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Tag Archives: plastic repair

  • Cracked Grill Repair - Eastwood Hot Stapler

    Many late model cars are made with plastic grills, bumpers, and interior trim.  I'm not saying there is anything wrong with this but the one area they lack is in their strength, even the slighest fender bender can cause them to crack or break off.  Not to mention that as plastic ages it can become weaker.  If you've ever tried, super glue will never hold the pieces together so repairing with that is out of the question.  Eastwood has a permanent way to repair your plastic interior and exterior parts and save you from having to buy new.  The Eastwood Hot Stapler allows you to re-attach the broken pieces by bridging the crack with a metal staple.  It doesn't just hold the two pieces together it fuses into the plastic by melting into both sides.

     

    Photo Oct 14, 2 28 08 PM

    The grill of this 2000 Silverado was damaged when a piece of mud was thrown off of another cars tire.  A new chrome grill for this truck costs around $100, this might not seem like much but depending on your car it may not be easy to locate replacement parts.

     

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    After removing the clips that hold the grill to the radiator support, I was able to take the grill off and bring it into the shop.  The damage was actually a little worse than I had originally thought because the lower black plastic was completely gone.

     

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    I removed the plastic tabs holding the two pieces of the grill together to reveal that the cracks along the inside were even worse yet.

     

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    In order to make a hidden repair I decided to continue to separate the two grill halves until I had enough room to get the stapler in and repair the front half.  I used a welding magnet wedged in between them to keep the two separated so I had an extra hand to work.

     

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    Using two needle nose locking pliers I was able to hold the two pieces together so they wouldn't move out of place, once I put the first staple in the position of the two pieces it is set in shape.

     

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    I placed three of the wide staples along the flat edge, these will provide the main support.  I've found that once you press the staple into the plastic, push it to the side to completely submerge the metal under the plastic.  Doing this will prevent the staple from pulling straight out of the plastic.

     

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    I removed the two clamps and put two of the narrower staples on each of the edges, placing them here will help prevent any twisting that might occur while driving down the road.

     

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    To remove the staple tails use a pair of heavy duty flush cutters.  Do not use wire cutters, the hardness of the staple will gouge the cutting surface.

     

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    While the two pieces were still separated I had to deal with the rest of the cracked plastic.  Since the majority of the black plastic will not be seen from the outside I was able to put staples on both sides of the cracks for extra support.

     

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    To reconnect the crack that was in the corner, the kit comes with a special staple that is angled to fit directly into a corner.  These are great because corners like this are very prone to cracking and these staples are a very straight forward solution.

     

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    Along the back side I followed the same procedure using both the wide and narrow depending on where each of the cracks were.

     

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    From the factory both pieces of the grill were melted together at each of these tabs.  While disassembling the grill I was forced to cut away the melted plastic to separate them.  To rejoin the two I was able to use one of the narrow staples to melt them back together.

     

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    The grill is now one solid piece again but Its not quite finished yet.  The crack along the plated piece caused the coating to peal off.  Look out for a future article where it will be sanded filled and repainted.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

  • Eastwood Sneak Peak- Make Permanent Plastic Repairs with Ease!

    We are so excited to debut this new product early June that we decided to give you a sneak peak! This tool will change the way you look at repairing damaged plastic, polyurethane and similar parts forever. Also, this tool will be a game changer for anyone looking to build custom plastic interior and exterior parts. No longer will you need to depend on an epoxy that could fail and break just handling the part. Watch your inboxes for the new catalog early June featuring this product and the launch on the site around the same time!

    -Matt/EW

  • Project Debris Capri Interior Update- Making Old Interior Parts Look New!

    It's been a while since we've updated everyone on J.R.'s Project "Debris" Capri project, but he's been busy! Most recently he updated the look of the worn out original interior. This isn't a vehicle you can grab a catalog and order repopped interior parts for, so he had to get creative.

    After looking around at many modern day sports cars, he decided he wanted to try and replicate the black and tan two-tone color scheme newer Porsches were using. This was not going to be an easy task!

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    He decided to use a mix of autobody and interior products from Eastwood along the way. First he tackled the dash bezel by removing the original woodgrain decal and respraying the bezel with Eastwood Wrinkle Black Paint. For the final detail he used an Eastwood prototype Silver Metallic Interior Paint on the gauge surrounds. The transformation of just this part alone was great!

    Next J.R. moved on to restoring the original weathered door cards. These days they had a permanent green tint on the vinyl that was a bit scary. After cleaning the panels with PRE Painting Prep, he applied a light coat of SEM Adhesion Promoter, followed by a few light coats of SEM Camel Interior Paint and SEM Landau Black Interior Paint. With the door panels looking fresh again, you could see the color scheme for the interior was coming together nicely.

    The last important part of this interior restoration project was the weathered dashboard. Like many cars this age, the dashboard was cracked quite badly. First he applied expanding foam to fill and replace the foam that had deteriorated. Once he had the cracks filled and the surface level, he used the new Eastwood Contour Body Filler to smooth out the top of the dash and blend in the repair areas. He finished up the job by respraying the dash with the same colors he used on the other interior parts.

    Now that the parts have all come together. You can really see how he transformed and updated the look of the interior in the Capri from a tacky 70's era color scheme, to a timeless two-tone look. J.R. has a few more bits to finish up, then drop a carpet in it, and he should be ready to cruise in style this summer. Stay tuned for more updates!

     

     

     

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