Tag Archives: Chrome

  • Bay One Customs Cameo SEMA Truck Build : Reassembly and Shiny Things!

    TC and his team at Bay One Customs have been very busy since we last checked in with them. With only 8 weeks to go until the big debut at SEMA 2013, they really need to hustle to finish the truck. They don't plan to fake it like a lot of the cars at the show, this sucker needs to run, drive, AND look good!

    After laying down the special Eastwood Candy Red paint (coming to eastwood.com soon!) on the body panels, TC was nice enough to give us a quick tutorial on how he achieves that DEEP, WET finish on his candy paint jobs. We still can't believe how killer that color looks!

    With the panels all shiny and ready to go together, the team "married" the cab and the chassis and started hooking up the essentials to make this pile of shiny metal a running, driving truck. This includes, exhaust, wiring and electrical, HVAC system, and much more! Oh... and a LOT of shiny chrome bits (what do you expect it IS a SEMA show vehicle!). TC gives us a quick rundown below.

    Bay One has been using a LOT of Eastwood products along the way. TC is a big fan of our stuff, so much so, he likes to share tips and tricks he uses to achieve such amazing results. In the video below TC shows a trick for getting a smooth, satin, UV resistant finish on the wood for the bed of the truck. He also covers applying the candy red to the cab and bed and shows you them mated to the chassis. The vision is really starting to become a reality and everyone involved is extremely excited!

    In the most recent update from TC we're finally able to see the body fully assembled and nearly complete. The back end of this truck is also revealed. TC has an immense amount of time into the bed and tailgate alone to make it true to the original concept design. He pulled parts and cues from a number of Chevy products from this era and we think it probably came out better than if Chevy had done it themselves! Lastly he gives us a sneak peak at his custom license plate bracket modifications. This makes your "hideaway" plate look like child's play!

    Stay tuned, we'll keep feeding you updates as TC works on the truck. We hope to have a full video feature on the truck at SEMA 2013!

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  • Eastwood Project of the Day- Soda Blasting a Valve Cover for Chrome and Powder

    Many of us at Eastwood have numerous projects going on at a time. This is great for a few reasons, one of them is the chance to constantly be testing and using our products. This allows us to make our products better and also gives us experience in the use of our products so we can pass that knowledge on to our customers. We decided to share our small projects we tackle from time to time here on the blog in our Eastwood "Project of the Day" series.

    When you send a part to be professionally painted, powder coated, polished or chromed the majority of the cost is in the prep work required to coat or polish the part. I currently have a project going where a lot of parts need to be chromed. Having items chromed is quite expensive, so I'm doing my best to save some cash by preparing the parts before I send them off. To achieve the ultra-reflective finish associated with chrome; the part must be mirror polished first. Therefore, the smoother and cleaner the part is, the easier it is for the chrome shop to prepare the part for the series of shiny baths. This valve cover is cast aluminum and has had a layer of black paint applied at some point that I needed to remove. Since the surface needs to be mirror polished before chrome, I needed to take care when removing any existing coatings. I chose to use our Small Job Blast Kit with soda because the soda media is delicate enough to remove the old black paint and not damage the surface. This will leave the valve cover as smooth as it was from new and speed things up for the chrome shop and save me some money!

    The nice thing about this job is that setup and clean up is a breeze. The only things I used were an airline, the small job blast kit gun, and the bottle of soda abrasive media. I then cleaned the dust up with a shop vac, and cleaned the valve cover with a soapy water solution, and I was done. If only all of my projects were this quick and easy!


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  • Where did the art go?

    There was a time when car and coach building was more of an artform. Auto manufacturers weren't worried as much about shaping a car to get the best gas mileage, or to fit the most amount of gimmicky junk in it as they could. These were the days when cars had a lot of chrome, brass, gold, and flowing bodywork. You can study a car from the 30's through the 50's for hours if you take the time to think about how much work went into building these cars in an era before computerized, robotic thinga-majiggies built 90% of a vehicle.

    One of my favorite things to observe at shows are the hood emblems from those cars. Each one in itself, is artwork. Many stood as a symbol for the "theme" of the model, or even the car manufacturer. Some of these emblems are still used today in a less elegant form (the Dodge Ram for instance).

    Here are a few of my favorites from a recent show I went to. Even after hitting so many car events over the years, I still find new hood emblems I've never seen before! What are some of your favorites?

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  • Welcome back Impala, you have been gone so long!

    Everyone loves a good project right? But at times there is a point where some are "too far gone". Well with the technology of restoration tools/products and the wealth of information found on the Internet these days; one can rebuild most any car with the right patience and skills. In comes this 1961 Impala Convertible project that we have stumbled across on www.Impalas.net .

    According to the current owner this car spent 20+ years in a ditch before it came into his caring ownership. This car has appeared to have been quite plagued with rust and rot. Also, it  has been in a collision at some point to make things worse.  Along the way he picked up countless donor cars, including a 62 Buick convertible and two 4 door 61 Bel Air donor cars, etc. With the use of those donor cars, some pretty amazing work is being done to save a car that most would have parted out on site. Some of the interesting metal work being done includes converting the one spare Bel Air trunk to an Impala trunk, replacing the rear quarters, windshield frame, cowls, front clip, window channels, dash, and so on and so forth. Basically there isn't going to be a piece of this car that hasn't been gone over (and possibly replaced!) completely along the way. This is no simple job, and takes some dedication! So hats goes off to a dedicated enthusiast, we can't wait to see how it turns out in the end! Please see the complete thread with very informative, detailed pics of the build here: http://www.impalas.net/forums/showthread.php?t=686 .

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