Tag Archives: Metal Working

  • Eastwood Visits Hollywood Hot Rods and 2012 Street Rodder Road Tour Car

    You may remember that we announced about a month ago that we would be the Official Tool Sponsor of the 2012 Street Rodder Road Tour Car. This meant that the crew at Hollywood Hot Rods would be using our line of tools, from brake line tools to metal fabrication tools, they used it all! We recently had the opportunity to stop in and visit with Troy Ladd and his crew. We got the full tour and checked out the progress on the 40 Ford they were putting together for the 2012 Road Tour.

    Hollywood Hot Rods has been based in the Burbank area for a while now. Their location is in a part of town where you might not expect to see a hot rod or fabrication shop situated, but that's the beauty of Southern California. They make the most of their space and really pack it full of project cars! Just like their builds, everything had its well thought out place with each car being nestled into its own little piece of hot rod heaven. Everywhere you turned seemed to have a corner filled with more killer projects and tools, it was definitely overload of the senses for a custom car enthusiast!

    Finally we were able to check out the current status of the 40 Ford being built for the 2012 Street Rodder Road Tour. We had seen some spy photos of the chop being done to the roof of the car, but it was something else to see the finished product in person. With the help of some key Eastwood metal working tools like our Pro Hammer and Dolly Kit, Shrinker Stretchers, Bullseye Picks, Adjustable Profile Gauges, and many more they had the Drake body looking like it came from them with the chop. They really have chops down to a science and it showed with how flawless the metal work was!

    All in all it was a great trip and Troy and his crew were very gracious hosts, heck even the shop dog gave us a warm welcome and goodbye! We can't wait to see how the 40 Ford progresses and what other tricks Hollywood Hotrods and Street Rodder Magazine have in store for the car. Make sure you keep watching the blog for more updates on the 2nd annual Eastwood Summer Classic where you can see this very car in person!

    Check out the slideshow below for some of the highlights from our visit with Hollywood Hotrods!

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  • Eastwood Visits Source Interlink 2012- Publishers of Street Rodder, Hot Rod, Car Craft, Etc

    Every year we give a special sneak peak of our newest products to the staff of Source Interlink. Split between their offices are the talented folks that put together some of the best automotive magazines in the world. This year we had some exciting new products to show off. They eagerly watched as we unveiled them one by one. We will be launching some new Eastwood tools and chemicals that will change the way you do things! Stay tuned as we launch some of these exciting new products this summer!

    Along the way we took some pictures of the projects they have sitting in their shops. You may notice some of the well known magazine project cars. From the Car Craft twin turbo monster to the Hot Rod Magazine El Camino and the "Field Find" Buick Convertible, they all were there! Make sure you check out all of the photos, I'm sure some of these cars will look familiar!

    Stay tuned for more pictures and stories from our visit to the LA area. We met some well-known hot rod builders (that were Eastwood fans themselves!), and saw some incredible cars! Watch this space....

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  • Eastwood Metal Working Tip- Forming Metal with Items You Have Around the House

    Metal working is definitely an art that takes a lot of practice to master. In the grand scheme of things I am definitely wet behind the ears when it comes to metal working. It seems each time I tackle a new project, I learn a little more. A common misconception when someone thinks about metal working is that you need a huge shop full of industrial sized machines to successfully shape and form metal. It's easy to see why people come to this conclusion; watch just about any Hot Rod, Chopper, or custom car TV show, and you see them using all of these giant industrial sized machines that cost a fortune. Those tools are great,and amazing to use if you have access to them. But you can build a lot in a home shop with an arsenal of a few essential tools. Some of these you can even make yourself!

    Bending radiuses in metal is one of the more difficult tasks you may come across when honing your metal working skills. This is something that was often a mystery to me, and a task I thought required an english wheel. Once I started doing some poking around on a few popular metal working forums, I noticed that many of the seasoned veterans were using homemade tools to form curves and even recreate original embossed shapes in panels. They are using everything from logs and tree trunks to metal pipes and pieces of scrap metal to build some pretty beautiful things.

    This got me thinking, with a few simple Eastwood tools, and a couple of items you could find laying around your home, you could really build some neat stuff! I decided to show how we recreated the curve in the driver's door of Project Pile House using a stainless pipe, a vice, and a couple of our Metal Forming Mallets.

    The picture below shows the condition of the door when we started. Not only was it rotted out, it also had a bad dent repair done many years ago. Because of this we decided to replace the door skin just above the damage.

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    Once we cut off the outer door skin I took the picture below to show the slight radius the panel had to it originally. This is what we wanted to recreate.

    After putting a flange on the new door skin, we cut a slit in the top of the flange to allow us to form the radius in the panel we need to recreate. We grabbed a piece of stainless pipe we had that is about 3", and clamped it in the vice. We then took out our Metal Forming Mallet Set and began slowly beating the edge of the panel over the pipe to get a radius started.

    After some hammering and test fitting, we finally got the radius very close. We then used the backing strips in our Panel Install Kit to to get the new skin attached.

    Once that piece was tack welded into place, we test fit and continue welding like we've already shown you in previous tech entries (you're on the home stretch!).

    Once you get over the idea that you always need to use special tools to form metal, you will find yourself looking at things differently when working in the garage. I know I've got the word out to some neighbors about getting one of those big old stumps they have laying around. I plan on making it into a metal working "station"! Give us a shout if you have a cool idea for a metal working tool, we'd love to hear your ideas!

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  • Lower Door Skin Restoration

    We are currently working on restoring the lower inner and outer door skins on Pile House. Man; these things were bad! We will be doing a full video tech feature on it here shortly. We also will be featuring the process on our February catalog cover! Stay tuned! Here are a few pics to hold everyone over for now.

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  • Welcome back Impala, you have been gone so long!

    Everyone loves a good project right? But at times there is a point where some are "too far gone". Well with the technology of restoration tools/products and the wealth of information found on the Internet these days; one can rebuild most any car with the right patience and skills. In comes this 1961 Impala Convertible project that we have stumbled across on www.Impalas.net .

    According to the current owner this car spent 20+ years in a ditch before it came into his caring ownership. This car has appeared to have been quite plagued with rust and rot. Also, it  has been in a collision at some point to make things worse.  Along the way he picked up countless donor cars, including a 62 Buick convertible and two 4 door 61 Bel Air donor cars, etc. With the use of those donor cars, some pretty amazing work is being done to save a car that most would have parted out on site. Some of the interesting metal work being done includes converting the one spare Bel Air trunk to an Impala trunk, replacing the rear quarters, windshield frame, cowls, front clip, window channels, dash, and so on and so forth. Basically there isn't going to be a piece of this car that hasn't been gone over (and possibly replaced!) completely along the way. This is no simple job, and takes some dedication! So hats goes off to a dedicated enthusiast, we can't wait to see how it turns out in the end! Please see the complete thread with very informative, detailed pics of the build here: http://www.impalas.net/forums/showthread.php?t=686 .

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