Tag Archives: Live Feed

    • Eastwood Basics to Metal Buffing Tech Demo Q&A Answers

      We recently held a live tech demo on the basics to buffing metal. I gave some insight on the basics, tips, tricks, and safety when buffing. We had a great response for the Q&A and ran out of time to answer all of the questions. I wanted to answer all questions we missed live, so below are the answers for any we missed. Thanks for watching and drop us a line if you have an idea for another live tech demo! -Matt/EW

      Datest41- How do you take pits out of chrome plated pot metal?

      worker9270- How d you take pits out of chrome?

      We had a lot of questions about this. The short answer to this is that you can't remove pits or rust or major imperfections in chrome. Chrome is a coating and much like paint once the rust or pitting is coming up from under the coating it can't be fixed without removing the coating and treating the surface. Minor spotting can be polished out of chrome, but major defects like pits, rust, flaking, etc can not be fixed with out stripping and chroming the part again.

      alanbarclay73- Any tips for cleaning and protecting a rusty cast exhaust manifold?

      The best way to clean a rusty cast manifold is to media blast it, then apply one of our exhaust manifold paints

      swayman007- Can you use any of these to polish out scratches in glass?

      The blue "plastic" compound may help with some hazing, but scratches (especially if you can feel them with your fingernail) are tough to get out of glass. Our Pro Glass Polishing Kit for Deep Scratches will be the best bet in that situation.

      xplodee- Do you ever cheat on super soft metals by starting with emory compound rather than sanding?

      I'd be a liar if I said I haven't! The only thing you have to be careful with is that it is easy to take too much material away when using the buff motor and a heavier compound or more aggressive buff wheel than suggested for that metal. Just be VERY careful when doing that and check your progress often.

      wildfire02- Wouldn't it be better to polish really small parts in a vibratory polisher?

      A vibratory polisher or tumbler works GREAT for small parts, but admittedly it does take quite a long time to get parts mirror polished with a tumbler. If you have a big pile of small parts to polish, I'd definitely say use the tumbler, but if you just have a handful or just a couple small items, it might be quicker/easier to use a buff wheel. It really depends on the situation.

      swayman007- Can you use these wheels on a polisher sander for like polishing diamond plate?

      It could be possible, but you have to make sure that the buff wheels can safely mount to your polisher and that the polisher rotates at the correct RPM range.

      Datest41- What sort of wheel is used for step 1, 2, 3 and step 4?

      I covered that in the video, but it's also laid out in a chart in a tech article on or site here: HERE

      mimiof6- Does is matter what rpm the motor is?

      It depends on what you're buffing and the size of the wheel and motor you're using. We recommend 3600 for most metals (lower is acceptable for plated parts and softer metals) and 1800 for plastics with a 10" buff wheel.

      kennyredman- How often do you use a sisal wheel- would it have been appropriate on that rough sandcast?

      The sisal wheel is used for heavy cutting and smoothing metal. It works well for smoothing rough metal when coupled with our greaseless compounds.

      xplodee- the brass parts i polish are antique fans sitting inside?

      It depends on the conditions they are exposed to, but we guarantee at least 3 months, but probably longer if they're inside a climate controlled situation.

      wildfire02- do you have to change wheels with different compounds because of contamination or not mix?

      It's a best practice because it is difficult to get ALL of the traces of old compound off of the wheel and it could be counter-active to the polishing procedure.

      dreamboat77- don't you mean white compound? Rouge is red?

      The white compound is referred to as "White Rouge" throughout the industry. Not sure who started that or why, but there is white AND red rogue compound. Red is generally the final coloring compound and a bit more delicate than the white rouge.

      Datest41- what color is step 2?!?

      It depends on the material that you're buffing or polishing. We have a good breakdown of the steps in the tech article on our site. You can see that here: Here

      swayman007- how do you determine what size wheels to use 6", 8", or 10"?

      It depends on the buff motor that you're using. Check your motor for details on which is best. We have a chart in our buffing tech article on the site. You can see it Here.

      xplodee- What does everyone do to collect the dust from their buffer?

      One idea I didn't hit on during the live feed was that you could let a shop vac run during the buffing process to pick up the dust thrown by the wheel. It isn't as good as a air filtration system, but it is a similar concept.

      JorgeCardoso- I want to see how to work with the expander wheel, do you have any video?

      We do not currently have a video on using the expander wheel. We'll work on getting one put up ASAP!

      bamadio- You sell a 2 speed buffer motor. In what situations do you use each speed?

      The higher speed is used for metal and the lower speed is normally used for plastics and delicate metals or plated parts.

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    • Day 1 Coverage of SEMA 2011 by Eastwood

      Day One at SEMA 2011 and we are already seeing some amazing rides. We have some interviews lined up with some car builders and you will really like the stories they have to tell! For now here are a few of our highlights from todays show!

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    • We're here! Sneak peak to SEMA 2010.

      Everyone made it, and even our bags made it! Fresh off the plane, we got to meeting our friends over at V8TV to shoot a quick intro video to our SEMA blog. We then breezed through the show floor to get a sneak peak of the booths "to watch" as they were set up. I snapped off a few pictures for everyone. I can already tell there is going to be some pretty awesome stuff displayed this year!

      Enjoy the video and pictures, and let me know if you want to see anything in particular!

      -Matt/EW

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