Tag Archives: Eastwood

  • Get Spraying with your New Paint Gun, Quick and Easy!

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    New Paint Gun? Not Sure What To Do Next?

    Here is a Quick and Easy guide so you can start spraying your project in no time, you might be surprised just how easy it is.

    To start things off there are a few pieces of equipment you will need before you get to painting.  These items are required and you will not be able to continue without them.  In addition to your new paint gun you'll need:

    1. Air Compressor (Preferably one that exceeds the minimum CFM of the paint gun)
    2. Air Filter, can be disposable or Wall Mounted Unit (This will make or break the overall outcome of the paint.  Even a little moisture or oil can ruin the paint)
    3. Gun Mounted Air regulator
    4. Lacquer Thinner (Used to clean the gun after Painting)

     

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    Air Fitting and Regulator

    Now you're Ready to set up the gun.  Depending on which paint gun you have, it may not have an air coupler attached to the bottom.  All you need is a little teflon tape (found at any hardware store) wrapped around the threads, First screw on the regulator then screw on the air fitting and tighten using the supplied wrench. This will ensure an air tight seal to the paint gun.

    !QUICK TIP! 

    !WHEN WRAPPING TAPE AROUND THREADS REMEMBER TO WRAP CLOCKWISE, THE SAME DIRECTION THE THREADS TIGHTEN.  IF REVERSED THE AIR COUPLER WILL UNWIND THE TAPE AS IT IS SCREWED ON!

     

    Setting Air Pressure

    Next you'll need to adjust the air flow to the gun.  This is where the gun mounted regulator comes into play.  On the box or in the manual of your gun there will be a recommended air pressure the gun operates most efficiently.(ex. 30 PSI)  Completely open the air flow adjustment on the gun and do not touch it, from now on the regulator will control the air flow through the gun. After your compressor is turned on and filled, connect the gun without the paint cup attached and pull the trigger completely open.  You will need to the adjust the regulator to match the recommended pressure for your gun. (ex. so the needle reads 30 PSI) Now that you have set the regulator unhook the gun.

     

    Fan Size and Fluid Adjustment

    This part can be tricky since the material you are spraying dictates the how big the fan size should be, how far away to hold the gun, and the overlap. Look to the packaging of the material you will be spraying to find the recommended values.  As a general tip, open the fluid adjustment all the way so the trigger can be fully engaged. If you are worrying about running the paint turn the fluid control in and slowly bring it back out as you get more comfortable spraying.

     

    Mixing Paint

    This also depended on the Material being sprayed but generally the mix ratios are printed on the container or packaging of the material you will be using. Attach the paint cup and pour in the paint.  You're almost ready to paint!

    Remember to attach the paint cup and pour the paint into gun without the air line attached to the gun.  It is easy to bump the trigger and accidentally spray paint where you don't want it.

    Attaching the Air Line

    After the paint is in the gun and the lid is on tight you are ready to attach the air line and get to painting.  Make sure you have a panel or piece of cardboard to use to test the pattern of the paint.  This is when you will use the fluid control and the fan adjustment to get the desired pattern for the material.

     

    Get to Painting!

    There you go now you can start painting all of your projects with you own paint gun.  At first it can be difficult to remember to do all of the steps in order but it wont take long to become second nature.

    DONT FORGET!

    Cleaning you gun is just as important as setting up to paint!  All you need is an empty metal paint can and some lacquer thinner and its that easy.

    After you are done painting detach the gun from the air line.  Then Empty the paint cup into the paint can. Now using a funnel or a squeeze bottle (I'VE FOUND THAT A CONTACTS SOLUTION BOTTLE WORKS BEST) filled with thinner, hold the paint gun over the paint can with the trigger pulled and pour the thinner into the gun where the paint gun attaches.  The thinner will run through the gun and out the nozzle.  Continue to pour thinner until it comes out of the gun clear.  Make sure you clean the gun immediately after painting so the paint does not dry in the gun.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future article or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to send us an email.

    jrees@eastwood.com or  mmurray@eastwood.com

     

    - James R. / EW

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  • How to Diagnose your Sick Plasma Cutter

    What does this mean to you? That small, intense plasma beam is extremely powerful and can cut through metal with ease. This also means it can wear out consumables. We get calls from time to time about customers that have had issues with their plasma cutters. The symptoms are often that the plasma cutter won't initiate an arc on the metal, or the arc will start and stop erratically while you're cutting. I decided to put together a few causes for those sort of issues. Hopefully one of them can save you time when diagnosing an issue with your plasma cutter.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Step up your Hammer Game! Using Intermediate Body hammers and Dollies

    Back when cars were made of heavy metal and had lots of beautiful curves guys took the time to repair a fender rather than just replace it. Any good metal worker will tell you that you need to match the hammer and dolly as close as possible with the shape of your panel you're working on. When you're working on a curvy car like something from the late 1930's through the 1950's you will be hard pressed to find a flat panel on the vehicle. This means that you will need to use tools to match. Back in those days the selection of specialty hammers were vast, some being specifically used for one type of car or type of repair!  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Fit Seat Sliders to Your Hot Rod Seat

    The older the car you're working on, the harder it can be to find usable parts you need. This becomes increasingly difficult when you get into cars that were short production or year runs. The iconic 1932 Ford is the most covenanted cars to build a hot rod out of. Being that they are a one year only body style, parts get expensive quick (especially original parts!). The seat slider mechanisms for an original '32 Ford seat are as rare as hens teeth and command a pretty penny when you do come across one complete! Recently my friend Ace asked me to help with the task of getting his reupholstered original seat to bolt into the car AND slide easily. I decided to take some photos along the way and show our low-budget (and fairly low tech) fix.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Ditch Those Leaky Header Joints

    After you've been building and modifying cars for a while there's some things that you become pretty particular about. It could be just how you like something to look or function, or just an extra step you take to save yourself headaches in the future. One of mine is an exhaust system that's leak-free and sounds good. I've had bad luck over the years of header unions leaking over time. It seems either they crack at the welds or they just fit poorly and leave much to be desired when fitting the rest of the exhaust.   Click Here To Read Full Post...