Tag Archives: filler

  • Applying Filler and Glazing Putty Really Is Easy - Quick Tip


    One of the scariest aspects of vehicle restoration is body work, especially when it comes to filler and sanding.  The worst thing to do is avoid it until the end, then be forced to pay someone else to get the work done.  With help from Eastwood you'll, learn all the correct steps to basic body work, save money, and feel more accomplished in the end.


    Pic 1

    Above you'll see the small dent that I'll be repairing, very similar to a door ding you may get in a parking lot.


    Pic 2

    1. First clean the area you will be repairing, use PRE or acetone to remove any contaminants from the panel.


    Photo Aug 06, 12 05 14 PM

    2. If necessary use a Hammer and Dolley and rough out any dents.  Depending on the severity of the dent this may not be required.  Filler should not be applied more than 1/4" thick, any more and there is a risk it will crack.  With that said, any damage less than 1/4" deep may not need to be hammered out.


    Pic 3

    Pic 4

    3. Sand the area about 5 inches on all sides of the dent with a 80 Grit Sanding Disc on a DA Sander. During this step do not worry about getting the area completely smooth, just remove the paint to expose bare metal around the dent. If you don't have a DA Sander, a 120 Grit Flap Disc on an Angle Grinder can be used.  (Be careful, Flap Discs tend to remove a lot of material, very quickly.)

    Pic 5

    4. Using 80 Grit Sand Paper, hand sand the edges of the paint removed area so there is a smooth transition from clear, to base coat, to primer, then to bare metal.  Do not use anything finer than 80 Grit because the sanding scratches allow the filler to mechanically bond to the panel.


    Pic 6

    5. Mix and apply Contour Body Filler, make sure to use even pressure while applying.  This will reduce the need to go back and apply more after you have sanded the first layer.  While mixing make sure to follow the correct mixing ratio.  If too much hardener is added you will not have enough time to effectively apply the filler evenly.  Additionally make sure to use something other than cardboard to mix on.  Small cardboard fibers can get into the filler and contaminate the mix.  If you don't have Quick Sheets, take a 1'x1' piece of sheet aluminum and bend one side 2" up to 90º.  File the edges smooth and now you have a reusable mixing board that wont rust.


    Pic 7 Pic 8

    6. Use 80 Grit PSA on a Sanding Block for initial shaping, then 120 Grit PSA for finer smoothing. Then use an Blow Gun to remove sanding dust. During this step do not worry about getting the surface perfectly smooth, Glazing Putty is still to be applied.


    Pic 9

    7.  Wipe down the panel with PRE or acetone to remove any contaminants and oils.


    Pic 10 Pic 11

    8.  Mix Contour Glazing Putty making sure to follow the correct mixing ratios like stated above.  Glazing Putty should be applied very thin because it's purpose is to level any small imperfections still in the panel after the filling process.


    Pic 12

    9. Sand down the putty in an "X" pattern using 180 Grit PSA on a Sanding Block to get your final finish.


    Pic13 Pic 14

    10.  Blow the sanding dust off using a Blow Gun, then spray the panel with a heavy coat of PRE. The heavy coat will help you detect imperfections.  If the repair looks good wipe it down with a prep rag and you are ready to prime and paint.


    Unless you are a pro, sanding blocks are the go to tool when leveling filler.  You may see others using a DA Sander but this takes a lot of time and practice.


    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future article or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.


    - James R/EW


      Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Leading a Body Panel The Gene Winfield Way.

    Only a few guy from the golden age of kustomizing and hot rodding are still with us, and even less are still working on cars. One of the best is Gene Winfield and even today, well into his 80's he's still traveling the world kustomizing old cars and teaching classes about metal shaping, leading, and anything you want to know about custom cars. I was lucky enough to catch up with him at one of his recent metal working seminars to get the process he uses to apply lead to a panel.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Eastwood Retail Outlet Hosts Patch Panel Training Class

    We've found that most car guys and gals are "hands on" learners. Sure you can read all the tech articles and watch all the Youtube videos in the world, but putting in the time practicing is where most of us really learn. We recently started holding small tech seminars where we let our customers learn from the professionals and get their hands dirty in the process.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Street Rodder Road Tour 51 Ford Custom- More Metal Work, Filler, and sanding.. lots of it!

    The crew at Honesty Charley and Street Rodder Magazine have been doing a great job of keeping the 2013 Road Tour car under wraps. We've been bugging them for a while for some teasers and they finally shot us a few photos to keep us enticed.

    As we mentioned in previous posts, this car has had a lot of rust repair done already and equally as much custom work done. The work continues as they are whipping up some panels for the car using their Eastwood Shrinker Stretcher Set and Plastic Metal Shaping Mallets to build some panels that needed some shape built into them. Who can guess what part they're building in the photos below?!

    While some of the guys are working on some final metal fabrication, the rest of the team are starting on the body work in the areas they customized and repaired already. The tedious job of block sanding the car has been made a little easier with the use of Soft Sander Sanding Blocks and the Adjustable Flexible Sanding Blocks. The car is moving along quickly and we hear it should be getting some primer and color any day now. As soon as we smuggle some pics of the car in color you'll be the first to see it! Stay tuned!

      Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Finish your Welds with Seam Sealer

    The guys over at Bay One Customs are working on all sorts of high end projects in their shop and even though quality is priority #1, sometimes there are tricks they use to save some time.

    In this recent tech article they show you how to quickly smooth and blend welds on a chassis using Eastwood Self Leveling Seam Sealer. Check out the video below and the full story in the link above. Stay tuned for more tips from the guys over at Bay One Customs!

      Click Here To Read Full Post...