Tag Archives: fabrication

  • 2014 Eastwood SEMA Hands-On Award Winners

    Each year we blow up our social media feeds with our favorite vehicles from SEMA. This year we decided we'd take it a step further and give the owners and builders of some of our favorite vehicles notoriety for their hard work. After some brainstorming the Eastwood "Hands-On" Awards were born. The idea behind these awards are to recognize some of the standout vehicles from the show. We judged on a number of factors from quality of work, execution of concept, and just outright ridiculousness of the finished product. Really the car needed to have something "special" to catch our eyes and earn the award. We'll admit we leaned heavily on the smaller shops and DIY builders that didn't have a million dollar dream team of employees and tools to finish the car, there's plenty of awards out there for those guys!   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Flare a Fender

    A fender flare can add a stylish element to your car that can be a pleasing auto body aesthetic, as well as functional for oversized rims. And the good news is, it is a pretty simple process to add them to your fenders. To flare just about any fender, all you need to do is follow a simple set of steps and use several basic auto body tools. Below we take a look at the best way to flare any steel fender.

    Step #1: Determine Your Spacing

    FenderFlareIMAGE 1Before getting started, you want to first determine how the fender flare is going to be spaced. After initially cutting the fender flare off of the car body, determine the offset of the flare and the spacing you need to ensure accurate flare symmetry on either side of the car. Then, using basic sheet metal, cut one inch long sheet metal strips by whatever width you want the flare to be, whether it be an inch, half an inch, three quarter inch, etc.

    FenderFlareIMAGE 2Using Eastwood's Aluminized Sheet Metal Kit can help you prevent any corrosion that may occur. Make sure to cut the fender on the outside of the edge to preserve the OE edge. The sheet metal pieces you cut will be tacked onto the fender on the top, forward and backward areas of the fender to ensure uniformity for all four fender flares.

    Step #2: Cutting and Spacing the Flare

    FenderFlareIMAGE 3First, cut the outside edge of the fender using a body saw. When cutting, leave the lip at the bottom attached to the body of the car. Now it's time to weld the first sheet metal spacer in place on the top of the cut fender using a MIG welder. During this whole process, it's important to use clamps to hold both the bottom fender lip and the metal spacers in place. Then weld the other two spacers in place and grind them down with an electric grinder and flap discs so they are smooth and uniform with the rest of the fender flare. FenderFlareIMAGE 5 Now, it's time to fill in the spaces between each metal spacer with additional sheet metal pieces. It is important that each of these pieces are cut to fit the spaces in between and outside each of the three metal spacers. Using tin snips will help you shape the metal to those tapering end flare sections. Cut, file or sand each piece manually and/or with a belt sander until it fits each space perfectly. Having a sheet metal kit is very beneficial during this process since it has many of the tools and accessories you need to cut and shape sheet metal. Now, clamp the sheet metal pieces down, weld them to the fender, and grind the welds down until the whole flare is smooth.

    Step #3: Finishing and Painting the Flare

    FenderFlareIMAGE 8Once all the metal is welded onto the flare, clean the whole area with PRE paint prep solution and a clean cloth. The PRE paint prep will help rid the surface of any dirt, wax, polish or grease that may accrue during your work. This step will ensure a quality paint finish. Next, sand and fill all of the areas of the fender you intend to paint. Prime to cover the entire area of the fender and your new fender flare before applying the paint finish – Tech Tip – Eastwood 2K Aerospray Epoxy & Urethane Primers are great for this task. Lastly, choose your matching paint, fill your paint cup, attach it to your HVLP auto spray paint gun, and start applying your finishing coats. Make sure to spray on your paint evenly to ensure that your paint coverage is even on the body of the car.

    So go ahead, and flare your fenders today! For more DIY car tutorials, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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  • How to Build a Custom Pneumatic Workbench using Eastwood tools

    If you're a motorhead it's in your blood to always be building, tinkering, and improving upon mechanical things. Eastwood product manager Mark R. is no different, but he likes to take things to the extreme sometimes. Recently Mark built a new garage and was building the shop with new work benches that allowed him to maximize the usable space he had in shop....  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Custom Scratch Built Bed DIY for Project Pile House

    Project Pile House has been an ever-evolving project and like many projects, things start small and spiral out of control and next thing you know you're detailing the inside of your glove box hinges! Luckily I'm not quite that OCD about my vehicles (yet), but Pile House is now more than just a thrown-together junkyard parts runner like I originally planned. It's turned into a full blown custom and not much on the truck is original or untouched. After getting the cab, dash, hood, etc. all smoothed out and "roughed in", the original patched together bed and fenders was bothering the crap out of me every time I looked at it. The fenders looked like boat trailer fenders and were more roughed up than a boxer after a title fight, while the bed itself wasn't much better. I decided to start dreaming up a subtle custom bed.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Notch Tubing for a Perfect Fit Every Time

    Tube Notching
    By: Blake Robinson

    With tools commonly used by chassis shops becoming more affordable and available these days, many racers are taking on fabrication projects themselves in their own garages. These skills are not going to happen overnight, but once you become familiar with your equipment and the materials that you are using, you can be fabricating like a pro in no time.

    Notching or fish mouthing are terms used to describe how one tube has the profile of the tube it will be welded against removed from it, this produces a semi-circular notch that's a major contributor to a strong weld joint. This process can be achieved by using a lathe, grinder, end mill, saw, or numerous other methods you can find on the internet.

    We have had great results using products from The Eastwood Company on our “Getting Back on Track” Camaro and wanted to share the process we are using with other Eastwood, “Do It Yourselfers”.

    tubernotcher1

    Product: Tubing Notcher and Hole Saw Kit (Item #12739)

    First off remember that the more accurate your measurements are, the better fitment you will have. Start by marking the center line on the tube to be notched. A second mark should be made on the obtuse angle side where the two tubes intersect.

    tubernotcher2

    The Eastwood notcher is adjustable up to 60 degrees, with the baseline 90 degrees being at 0 degrees on the notcher.

    Measure the angle on the acute side of the tube and write it down. In our case 60 degrees. The notcher would need to be set at 30 degrees to achieve our desired angle. (this number was found by subtracting 60 from 90)

    tubenotcher3

    After marking your tube and finding the notcher angle, it is best to cut off any excess tube. Leaving the excess tube only makes the cut harder to do and basically it will wear out your hole saw faster.

    Quick tip: before cutting your tube, use this rule. If the notcher angle is 0 to 44 degrees, add a 1/4 of the diameter of the tube to the intersecting line mark before cutting it. (this applies on a standard 90 degree notch as well, since the notcher is set at 0 degrees)

    If the notcher angle is 45 degrees or larger, then cut the tube at the intersecting line mark. This practice will allow you to always have sufficient material to help spread the load on the joint. With the tube cut to proper length and the notcher angle set, we can place our tube in the notcher.

    tubernotcher4

    Place the center line mark at 90 degrees in relation to the center of the hole saw. Then place the edge of the hole saw on the intersecting line mark for a notch angle of 0 to 44 degrees or at the edge of the tube for notch angles 45 degrees or larger.

    With our notch now completed, a test fit is done.

    tubernotcher5

    Before welding your tube, I would recommend that you remove any sharp edges from your notch.

    To learn more about me and my build, visit:

    http://www.awalkwithblake.com/

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