Tag Archives: impact gun

  • Disassembling A Chevy 350 Small Block V8 (SBC) With Eastwood Tools

    We're always elbow deep in projects here at Eastwood, and while tearing down an original 350 SBC (small block v8 Chevy engine) we decided to document the process. Since the engine had never been apart before, we decided it would be a great test for our Eastwood Air Tools and our new, growing line of Eastwood Hand Tools. Along the way we snapped a few shots of the process.

    The engine after a good wash with the electric power washer and some Eastwood Chassis Kleen

    We put the Eastwood Twin Hammer Composite Impact Gun to the test removing the original Chevrolet/GM head bolts.

    With the heads removed and the cylinders cleaned, we can check the short block for any damage to the cylinder walls, cam, etc. before deciding if we want to send this off to the machine shop for a full rebuild, or just a DIY ball hone and refresh.

    The disassembly took about 30 minutes with the help of these new Eastwood tools and sure put a beating on them! Now we have to decide how far we want to Hot Rod this ol' 350 engine!

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  • Eastwood Dad John S.- What we want for Fathers Day!

    Fathers Day is fast approaching and we have loads of great Tools and Fathers Day Sale Items ready for you to wow your dad with. We made up a quick questionnaire for a few of our Eastwood Dads about the celebration that is Dad!

    Meet John S. He is our E-Commerce Marketing Analyst and handles our eBay, Amazon, etc stores. He just so happens to be a motorhead AND a great Dad! Check out what John had to say in response to our questions below.

    Tell us about your pride and joy(s) (your kids of course!)-

    I have a 17 year old son that just got his driver’s license. Now I have an excuse to buy another car. I have a daughter that just turned 12 years old. She likes to attend the local cruise nights with me. She also has her own collection of Hot Wheels Dune Buggies.

    2. What would you prefer for Fathers Day, a new pair of socks, a tie, or tools and why?

    I would prefer to get a new tool as a gift. I am not the type that wears a lot of ties and I would rather buy my socks. You can never have too many tools. I would enjoy getting a set of the Sunex Impact Sockets since I find myself reaching for the impact wrench and using chrome sockets too often (which is a big no-no!).

    3. Did you get your love for cool vehicles with engines from your dad? Any fond memories of your dad and you working together?

    My Dad owned his own garage. He would also work on cars at home almost every night. Some of the cars that stick in my mind that he would work on was a Red 1969 428 Mach 1 and a 1953 Corvette. I remember he was always buying cars and fixing them up. It seemed like we owned a new car every month. I went to work with him when I was 15 years old.

    4. If you could hand down any tools from your collection down to your kids, which would they find the most useful?

    Since it seems like they are always asking for screwdrivers I guess that would have to be it. I can never find my screwdrivers; this would be a nice gift for Father’s Day.

    GearWrench Ratcheting Wrenches

    5. What tool do you reach for the most when working around the garage or house?

    Recently I purchased a ratcheting wrench set we just started to offer. It is amazing how much easier it is to use a ratcheting wrench over a standard one. I don’t know how I managed without them all these years.

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  • Video- Installing New ProForged Suspension and Custom Front Air Suspension

    We know everyone loves videos as well as pictures, so to supplement Part 2 of our Front Suspension Project we decided to show you how we went about installing the new front Proforged suspension and steering parts, as well as the custom air ride suspension in this video. Although it looks pretty straight forward to build and install in the video, I must have had the front suspension apart at least 5-10 times! Enjoy the video and make sure to follow our next episode where we show you how we built a new set of running boards from scratch!

    -Matt/EW

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  • Rebuilding the front suspension with a custom twist Part 1- Front air ride on a Chevy S10

    After I got the custom rear air suspension built for Project Pile House, I could now move on to the front suspension. The rear was relatively easy since there was a ton of room under the bed, but the front isn't so easy. After some research on mini truck websites and the S10 forums, I found that most guys suggested upgrading to the larger 2600 series air bags in the front when you are planning a V8 drivetrain (as I am). The 2500's apparently require much more air to get the truck up to an acceptable ride height and driving the truck at those high pressures makes the ride very harsh. Ideally for the best of both worlds you want the vehicle to ride at a mid-range pressure that will give you a nice ride, but still handle well. The downside is that the bag is obviously larger and requires a bit more modification to the spring pocket to fit.

    I began by disassembling the front suspension, you can see above it was definitely time to address the front steering and suspension components on this chassis! I started the job by removing the tie rods out of the steering knuckle. Many struggle dropping the ball joints and popping the tie rod out of the knuckle when doing this job. I was taught a trick long ago that makes the job really easy.

    What you want to do is remove the nut from the tie rod (or ball joint) and clean off the outside of the pocket where the tie rod is seated. Look for a casting mark where the knuckle was formed. Some vehicles (like this one) it's a flat area, while others it's just a rough raised line. You then take a large hammer (I like to use my 5 pound sledge), and take one REALLY good swing at the pocket; aiming directly for that casting mark you previously found. If you have good aim and swing hard enough, this will shock the conjoined parts loose and the tie rod or ball joint will be free enough that you can pull them out by hand. Sometimes the tie rod will even just fall right out. This is a great trick to show off to your friends and has saved me loads of time over the years.

    After knocking the tie rod out, I moved on to removing the bolts holding the shock in place. I then used a jack to compress the coil spring and slowly dropped the jack down relieving the pressure off of the spring. With the spring pressure relieved, I could remove the spindle, control arms, and other steering and suspension parts. This procedure was a good test for the new Eastwood 1/2" Composite Impact Gun. Even with the extra long air hose we have running to this side of the shop (can cause a pressure drop), it performed flawlessly removing bolts that probably haven't been touched since the chassis was newly assembled!

    With the old suspension out, I now could start on the front air ride fabrication. The nice thing about these larger bags is that they give a ton of lift when aired up, but when fully compressed they are probably a 1/3 of the size of the stock coil spring. For fun I sat the two next to each other before I began the job. Talk about a huge difference in height!

    That's it for the first part of this tech series, stay tuned for our next entry where I will show you how we mated the air bags to the stock suspension and chassis. Then we clean and detailed it all with some help from some Eastwood chassis coatings!

    -Matt/EW

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  • Sneak Peak of New Products

    Here at Eastwood we are constantly working to get new tools, chemicals, and "stuff" to help you "Do the Job Right". The other day was like Christmas in September with some sample "final production" products arriving from our factories. I decided to snap two behind the scenes shots for you! Here we have a few handy tools (Impact Gun, Body Saw, Air Shears) from our complete air tool line launching shortly, and one of our new improved Tumblers! Keep an eye on our Hot New Items Page for the newest Eastwood products!

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