Tag Archives: eastwood powder

  • How to Prep Metal For Powder Coating

    Much like painting and welding, preparing metal for powder coating is multi step process that must be followed in order to have the best results.  If any of these steps are missed or not done properly your end product will risk having flaws.

    What Can Be Powder Coated?

    During the curing process the part will reach 400+ ºF, this means that only certain materials can actually be coated.  With that said any parts with plastic, rubber, gaskets of any kind and wiring will have to be completely removed before starting to prep the metal.  With that said, anything with moving parts must be taken apart and coated separately, then reassembled after.  It the powder is applied across a moving joint the curing process will lock the two together.  Depending on the type of part you will be powder coating, different levels of disassembly will be required.  For example a valve cover or set or coil spring will not require any disassembly since there are no moving parts.  More complex parts like alternators, Carburetors, and Steering components will require a lot of time devoted to making sure all of the pieces are properly taken apart and sealed.

     

    Preparation Steps

    Step 1

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    First your part must be fully disassembled and any pieces that will not be coated removed.

    Since I will be powder coating these engine brackets, removing all the bolts was the only disassembly needed .

    If, for example, you were powder coating a carburetor, all of the openings must be plugged with rubber plugs to prevent powder from getting into any of the crevasses and openings. Additionally any moving parts must be either removed or taped up using high temp masking tape.  When disassembling complex parts like this its important to take pictures along the way.  Check out this article which talks about the importance of taking pictures during your project.

     

    Step 2

    Photo Nov 06, 11 39 03 AM

    The next step in the process is cleaning the metal.  There are a few methods of doing this but first you always want to remove any dirt or grease by using Eastwood PRE Painting Prep, spray a liberal amount on a rag and wipe down the surface of the part.  this will remove dirt, oil, grease and grime from the outside of the part.  During this step you will not need to worry about removing any paint or other coatings that might be on the surface, this will be dealt with next.

     

    Step 3

    Photo Nov 06, 5 36 48 PM

    This step will take care of any coatings that are currently on the part.  By far most effective method would be to Media Blast the part but if you do not have access to a blaster a good sanding with 80-120 grit Sand Paper or a Flap Disc on an Angle Grinder should be able to handle the job of stripping off any coatings on the metal.

     

    Step 4

    Photo Nov 06, 6 07 05 PM

    Now that any previous coatings are removed, use a blow gun to remove any dust. Instead of wiping the part down, you should completely spray down the part with PRE Painting Prep and then let it air dry.  If you were to wipe it down with a rag there is a potential that contaminants on the rag or towel could be transferred to the part.

    Step 5

    If you want all of the exposed metal coated then you can skip this step.  For most parts there are certain areas that you will want bare metal to remain.  In order to mask off these areas the use of a special type of masking tape is needed.  Paint Masking Tape will not hold up in the high temperatures that the oven will reach.  High Temp Masking Tape is the answer to this dilemma, coming in sizes from 1/8" to 2" this tape will be able to cover any size area needed.

    Just make sure you don't touch the part with your bare hands it is ready for powder coating.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

     

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  • PowderCoat It Black

    I'm building a few projects at once, and it seems just about every one of them needed some sort of black powder coating done before I could start reassembly. I took this past weekend and cranked up my favorite Rolling Stones song and tackled my growing pile of parts for black powder treatment.

    There were 2 steps to this process. The first was cleaning the parts with the media blaster. Since I had some large parts that wouldn't fit in the blasting cabinet, I decided to use a mix of soda blast media and aluminum oxide in the dual blaster to quickly remove the years of paint, rust, and grime on these parts.

    An important tip is to sift your media through a strainer before it goes into the blaster. This is your last chance to make sure that there aren't any pieces of oversized media that weren't broken down enough. The smallest rogue piece could clog the blaster and cause headaches! This is extremely important if the media isn't high quality or has been stored in a questionable area where condensation could have gotten to the media. Either way it's a good habit to form. Sometimes you'd be surprised at what you catch!

    Once I blasted all of the parts I treated them with Eastwood After Blast to give them one final cleaning process and optimum powder adherence.

    The fun part of this process was finally here, and I started by grabbing my Dual Voltage HotCoat Gun and doing a layer of high gloss black powder followed by hot flocking a layer of ultra gloss clear powder over the parts. This combo is one of my favorites. It really gives an ultra-deep, shiny look to the black that is hard to beat!

    Once that batch had cured I moved on to do some engine brackets and other items in black wrinkle. This powder leaves a nice O.E. looking finish that is subtle, yet still clean.

    After all of this, I can say I am excited to bolt these freshly coated parts onto each car, I just need to find the time! We want to see what you are powder coating, feel free to share your photos on the Eastwood Powder Coating Forum!

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