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Tag Archives: paint

  • How to Repair Clearcoat Defects

    Since the 1980s the automotive manufacturers have been painting cars with two stage, base coat/clear coat systems. That may not seem all that long ago to some of us older guys, but these cars are now 30 years old and entering prime project car territory. Because drivetrain technology had hit its stride by then, cars like 5.0 Mustangs are still running and driving just fine. But many cars from the 80s and 90s have clear coat paint that is just peeling and flaking off in chunks. Some cars, like the Plymouth Neon, seemed to have paint and clear coat failing before they were even off lease.
  • Mixing Urethane Paint- Color and Clear Coat

    Our tech hotline answers lots of calls every day about everything we sell, and how best to use it. A lot of questions are about welding and technique, and a lot of questions concern paint and applying it. We are happy to answer those, and any other automotive related topics. If we don’t have an expert on the line immediately, we’ll be sure to find out the answer from one and get back to you. Recently a customer called with a question about mixing single stage urethane paints with a urethane clear. Single stage paint already has plenty of gloss and is UV stabilized to be used as a top coat by itself. So, you may ask why mix a single stage color coat with a clear top coat? When people do this it is typically because they have been painting since the lacquer days, or the person who taught them was from that era.
  • How to get Perfect Body Panels with Block Sanding

    Ever wonder what it is that separates the mirror smooth bodies of show cars from the body filler fender bender repair you did in your driveway? Often times it all comes down to the important step between the first coat of primer and the first coat of paint, called blocking. Without proper blocking, no matter how good the painter is you are never going to get a perfect show car finish on your project.
  • Candy Coat Paint FAQ

    What exactly is candy paint? Candy paint, or sometimes Kandy paint, is a clear paint with translucent pigments in it. It is typically applied over a metallic base coat and allows the metal flakes to be seen through the tinted candy color layer. One of the trickiest things about candy colors is that the thicker the paint is put on the darker the color will get, so if you are all inconsistent with the application the color can appear streaked, or spotted.

    How much candy paint do I need for one car? Typically 1 gallon of candy paint and 1 gallon of metallic base coat are enough for the average size car. If you are painting the engine compartment, trunk and door jambs you may need to order more paint. A coat of non-candy tinted clear should be applied as well.

    What's the difference between candy paint and regular paints? Regular paints for the most part are opaque, meaning you can’t see through them, whereas candy paints are translucent. Regular paints get their color with solids in a solvent base. Candy colors have a clear base with just a little colored tint in it; they allow the base coat color or metalflake they are applied over to still be seen.

    What's the best ratio for mixing Candy paint colors? Eastwood Candeez should be mixed 4 part Candeez paint to 1 part 21854Z activator.

    How long does it take Candy paints to dry? Eastwood Candeez can be recoated after a 15-20 minute flash dry. If more than 18 hours have passed, paint should be sanded with 800 grit to promote adhesion before applying another coat, or the final clear is sprayed.

    What are some good custom color ideas when using Candy paint? Candy paints open the doors to all sorts of advanced custom finishes: Ghost flames, Chameleon color changing finishes, Fades, etc. Even if you aren’t looking to get tricky, candy red, green, or blue over a metallic silver base will give you the kind of mile deep look that is the difference between a street car and a show car.

    How much does it cost to Candy paint a car? Candy paint jobs are more expensive because they are more difficult to do. There are typically more coats of paint to be sprayed, and more products to buy. Candy paint cannot be applied in a single stage. There is always at least a base coat over the primer, then the candy and a clear coat over that. Typical costs are about $400 for base and candy paint and activators, plus $100-150 for your clear coat and activator, if you are doing it yourself. To have a professional do it you can pay from $2500 up to $10,000 depending on how complicated the paint job is.

    What's the best spray gun to use when applying Candy paint? To apply Eastwood Candeez use a HVLP gun with a 1.2-1.4mm tip, or a conventional gun with a 1.4-1.6mm tip. More important that what gun you use however is having it set up correctly to get a consistent spay pattern. Then it all comes down to keeping an even distance and speed as you spray so as not to end up with streaks or spots where the tint is darker.

    How many coats of Candy paint provide the best results? Once you have the base coat apply at least 5 thin coats of candy color, more if you want a darker, less translucent look. Then apply a final clear coat over that.

    Which primer should I use for Candy paints? With Eastwood Candeez the preferred primer is the 2k Urethane for best intercoat adhesion. The base coat goes between the candy and the primer so color is not much of a concern.

    What's the best way to clean and maintain candy paint? Candy paint in the past has not been stable if left under the UV rays of the sun for too long. Modern clear coats are much more UV resistant, but candy tints can still fade with time and UV exposure more than other non-candy paints. If you want the special color and look of it to last a long time, it is still best to park it indoors, or cover the car when it is in the sun. No other special steps need to be taken though, you can wash and wax it the same as you would any other modern base coat/clear coat paint job.

  • Powder Coating FAQ

    Powder coating is a dry painting process that uses a fine powder with the consistency of powdered sugar, and an electrical charge to coat an object. Then the piece is baked in an oven at 400+ degrees Fahrenheit to make the powder melt and flow together. Once it is cooled and cured the powder coat has formed a solid plastic coating over the entire surface that is much more durable than regular paint.

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