Tag Archives: MIG 175

  • MIG Welding Duty Cycles

    When you are using an arc welding machine, you will need to understand what its duty cycle is as it will help you preserve the life and quality of your tool. On this page, you will learn about what a duty cycle is and how it is relevant to MIG welders, specifically.

    The MIG Welding Duty Cycle

    When you purchase a MIG welder, you will notice a specification on the packaging or in the manual called the duty cycle. This refers to the amount of welding that can be achieved in a given amount of time. The reason this specification is important is it informs the user of how long the MIG welder can work at its optimum level, since MIG welders, or any other welders, do not perform continuously as opposed to some other automotive tools that do.

    A perfect example of a duty cycle can be found in the Eastwood MIG 175 Amp Welder. The MIG 175 has a rated duty cycle of 30% at 130 amps. This means that the power signal of the MIG 175 should remain on for 30% of the time and off 70% of the time at 130 amps of power. If you look at your welding time in increments of 10 minutes, the duty cycle is a percentage of that 10 minute increment. In other words, with a 30% duty cycle at 130 amps, you can weld for three solid minutes and should let the welder cool off for seven minutes. You can increase the duty cycle percentage by turning down the amperage output, but going above the amp output (in this case, 130 amps) will yield a lower duty cycle. If you exceed the duty cycle and the breaker is tripped, allow the MIG welder to cool down for at least 15 minutes. A rated duty cycle on any MIG welding machine is there to protect you and your welder from any long-lasting damage.

    To learn more about MIG welding and for more automotive articles, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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  • How to Repair Rust With a TIG Welder- Rusty Door Skin Repair

    There's a handful of ways you can tackle repairing rust in your vehicle and all of them have their place. The most common would probably be cutting out the metal and MIG welding a patch panel in place. While this method is the easiest to accomplish, it can be difficult to blend the weld seam into the surrounding metal. I've done repairs this way for many years and they've turned out ok, but I've always wanted to master TIG welding patch panels and metal finishing the area for a seamless repair. I've recently begun switching a lot of my welding projects ....  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Learn from a legend- Gene Winfield Custom Metal Working Class

    I decided to make a trip to Harmony, PA (about 35 minutes outside Pittsburgh, PA) to Hahn-Vorbach & Associates Collector Car Restoration to visit Gene and become a student of "Windy Winfield". The metal shaping classes are always small in size and very intimate. This isn't a class where you'll be sitting in a chair listening to a lecture and just taking notes, Gene gets EVERYONE involved and is happy to take on any and all questions. The classes are commonly two day events starting promptly at 9AM and lasting until whenever everyone is exhausted. If you want to attend these classes, be sure to get plenty of sleep ahead of time because it's high paced with little to no breaks.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Custom Hood Modifications- Converting a Multi-Piece Hood to One Piece

    One thing that I’ve planned to customize on Project Pile House from day one was the hood. The hood on the truck is a “butterfly” (as I call it) style hood and was a design that Dodge rolled over from 30’s and 40’s trucks. I have taken a 50’s custom type approach to this truck and that style hood wasn’t going to flow. I decided to disassemble the hood and convert it to a one-piece hood.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Early Summer Project Pile House Update.

    With the floor pans made up I decided to move outwards and tackle the rust in the door openings. The truck door sill on the drivers side was rotted away and the front of the door opening/jamb was rotted pretty bad. In fact the lower portion was almost non existent.  Click Here To Read Full Post...