Tag Archives: dodge

  • Hot Rod Homecoming 65th Anniversary Show Coverage- Part 1

    It's no secret that the west coast, specifically southern California or "SoCal" has been the hotbed for Hot Rodding. Many of the legendary customizers, race drivers, companies, and magazines called SoCal their home. By far the biggest magazine in the world of hot rodding is the one and only Hot Rod Magazine. They've been around since day one, and even through all of the ups and downs of the automotive world, they're still around, and as strong as ever. This year marked the 65th anniversary since their inception. In celebration, the crew at Hot Rod Magazine invited the entire hot rodding community to come join them at the Pomona Fairgrounds for a "Homecoming". We were already planning a trip to visit them and some of their sister magazines that week, so we stayed the weekend to catch the show and set up a small booth with our friends at Hollywood Hot Rods.

    This wasn't going to be just any car show, the Hot Rod crew dug deep into their little black book and were able to dig out some REALLY important cover and feature cars from the past 65 years. Everyone in attendance were amazed at what crawled out of the woodwork, and we're not just talking cars! Anyone with a keen eye could spot some legends of hot rodding walking there amongst us mortals.

    Saturday we spent the day breezing through the show and taking pictures of some of the cars that immediately caught our eye. We were so overwhelmed that sunday felt like an entirely different show once we dug in and took in all of the cars in attendance. The show also had some really nice "non-feature" cars that were just hitting the public for the first time. We gotta say that the quality of cars in the show were top notch by any standards. You really had to search every corner of the fairplex show grounds to see some of these cars. Check out our gallery below to see some of our favorites from Saturday. We're still digging through pictures and hopefully this week we can have the next batch up!

    Thanks to all that welcomed us East-Coasters into SoCal, showed us around, chatted with us, or stopped by our booth. We hope we can do it again!

    -Matt/EW

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  • Lisa F., Product Marketing Assistant- What Makes Us Tick

    Do you have any projects going right now? What are you building, restoring, or a job you are tackling next? Pretty much everything parked outside my house is a project! Time, garage space and project finances seem to always be spread thin across a twin turbo dodge stealth, a Mitsubishi Evolution, and a Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Building Door Frames to Match the Chop

    It's been a while since we talked about the roof chop on Pilehouse, but I've been doing a lot of boring work on the smashed up old roof getting it satisfactory. Since then I decided to finally finish building the doors to match the roof. I took some pictures as I did the drivers side to show one way to do it, and I did the passenger side an alternative way to show another way you can tackle this project. We shot the video on the passenger side, but in the photos here you can see the other way to go about it.

    Just like chopping the roof down, we needed to take out some height from the top of the door, split it in half, and add some width to it. That's why it's extremely handy to keep original metal that you cut off of the truck. I started by splitting the top of the door in half so we could mock up the two pieces so that they sat where we wanted them to in the door jamb.

    I started with the rear portion and held it in place in the door opening and closed the door until the post met the top of the door I was holding in place. From there I made a mark on the pillar where the 2 parts overlapped. From there I could cut the excess off of the door. In the front of the door I needed to take the extra material out of the top of the door since that was the straightest part of the upper front portion of the door. If at all possibly you always want to take material out of the pillars, doors, etc where the pieces are straight and the most uniform. Cutting them on a curve makes it VERY difficult to piece things back together smoothly and get your angles correct.

    Once the pieces were cut I temporarily tack welded them to the edge of the roof to get them sitting about where I wanted. With the tack welds I could still adjust the parts without them being permanently mounted. This way I could shut the door and line everything up how I wanted.

    Once the front and rear sections of the door were about where I wanted them I grabbed the piece of the door I cut out of the front. This portion of the door was very close in size to the center and only required minor tweaking to get the backside contours to match up.

    From there I was able to tack weld and adjust everything how I wanted and I could weld the seams all together. On the drivers side I hadn't fully cut and ground the drip rail off so I went about mocking up the door pieces. Either one will work, just be sure to use paint stir sticks or similar as spacers to leave room for seals in the door jam. With the doors welded back together the full effect of chopping the roof is visible. I think this mild chop really made Pilehouse look better. My next plans are to customize the hood and build a custom tailgate, so stay tuned for more updates.

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  • Not Your Typical Resto Project...This "Krazy Kar" Has 2 Front Ends!

    This Krazy Kar (shown in 1961) could be steered from either end!

    I'm sure many people have restored 1939 Chevrolets over the years, but back in 1959, two brothers had a different spin on that project.

    Wilfred and Henry Abels from Clay Center, Kansas decided that they wanted to build something special for the 1961 Kansas State Centennial celebration. They already had an old 1939 Chevrolet parked in back of their barn. All they needed was to find a similar car and they would build one vehicle with two front ends welded together, and that could be steered from either end!

    The Abels finally found a front end from a Dodge Power Wagon that was close enough to be usable. After a lot of work spread out over two years, they were ready to drive in the ’61 Centennial parade, where it was well-received, as you might imagine! The Krazy Kar would show up at dozens of county fairs and parades throughout Kansas until 1973, when it went back into the barn.

    Fast forward to 2008, when the Abels family got to work restoring the original restoration, and displayed it in front of the family store during the annual “Piotique City Festival”. After 35 years, Wilfred was able to take one last look at his project before he passed a few years later.

    For the complete fascinating story of the Krazy Kar, click here.

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  • Kevin S., Senior Product Marketing Manager- What Makes Us Tick

    What's your favorite Eastwood product? Why? Eastwood TIG 200 AC/DC welder. Having access to the advanced process of TIG welding at an affordable price is great. I have always wanted a TIG welder in my home shop, but could never justify the expense. The value of the Eastwood TIG 200 AC/DC welder has opened up the door to welding aluminum and stainless for me.  Click Here To Read Full Post...