick tutorial on how he achieves that DEEP, WET finish on his candy paint jobs. We still can't believe how killer that color looks!

    With the panels all shiny and ready to go together, the team "married" the cab and the chassis and started hooking up the essentials to make this pile of shiny metal a running, driving truck. This includes, exhaust, wiring and electrical, HVAC system, and much more! Oh... and a LOT of shiny chrome bits (what do you expect it IS a SEMA show vehicle!). TC gives us a quick rundown below.

    Bay One has been using a LOT of Eastwood products along the way. TC is a big fan of our stuff, so much so, he likes to share tips and tricks he uses to achieve such amazing results. In the video below TC shows a trick for getting a smooth, satin, UV resistant finish on the wood for the bed of the truck. He also covers applying the candy red to the cab and bed and shows you them mated to the chassis. The vision is really starting to become a reality and everyone involved is extremely excited!

    In the most recent update from TC we're finally able to see the body fully assembled and nearly complete. The back end of this truck is also revealed. TC has an immense amount of time into the bed and tailgate alone to make it true to the original concept design. He pulled parts and cues from a number of Chevy products from this era and we think it probably came out better than if Chevy had done it themselves! Lastly he gives us a sneak peak at his custom license plate bracket modifications. This makes your "hideaway" plate look like child's play!

    Stay tuned, we'll keep feeding you updates as TC works on the truck. We hope to have a full video feature on the truck at SEMA 2013!

      Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Eastwood Project of the Day- Soda Blasting a Valve Cover for Chrome and Powder

    Many of us at Eastwood have numerous projects going on at a time. This is great for a few reasons, one of them is the chance to constantly be testing and using our products. This allows us to make our products better and also gives us experience in the use of our products so we can pass that knowledge on to our customers. We decided to share our small projects we tackle from time to time here on the blog in our Eastwood "Project of the Day" series.

    When you send a part to be professionally painted, powder coated, polished or chromed the majority of the cost is in the prep work required to coat or polish the part. I currently have a project going where a lot of parts need to be chromed. Having items chromed is quite expensive, so I'm doing my best to save some cash by preparing the parts before I send them off. To achieve the ultra-reflective finish associated with chrome; the part must be mirror polished first. Therefore, the smoother and cleaner the part is, the easier it is for the chrome shop to prepare the part for the series of shiny baths. This valve cover is cast aluminum and has had a layer of black paint applied at some point that I needed to remove. Since the surface needs to be mirror polished before chrome, I needed to take care when removing any existing coatings. I chose to use our Small Job Blast Kit with soda because the soda media is delicate enough to remove the old black paint and not damage the surface. This will leave the valve cover as smooth as it was from new and speed things up for the chrome shop and save me some money!

    The nice thing about this job is that setup and clean up is a breeze. The only things I used were an airline, the small job blast kit gun, and the bottle of soda abrasive media. I then cleaned the dust up with a shop vac, and cleaned the valve cover with a soapy water solution, and I was done. If only all of my projects were this quick and easy!

    -Matt/EW

      Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Where did the art go?

    There was a time when car and coach building was more of an artform. Auto manufacturers weren't worried as much about shaping a car to get the best gas mileage, or to fit the most amount of gimmicky junk in it as they could. These were the days when cars had a lot of chrome, brass, gold, and flowing bodywork. You can study a car from the 30's through the 50's for hours if you take the time to think about how much work went into building these cars in an era before computerized, robotic thinga-majiggies built 90% of a vehicle.

    One of my favorite things to observe at shows are the hood emblems from those cars. Each one in itself, is artwork. Many stood as a symbol for the "theme" of the model, or even the car manufacturer. Some of these emblems are still used today in a less elegant form (the Dodge Ram for instance).

    Here are a few of my favorites from a recent show I went to. Even after hitting so many car events over the years, I still find new hood emblems I've never seen before! What are some of your favorites?

      Click Here To Read Full Post...