Tag Archives: eastwoodco

  • Hands on Cars Episode 1- How to Inspect and Evaluate a Project Car

    The first episode of Hand on Cars, from Eastwood and Kevin Tetz, body work expert, paint wizard and all around car guy. In the first episode Kevin takes you through the process of inspecting a prospective project car before buying it. The car in question? One of the nearly quarter million 1978 Camaros Chevy built, but this one is a Z28 which makes it one of only about 50,000.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Complex Rust Patch Panel Made Easy

    At times rust repair can be ultra simple; cut the old rust out, cut a square of fresh metal and weld it in. But those repairs aren't usually as frequent as we'd like. Rust seems to like to creep into a curved area or into a body line that takes more care to repair. I recently decided to tackle a large rusty area of the rear portion of the floor on Project Pile House.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Channel A Ford Model A

    Back in the late 1940's-1960's it was pretty easy to distinguish if a hot rod in a magazine was built on the east coast or on the west. One of the big differences is how the profile and stance of the car differed. An "east coast hot rod" was easily identifiable by its low ride height and body channeled pretty hard over the chassis without chopping or lowering the roof. It seems as the years went on guys were channeling and lowering their cars more and more until there was almost no ground clearance and no headroom from the raised floor.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How To Retrofit Modern Gauges in Your Classic

     A retro looking dash for a 60's Chevy truck will cost you about $400+, that's a lot to spend on just the dash.  Depending on your gauge layout there is another affordable option that will not only retain a classic original look, it will also allow the use of modern gauges.  In this article I'll show you how to retrofit modern gauges into an original cluster by only making a few minor modifications to the factory hardware.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Keep Metal from Warping While Bead Rolling

    If you have a bead roller, and you try to add a wide or deep bead to a thin piece of metal; or multiple beads to the same piece, you will find the metal starts to deform. You may get perfect beads in the piece you are working on, but it suddenly looks like a metal potato chip. That is because the bead roller does not necessarily stretch the metal as it presses beads into it. If you have an English wheel you can fix this problem before you begin. This problem is especially bad when rolling beads that don’t go all the way to the edge, or rolling different length beads in the same panel. Follow along as we show you a simple way to keep your panel straight when bead rolling.  Click Here To Read Full Post...