Tag Archives: MIG 135

  • How to repair rust- Fixing a rusty windshield cowl

    So you decided to give your car a refreshing new look and it's time to strip it down to prepare the car for paint. You can count on finding some sort of surprise when tearing the vehicle down. Whether it's hidden accident damage, previous repairs, or the mummy of a dead animal; it's always an adventure when stripping a car or truck down for paint or bodywork.

    I recently started tearing into my "clean" (for the east coast at least!) 1977 VW Scirocco I've owned for a few years. It had some wear and tear and some bubbling paint I wanted to address before it got a fresh lick of paint. When I began removing the fenders I was pretty surprised to find some rot in the inner fender and windshield cowl. I decided to take some photos as I repaired this area and share some tips for making a repair that will look original when done.

    Here is the offending area when I removed the fender. The worst rot was in an area that sandwiched between the fender and cowl and was covered with weather stripping. So from first glance it just looked like some bubbled paint, but that was the tip of the iceberg.

    I first cut out the area that was rotted until I got to solid metal and a nice seam where I could weld and blend the panel into the original metal.

    I started making my patch panel by bending up a piece of construction paper to the rough size I needed, then I transferred the rough shape over and cut it out of 20 gauge aluminized steel. Next I measured the other side and marked out the bend line I needed to make.

    In order to make a clean bend in the new metal I needed a metal brake. I decided to use the Versa Bend Sheet Metal Brake and put a crisp 90 degree bend in the panel on my line.

    With the patch panel now formed into the rough size I needed, I took it to the car and trimmed it to fit the opening. It's here that you want to make sure the patch panel fits tightly so that you don't need any excessive welding to fill voids.

    I then setup the MIG 135 with .023 Solid Core MIG Wire so I could lay small, flat spot welds on the patch panel. Setting the machine up on a similar piece of scrap metal helped me get my spot welds laying flat and penetrating correctly. After finessing the panel with Eastwood Hammers and Dollies and blending the welds with a flap disc on an angle grinder I was satisfied with the repair. I'm happy to say the patch panel looks close to original and the repair should be invisible once it has primer and a top coat on it. Now onto the next surprise!

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  • Share your welding life with your welding wife!

    Introducing our new line of "Lady Eastwood" MIG Welders! Just kidding, but...

    It might be a little difficult to think of your wife underneath a welder's helmet, but more and more women continue to get into the field. In Australia, for example, the Queensland government launched a new "women-only" program in July that would help alleviate a shortage of skilled welders in the province.

    The pilot program of "Women Who Weld" has already started with its first class of women welders, ranging in age from late-teens to mid-30s. At the end of the course this fall, they will each receive a Statement of Achievement, and will have progressed towards the completion of three units of competency from the Certificate I in Engineering qualification.

    Of course, in the United States, women have been in the welding workforce for decades, at least as far back as World War II. As of a few years ago, women made up 6%-7% of welders, and it's been pretty steady since. Many in the industry believe there's no reason women shouldn't be in the profession, especially since they possess the characteristics of a good welder: stable hands and scrupulous eyes.

    When you think about it, this is a great way to get your wife, girlfriend or daughter to participate in your favorite hobby! The family that welds together, stays together!

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  • Rear Air Ride Suspension Fabrication- Project Pile House

    Recently I began to tackle suspension on the truck. Even though I'm using a vehicle that is pretty common to install air bags on, it still requires some extra thought to make everything work correctly when there is a classic truck body on top of the S10 chassis. I couldn't mount the bags or any brackets for them higher than the frame work in the bed that I already built, so I decided to buy some universal bag mounts and use some bar stock to make my own bag-on-bar air ride kit in the rear end of the truck.

    I started by test fitting the bags and brackets and setting them at a height that I utilized the full travel of the bags. Once I set the height of the brackets on top of the rear, I tack welded them in place and began work on the cross member bar that the bags will lift on. I mounted the bar snugly between the frame rails giving some additional lateral strength to the chassis, while also giving a firm location for the bags to lift on. This also allowed me to set the bar just below the level of the bed floor. Once I test fit everything together, I welded it all using the Eastwood MIG 175. This is where the extra power of the 175 was needed over the MIG 135 that I like to use on lighter fabrication and sheet metal jobs.

    After everything was welded in place I put a quick test line together with a schrader valve to test the movement of the truck by just adding air from the shop compresser to fill the bags. I will be deciding on an air ride management system later on in the build once some other parts of the project are completed first.

    Next up we will be refreshing the front suspension with our fancy new performance suspension parts from ProForged. They make some great severe-duty suspension parts that will handle most anything you could throw at them. At the same time we'll be installing the front air ride parts and be gearing up to build some new running boards from scratch to replace the rusty old ones. Lots of cool custom work to come, so check back often!

    -Matt/EW

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  • Bed Stretching Made Easy- Using Eastwood Metal Brake and Slip Roll

    One of the big (and controversial) jobs that we have been planning on the truck is the stretch of the bed to match the dimensions of the other half of the truck. During this process we developed and tested 2 new products. With the help of a new metal brake and slip roll, the job of recreating the original embossing in the bedsides couldn't have been easier. We shot a ton of photos and video along the way to show the process and hope to get some of it out there for you to view here soon!

    For now here is a shot of how the truck sits with the stretch. There is still a lot to do to the bed to bring it back into service, but this was a huge step in the project! Stay tuned as we dig in further!

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  • How to Replace A Rusty Lower Door Skin

    When looking over Project Pile House we started seeing a lot of spots where we needed to repair rusted panels on the body. When sizing it all up, we found that many of them could be replaced with the combination of some basic hand tools and our new Patch Panel Install Kit. We decided to show you an outline of how to tackle this job on an extremely rusty door. Enjoy the video, and let us know if you have any ideas for future technical how-to videos!

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