Tag Archives: pilot

  • Straightening the Heavily Dented Roof- Eastwood MIG Stud Weld Kit

    Pilehouse didn't live a charmed life, it was used and abused as a farm truck, then sat for many years in the woods. Mother Nature has really left her mark on the truck. From the scratches and scrapes, to HUGE dents and smashed in sections, some would say I'm a masochist for taking on such a project. I've always liked a challenge and I thought straightening the roof would be just that.

    Some of the dents on the roof were fixed by metal bumping them back into shape with the Eastwood Pro Hammer and Dolly Kit, but other areas weren't so easy. I found a few pesky dents that were in areas I couldn't get to, or were simply creased and needed some pulling before I worked them with the hammer and dolly. We recently released a new MIG Stud Welding Kit that was perfect for the job. This kit allows you to turn your MIG welder into a stud welder. I've always hated using a traditional stud welder. It's bulky, heavy, and hard to get a solid weld with. It's pretty simple, just add the MIG Stud nozzle to the end of the MIG gun and slide a stud into the nozzle. Then just hit the trigger for a couple seconds and I've got a firmly attached stud for pulling dents.

    Below is the damage I was repairing. It looks like a sharp edge scraped against the roof and really did a number on this spot. After Stripping the paint and surface rust, I had bare metal to weld my studs to.

    I began welding studs into the deepest portion of the crease and using the slide hammer to pull the dent out. I like to leave the studs in place until I've got the dent roughly pulled out. This way I can come back and give a couple more pulls on the slide hammer if an area didn't quite pop out like I wanted.

    After I got the dent roughed out, I cut off the studs and used a flap disc to take the stud welds back down to the surface. I then like to check the area with the palm of my hand for low spots I missed. This crease came out after only a handful of pulls and you can see below it's MUCH better. It only took a little more hammer and dolly work to have it ready for a skim coat of filler, then primer. If you have the patience you could eventually metal finish this area perfect and only use primer. This whole project took 30 minutes, so I'd say repairing this crease was a relatively easy job (I wish all repairs were this easy!).

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  • Chopping the top on a 1950 Dodge Pick-up – Eastwood’s Project Pile House- Part 1

    One of the next big projects planned for Project Pile House is performing a mild chop and smooth job on the cab and roof. We started the process in a previous post where we showed you How to Shave and Smooth Unneeded Holes in the bed and cab. Today we decided to really dig into this next part of the project.

    Since the roof will need to be worked and modified in a number of spots, I decided to use our 7 Inch Cleaning and Stripping Disc Kit on an Electric Angle Grinder to quickly strip the top half of the cab and doors down to bare metal. This will allow us to easily mark, cut, and weld the roof as we get it situated in it's new, lower position.

    Next I decided to remove the drip rails. This modification isn't a new one in the Hot Rod, Street Rod and custom world, but it's definitely one that's always debated. The original drip rails were in pretty sad shape, and I prefer smooth customs; so I decided to remove them with the angle grinder. I'll come back with a Flap Disc and bring the rough-cut edge flush with the roof. The drip rail is composed of 2 pieces of metal pinched and folded over, so I will have to weld the two pieces together and blend them before the truck is "done", but we'll wait until the chopped roof is back in place to finish that portion of the job.

    While we were on a roll, Mark R. (of Eastwood R&D Corner fame) helped me measure out the lines for where the chop would take place. After a little head scratching, and test fitting me (the driver) in the truck, we decided on a 3" chop that would take place below the rear windows and bring the lower "reveal" or contour of the rear window openings down to match the height of the lower door window sill. This would also bring the roof seam down to match with the top of the door, and make the size of the side door glass close to the that of the rear and cab-corner windows (I really like symmetry in custom cars!). With the lines laid out with painters tape, I'll be gearing up to make the cuts in the next week or two. Stay tuned, we'll be filming and posting a DIY video showing how we chop the roof. We're excited to see how Pile House looks with a fresh chop and shave!

    -Matt/EW

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