Tag Archives: Low Rider

  • Northeast Rod and Custom Show 2012

    This year was the second annual Northeast Rod and Custom Show and after last years great turnout; we decided to stop by again and see what rides were on display this year. We were happy to see some of the familiar faces of local shop owners and car builders, but we were surprised to see some cars that had traveled very far to attend the event. This is proof that even though fuel prices are on the rise, the hot rod and custom scene is as strong as ever on the east coast!

    The show is nicely laid out in the Philly Expo Center in Oaks, PA. and took up pretty much every square inch of the building. The showing of cars was a nice mix of traditional restored classics, muscle cars, hot rods, street rods, custom classics, and even some low riders and super cars in the mix. There was something for just about everyone to drool over at this event.

    It seems the trends we noticed in the past couple SEMA shows are trickling down to the hot rod and custom scenes locally, with more flat paints showing up and larger wheels and tires setups being coupled with older vehicles. It is interesting what combinations enthusiasts are installing on their ride to make it stand out from the crowd. One of our favorites were the cars with plus-sized wire wheels with replica center caps and low profile tires. Those wheel/tire setups kept the "look" that is so classic with these older cars, while giving a fresh twist on a normally mundane wheel.

    We already are counting the days until next year, and can't wait to see what shows up next year! Check out the full coverage in photos below!

    [thethe-image-slider name="Northeast Rod and Custom 2012"]   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Eastwood Visits Source Interlink 2012- Publishers of Street Rodder, Hot Rod, Car Craft, Etc

    Every year we give a special sneak peak of our newest products to the staff of Source Interlink. Split between their offices are the talented folks that put together some of the best automotive magazines in the world. This year we had some exciting new products to show off. They eagerly watched as we unveiled them one by one. We will be launching some new Eastwood tools and chemicals that will change the way you do things! Stay tuned as we launch some of these exciting new products this summer!

    Along the way we took some pictures of the projects they have sitting in their shops. You may notice some of the well known magazine project cars. From the Car Craft twin turbo monster to the Hot Rod Magazine El Camino and the "Field Find" Buick Convertible, they all were there! Make sure you check out all of the photos, I'm sure some of these cars will look familiar!

    Stay tuned for more pictures and stories from our visit to the LA area. We met some well-known hot rod builders (that were Eastwood fans themselves!), and saw some incredible cars! Watch this space....

    [thethe-image-slider name="Source Interlink 2012"]   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • TIG Welding Custom Air Ride Struts With TIG 200

    I've gotten into the mindset where I like to try and custom build or DIY as much as possible when building a car. While more and more small niche companies are making specialized parts to "bolt-on" your project, it's easier than ever to build a "custom" vehicle. Nothing beats being able to show off your ride at a show and have people notice all of the one-off modifications and parts. In the end I spend less money, and I don't need to wait for "custom" parts to show up in the mail. It's one of my secrets to completing project cars so quickly.

    This weekend I started tackling a project that is a perfect example of this topic. Currently I'm fitting one of my project vehicles with air ride suspension. A few sites offer high-priced, "bolt-on" kits, but they still aren't a true bolt-on affair. These kits also are way out of budget for this particular build. The first big piece of the puzzle are the rear air shocks. Since this is a small vehicle, I'm tight on space and opted to go with Air Lift Chapman style air struts. These are close to the same dimensions of the original rear suspension, but they need a mount solution where they meet the rear axle beam. Niche companies do sell accessories that allow you to bolt the struts on with out breaking out the welder. But the cost to buy them, and wait for them to be made, and arrive to me; I could've saved time and $150-$200.

    I decided to take a pair of worn out, original rear shocks and cut the bottoms off with the end links and use my Eastwood TIG 200 to mate them together. Luckily the Air Lift rear air struts came beveled at the bottoms to make a nice valley to lay the filler rod in. I also ground a small bevel on the original shock bottoms.

    I then set my TIG 200 up on a 110V outlet and set the output at the pedal to be a max of 120 Amps. I decided to use an .030 filler rod to produce a small, tight puddle that wouldn't protrude from the joint too much. I found myself hovering the pedal around 75% which was about 100-110 Amps. The results were pretty good given that I am definitely still a beginner to TIG welding.

    In the end I spent about an hour total modifying these air struts, and saved myself a significant amount of money and wait time. If you do this a few times even on one project, you can see how you've quickly paid for your welder, and have the satisfaction of having parts you made yourself!

      Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Northeast Rod and Custom Show A Success

    This past weekend here in Eastwood country there was the sound of exhaust, the smell of oil and gas, as well as the shine of beautiful paint jobs as hundreds of Hot Rods, Customs, and Classics entered the Greater Philadelphia Convention Center. I took the trip down and managed to snap off some pictures to share.

    The show was one of the most diverse shows I've been to recently (aside from SEMA 2010). Even though the styles and types of vehicles varied greatly, everything seemed right at home together. The locals represented heavily, but it wasn't unusual to see license plates from all over. I know this is one show I will be looking forward to next year! Enjoy the pictures!

      Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Welcome back Impala, you have been gone so long!

    Everyone loves a good project right? But at times there is a point where some are "too far gone". Well with the technology of restoration tools/products and the wealth of information found on the Internet these days; one can rebuild most any car with the right patience and skills. In comes this 1961 Impala Convertible project that we have stumbled across on www.Impalas.net .

    According to the current owner this car spent 20+ years in a ditch before it came into his caring ownership. This car has appeared to have been quite plagued with rust and rot. Also, it  has been in a collision at some point to make things worse.  Along the way he picked up countless donor cars, including a 62 Buick convertible and two 4 door 61 Bel Air donor cars, etc. With the use of those donor cars, some pretty amazing work is being done to save a car that most would have parted out on site. Some of the interesting metal work being done includes converting the one spare Bel Air trunk to an Impala trunk, replacing the rear quarters, windshield frame, cowls, front clip, window channels, dash, and so on and so forth. Basically there isn't going to be a piece of this car that hasn't been gone over (and possibly replaced!) completely along the way. This is no simple job, and takes some dedication! So hats goes off to a dedicated enthusiast, we can't wait to see how it turns out in the end! Please see the complete thread with very informative, detailed pics of the build here: http://www.impalas.net/forums/showthread.php?t=686 .

      Click Here To Read Full Post...