Tag Archives: Hot coat

  • Parking lot Gems

    As the weather gets nicer, we find ourselves driving our projects (both finished and unfinished) to work. I love walking through our parking lot occasionally and checking out some of the neat rides we regularly have parked here on a nice warm day! Below is 2 I spotted yesterday and thought everyone might enjoy.

    First up is one of our "R&D" guys, Mark Robidoux. When he isn't brainstorming, testing, and designing; you can see him cruising around in this fully restored beauty that he built from the ground-up in 1991. For those not familiar, this is a 1968 Camaro Convertible. Mark replaced just about every body panel with new as he was putting it together, as with most of us.. he didn't want to have to restore this car twice!

    Powering this beauty is a rebuilt original 327cid motor. Some highlights to this power plant are: port/polished 202 heads, balanced rotating internals, performance Cams, etc.  Years later, Mark designed and perfected our extremely popular HotCoat Powder Coating system. As with anyone here at Eastwood at the time, Mark went "hog-wild" and powdercoated most anything he could fit in a "household" oven. Using a number of our Standard Hot Coat Colors he coated all suspension components and even went as far as disassembling the transmission and cylinder heads and powder coating them! 70,000 miles later and this restoration is still looking as fresh as it did the day Mark finished it!

    Next up is Nick Capinski our "Beetle Guy". The day I took these pics he had driven his 1975 Super Beetle Convertible. Nick repainted this car himself a number of years ago. He used our full line of Sandpaper/Abrasive Discs. Then to smooth out any minor imperfections Nick found the Evercoat Z-Grip Body Filler went on quite easily and was a treat to sand out. Along any body seams our Seam Sealer Kit was used to seal and protect those joints/seams in the body and chassis. Lastly, Nick gave the engine bay a nice look by applying Eastwood's Underhood Black.

    As you can see this beautiful spring day, convertibles seemed to be the trend here in our employee lot! Stay tuned for more cool rides that roll through Eastwood this summer!

      Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Brake parts need love too!

    As I mentioned in my introductory post, I have a 1976 VW Rabbit project that I am building from the ground up. This car is going to be built with a heavy vintage motorsport "feel", but still in the end, it will be a show car and most everything is going to be gone over and polished, cleaned, chromed and powder coated. One thing people often neglect to restore when building a car is brake parts and associated bits hidden behind the wheel. Since I will be buying new brake calipers, I decided I would clean and powder coat the carriers ahead of time. I figured I'd post some photos along the way of some steps I did for the tech geeks like myself, and also to prove to friends and family I actually do work on my 76 Rabbit more than once every 2 years! (I can hear your laughs from here Dad!)

    First step when dealing with old parts that are so close to the road like this, is to clean all of that thick grease, dirt and road grime off of the part. This part had obviously been victim to a couple of ripped CV boots and thus had a few layers of hardened grease on them. You wanna scrape the part with a screwdriver or something similar to get the bigger "chunks" off first. Next I hit the carriers with some of our exclusive Eastwood Chassis Clean . Our chassis clean is a very aggressive cleaner that even removes heavy baked-on brake dust and grease. I just sprayed the part liberally with the handy aerosol can. As you can see in the pictures it just washes the grime off and leaves a "clean" (do not mistake for blasted "clean") surface!

    After getting these parts degreased pretty well. I next dropped them in our blasting cabinet. I decided to use some of our Aluminum Oxide Blast Media to clean the carriers. Since I cleaned the parts with our chassis clean before blasting, the carriers blasted clean quite easily.  After both brackets were blasted, I washed and cleaned them with our PRE Painting Prep to get any and all left over dirt or grease off of the part.

    Since these parts were cast, I decided to pre-heat these items at 400 degrees to bake out any additional grease or chemicals that still may be lurking in the metal and could eventually cause "outgassing". After 20 minutes I took the carriers out and immediately sprayed them Semi-Gloss Black with our increasingly popular Dual Voltage Hot Coat Gun . With the part being pre-heated it makes the powder seem to almost adhere a bit better. You may even begin to see a bit of "flow out" of the powder as the powder lays on the parts (the finish will begin to go from the dull "powder" to a "wet" type finish). After I got a nice even coat on both parts, I took them back to the oven and cured them at 400 degrees again until the powder flowed out nicely. After pulling them out and hanging them to cool, I got to relax and admire the nice glossy black brake parts ready to be mated to some new brake calipers!

    I by no means am a professional at powder coating and found the dual voltage gun to be quite easy to use. In fact, I was able to manipulate the amount of powder coming out of the gun depending on the pressure I had on the trigger (vs. some other guns I've used where it is either "off" or "full blast").  Hopefully some of my fellow hobbyists out there will be inclined to take up powder coating their own parts after seeing how fairly simple the process is!

      Click Here To Read Full Post...