Tag Archives: mercury

  • Hollywood Hot Rods- How To Chop a Mercury with help from Eastwood

    Chopping a Mercury with help from Eastwood
    By Jim Aust/Hollywood Hot Rods

    Every since the first sleek new 1949 Mercury hit the street crafty restylers have lusted after examples with the roof a bit lower than the factory offerings. Sam Barris was among the first to chop his own personal Mercury, and the process would be repeated thousands of times over the next seven decades. Just as the title “custom” means, personally designed customs each have a unique style and equally unique method of creation.

    The guys at Hollywood Hot Rods have built a series of much loved custom vehicles so it’s only natural that they would have chopped a few Mercury’s along the way. Refining the process to a science, Hollywood Hot Rods get the job done lowering a lid on a Mercury (or any vehicle) with the help of various tools from The Eastwood Company. For this demonstration an Eastwood Shrinker/Stretcher is used to a few of the vital steps in the process completed. Follow along as Hollywood Hot Rods shows how they lowered a roof on this 1951 Mercury.

    Chopping the top on a Mercury is so popular at Hollywood Hot Rods that they have to wait in line for their turn under the knife.

    The easy part is removing the top, the tough part is putting it back on correctly.

    After lowering the roof the desired amount, the corners of the windows now require reworking to close up the gaps created in the process.

    This view shows the great deal of work that will be necessary to reshape the rear corners of the quarter windows.

    The first step is to trim out the rear corners so that new corners can be fitted in place.

    To fill the corners small strips of sheet metal are cut and folded 90-degees in a sheet metal brake.

    Next up the Eastwood Shrinker/Stretcher is used to shrink one edge of the custom new pieces to replicate the look of the factory corners in the newly required radiuses.

    The newly fabricated pieces are carefully fit into in the trimmed out window corners.

    The new window corners are tacked in place and checked again for proper placement before final welding is completed.

    Once the final welding is finished the corners are shaped with a die grinder equipped with a barrel drum sanding head.

    On this particular chop the decision was made to round-off the upper rear door corners rather than retain the square factory style corners.

    -

    Rather than cut the original door corners into multiple pieces, Hollywood Hot Rods prefers to create new sweeping corner from fresh sheet metal.

    Repeating the earlier process, new inner door corners are made with the Eastwood Shrinker/Stretcher. Once the new door corners are in place they are welded and smoothed the same way as the window corners.

    Just a few steps transformed this Mercury from a stocker to show stopper! Hit the Hollywood Hot Rods Website to see more of their work, enlist their services, or buy some sweet HHR gear!

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  • Hot Rod Homecoming 65th Anniversary Show Coverage- Part 1

    It's no secret that the west coast, specifically southern California or "SoCal" has been the hotbed for Hot Rodding. Many of the legendary customizers, race drivers, companies, and magazines called SoCal their home. By far the biggest magazine in the world of hot rodding is the one and only Hot Rod Magazine. They've been around since day one, and even through all of the ups and downs of the automotive world, they're still around, and as strong as ever. This year marked the 65th anniversary since their inception. In celebration, the crew at Hot Rod Magazine invited the entire hot rodding community to come join them at the Pomona Fairgrounds for a "Homecoming". We were already planning a trip to visit them and some of their sister magazines that week, so we stayed the weekend to catch the show and set up a small booth with our friends at Hollywood Hot Rods.

    This wasn't going to be just any car show, the Hot Rod crew dug deep into their little black book and were able to dig out some REALLY important cover and feature cars from the past 65 years. Everyone in attendance were amazed at what crawled out of the woodwork, and we're not just talking cars! Anyone with a keen eye could spot some legends of hot rodding walking there amongst us mortals.

    Saturday we spent the day breezing through the show and taking pictures of some of the cars that immediately caught our eye. We were so overwhelmed that sunday felt like an entirely different show once we dug in and took in all of the cars in attendance. The show also had some really nice "non-feature" cars that were just hitting the public for the first time. We gotta say that the quality of cars in the show were top notch by any standards. You really had to search every corner of the fairplex show grounds to see some of these cars. Check out our gallery below to see some of our favorites from Saturday. We're still digging through pictures and hopefully this week we can have the next batch up!

    Thanks to all that welcomed us East-Coasters into SoCal, showed us around, chatted with us, or stopped by our booth. We hope we can do it again!

    -Matt/EW

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  • Car people are good people... but you already knew that- Saving John's 1947 Mercury

    John

    Here at Eastwood, we hear stories like this every once in a while. But a new heartwarming story recently came to light out of Happy Valley, Oregon that we thought we'd share with you. It's just a great human interest story that happens to revolve around classic car restoration.

    The story is about 75-year-old John Bowdon, who bought a rusty 1947 Mercury a long, long time ago. He tinkered with the car for 33 years, but the Merc never became the dream ride Bowdon had in mind. "Life got in the way, and he never finished it," said Rick Rogers, who was a 15-year-old with a passion for cars when he met Bowdon in the mid-'70s.

    Now there is another obstacle. Bowdon has cancer, and his days are numbered.

    When they heard the news, Rogers and other members of the Rose City Street Rod Association — a car club Bowdon co-founded in the early 1970s — shifted into gear.

    They would get the job done.

    For the rest of the story, please click here. It'll just confirm what we at Eastwood have always known: there's something special and deep about the camaraderie and friendship that "car people" nurture among themselves.

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  • The Debris-Capri Project, Knee Deep in Rust!

    Product Managers J.R. and Mark R. have been busy on their lunch breaks here at Eastwood! They are now deep into rust repair on J.R.'s Capri project. Because of how rare these cars are, they have been forced to use a mix of Mustang and custom made replacement panels for the project. Check out the latest progress in the slide show for all of the good, bad and rusty!

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  • J.R.'s Dream Car Gets some Love

    Some of you may have caught the short promo video we did for our Vegas Dream Ride Tour. It showcased J.R.'s recently acquired Mercury Capri project car. Well, this week he finally started digging into the car in the first of many restoration projects on the car. Check out the video below, as well as the rust he is dealing with initially repairing! More pics to come as we dig in!

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