Tag Archives: custom

  • How to shave and metal finish your firewall with Empire Fabrication

    Shaving or smoothing the bodywork on a custom car has been one of the most popular modifications since the beginning. Shaving door handles and trim or side marker holes are the most common things to shave on a project car, but close behind that is smoothing or shaving the firewall. Sean of Empire Fabrication has gotten REALLY good at shaving and smoothing cars. So much so that his finished projects require basically no body filler at all and can be primered and block sanded straight away. Sean recently took the time to snap some photos and give us the rundown on how he tackles a firewall shave project. The donor vehicle is a VW Eurovan that he has already drastically customized. So grab a drink, sit back, and watch how to do the job right with Empire Fabrication.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Scratch building a Ford Hot Rod to Scale- Building a skeleton

    Recently product developer Mark R. decided to build a 30's Ford Hot Rod to scale. The process would be fun and it's going to allow him to test a number of the new Eastwood Metal Fabrication tools and accessories we have coming down the pike. We figured we'd document the process and give you some sneak peaks at new products along the way.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How To Spray your first Wild Kustom Paintjob- Custom Lined, Candy and Flaked Skateboard Deck

    Flake, Pearl, Candy, Lace, and all things flashy are what full blown Kustom Paintjobs are all about. If you want to flex your painting skills and standout with your paint job you'll need to learn the process of custom taping, spaying candy, flake, and pearl. We decided to let Eastwood Tech Mike L. paint a skateboard to show you the basic steps to achieving a wild paint job like the pros do.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Flare a Fender

    A fender flare can add a stylish element to your car that can be a pleasing auto body aesthetic, as well as functional for oversized rims. And the good news is, it is a pretty simple process to add them to your fenders. To flare just about any fender, all you need to do is follow a simple set of steps and use several basic auto body tools. Below we take a look at the best way to flare any steel fender.

    Step #1: Determine Your Spacing

    FenderFlareIMAGE 1Before getting started, you want to first determine how the fender flare is going to be spaced. After initially cutting the fender flare off of the car body, determine the offset of the flare and the spacing you need to ensure accurate flare symmetry on either side of the car. Then, using basic sheet metal, cut one inch long sheet metal strips by whatever width you want the flare to be, whether it be an inch, half an inch, three quarter inch, etc.

    FenderFlareIMAGE 2Using Eastwood's Aluminized Sheet Metal Kit can help you prevent any corrosion that may occur. Make sure to cut the fender on the outside of the edge to preserve the OE edge. The sheet metal pieces you cut will be tacked onto the fender on the top, forward and backward areas of the fender to ensure uniformity for all four fender flares.

    Step #2: Cutting and Spacing the Flare

    FenderFlareIMAGE 3First, cut the outside edge of the fender using a body saw. When cutting, leave the lip at the bottom attached to the body of the car. Now it's time to weld the first sheet metal spacer in place on the top of the cut fender using a MIG welder. During this whole process, it's important to use clamps to hold both the bottom fender lip and the metal spacers in place. Then weld the other two spacers in place and grind them down with an electric grinder and flap discs so they are smooth and uniform with the rest of the fender flare. FenderFlareIMAGE 5 Now, it's time to fill in the spaces between each metal spacer with additional sheet metal pieces. It is important that each of these pieces are cut to fit the spaces in between and outside each of the three metal spacers. Using tin snips will help you shape the metal to those tapering end flare sections. Cut, file or sand each piece manually and/or with a belt sander until it fits each space perfectly. Having a sheet metal kit is very beneficial during this process since it has many of the tools and accessories you need to cut and shape sheet metal. Now, clamp the sheet metal pieces down, weld them to the fender, and grind the welds down until the whole flare is smooth.

    Step #3: Finishing and Painting the Flare

    FenderFlareIMAGE 8Once all the metal is welded onto the flare, clean the whole area with PRE paint prep solution and a clean cloth. The PRE paint prep will help rid the surface of any dirt, wax, polish or grease that may accrue during your work. This step will ensure a quality paint finish. Next, sand and fill all of the areas of the fender you intend to paint. Prime to cover the entire area of the fender and your new fender flare before applying the paint finish – Tech Tip – Eastwood 2K Aerospray Epoxy & Urethane Primers are great for this task. Lastly, choose your matching paint, fill your paint cup, attach it to your HVLP auto spray paint gun, and start applying your finishing coats. Make sure to spray on your paint evenly to ensure that your paint coverage is even on the body of the car.

    So go ahead, and flare your fenders today! For more DIY car tutorials, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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  • Project of the Week- Powder Coating a vintage Mini Bike

    Here at Eastwood we're always working on new products, but we always make sure we're testing products we've offered for quality. Recently JR decided to powder coat a vintage mini bike to show off some of our Hot Coat Powder and test the outcome of our metallic powders.   Click Here To Read Full Post...