Tag Archives: racing

  • West Coast Report 41st Edition by John Gilbert

    West Coast Report 41st Edition by John Gilbert

    Shake Rattle & Run — Gearhead Kid Builds Auto Restoration Empire

    WCE-41-01

    Torn from the pages of Street Rodder magazine, welcome to the West Coast Eastwood blog and consequently the 41st edition of the West Coast Report. For those that have been patiently waiting since last April 12 when the 40th edition of the West Coast Report last appeared, thank you for your patience. Mental patients, metal patience, artichoke smoothies, there’s a tech story title in there somewhere. Oh, and talk about cool the massive Eastwood blue tool cabinets behind the flames are located in Street Rodder magazine’s Irvine, California, air-conditioned tech center.
    —John Gilbert

    WCE-41-02

    Where were you in ’62? Eastwood founder and CEO Curt Strohacker knows exactly where he was. Curt was a 14-year old gearhead kid enjoying the ’62 Southside Winter Nationals and there’s a historic photograph to document the occasion. Wayne Bryant from Omega Photos snapped a shot of Curt and his buddy peering under the hood of a ’57 Chevy Bel-Air drag car known as “Shake Rattle & Run.”

    WCE-41-03

    The December 30, 1962 USAC sanctioned event happened once again in 1964, and has gone down in auto racing history as the indoor drags. According to Curt it was wilder than blimp bowling on blindfolded elephants in celebration of Oktoberfest. Okay those weren’t Curt’s exact words not even close, but when I spoke with Curt he said it was a wild event with cars crashing into the walls, and rubber smoke billowing through exhaust fumes so thick one could hardly see or breathe. The gargantuan building’s polished cement floors provided a slick surface that today’s drift racers can only dream about.

    WCE-41-04

    The Chicago International Amphitheater was the venue. Torn down in 1999, it was a massive structure built in 1934 to house the International Live Stock Exhibition. ¬¬In addition to hosting momentous bovine spectacles the arena was where Elvis first donned his Gold Lame suit in 1957, and the Beatles appeared on stage in 1964 and ’66. The reason cars were crashing into the walls was if a guy didn’t have his dragster pointing dead straight as he was going through the eyes he’d stuff it into the narrow doorway separating the Amphitheater’s cement walls. Incredibly the final stage of the shutdown area was an immediate exit out into the parking lot... lending a new significance to the expression, Holy Cow! To learn more Google “indoor drag racing” that will pull up a proverbial wealth of both visual and textual information regarding this most unique of all drag racing spectacles.

    WCE-41-05

    The grand spectacle of indoor drag racing is a testimonial to the hardcore passion Chicagoland gearheads have held for all things automotive since the automobile industry’s birth in the late 1800s. The first of its kind anywhere Eastwood opened a new store in Alsip, Illinois, that has become a destination point for anyone that loves automobilia.

    WCE-41-06

    Here’s a little something for the Shelby Mustang lovers out there a completely original unmolested example of a ’66 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350-H. It did have an engine change, but the original Shelby prepped hi-po 289 is still kept with the car in crate form.

    WCE-41-07

    In 1966 I was 14-years old when my mom and I flew from Los Angeles, to Detroit, Michigan to spend the summer at the family farm in Stockbridge. The first cars I spotted as our American Airlines 707 touched the ground was a Hertz parking lot full, and I mean full of black and gold, and white with blue ’66 Ford Shelby Mustangs.

    Source: May 1966 Car and Driver archived road test. “Shelby has contracted to supply Hertz with one thousand GT 350s, designated the GT 350H ("H" for Hertz). Most of these special GT 350s will have the new high-performance automatic transmission, although a limited number will be available with 4-speed manual transmissions for the do-or-die purists. Said puristi will have to join the Hertz Sports Car Club, the qualification for membership being a demonstration of your ability to operate a manual gearbox.”

    WCE-41-08

    “Finned, cast aluminum rocker covers and sump are bolted on, as is a high-riser intake manifold and a big 4-barrel carb with 1.7-inch venturis and center-pivot floats so it won't cut out in turns. This, along with fabricated steel headers and low-restriction mufflers, boosts the horsepower figure by 35, to 306 @ 6000 (vs. stock 271 @ 6000), and the torque from 312 lbs-ft. @ 3400 to 329 lbs-ft. @ 4200. Final touches include the rear brake scoops, a new hood with a big air scoop and NASCAR-style hood pins, plexiglass rear quarter windows in place of the regular Mustang fastback's vent panels, a cleaned-up grille with the Mustang emblem offset to the driver's side, and the stripes.”

    Have you ever called a Mustang GT350 that you spotted in public as a fake? It could have been you were looking at a ’65 as ‘65s didn’t have the plexiglass quarter windows, or brake scoops. Car and Driver in its May ’66 article spoke to the low quality of Shelby produced cosmetic components. “We also found fault with the rear seats and quarter windows. Construction of both was rough-and­ ready, and in poor condition after only 5000 miles. The upholstery was beginning to tear, the trim was starting to come loose, and rain leaked around the plexiglass window. The rear seats are none too comfortable, but, surprisingly, better than the last notchback Mustang we drove. But it's a sports car, not a bloody bus, and besides, few of our complaints would bother the man who only rented the car.”

    I prefer to gather restoration research from magazines of the day as I believe important details are lost to the memory of a current articles author... in particular recollections of an Internet wizard. “The hood and its scoop look the same as before, but last year it was molded fiberglass, this year stamped steel. Inside, the change is more pronounced. The '65 GT 350s had standard Mustang instrumentation plus a pod atop the dash housing a tach and oil pressure gauge. The steering wheel had a wood rim and considerably less "dish" than the standard wheels, and the horn was operated by a spring-return toggle switch on the fascia.”

    WCE-41-09

    Were the Hertz Shelby Mustangs the original rent-a-racer? “There isn't any significant difference between the GT 350 you can buy and the Hertz version. The standard GT 350H color scheme is black with two broad gold stripes—a sensational, crowd-stopping combination. Other color schemes are available, including the regular GT 350's white with two broad blue stripes. A trio of narrower stripes along the rocker panel are interrupted by a "G.T. 350H" nameplate behind each front wheel. All the Hertz cars have the "occasional" rear seats and "mag-type" wheels that are options on the GT 350. Incidentally, the "H" might well stand for "Homologated" if Shelby—or, for that matter, Hertz—wanted to race the car as a Group 2 sedan; the 1000 examples Shelby will produce for Hertz fulfill the FIA's minimum production requirement.”

    WCE-41-10

    “Standard high-performance, 271 horsepower Mustangs are delivered to the Shelby American factory near Los Angeles International Airport, where they are rebuilt to GT 350 specifications. Wide-base wheels and 130-mph 7.75 x 15 Goodyear Blue Streaks are fitted, as are trailing arms at the rear, a one-inch anti-sway bar at the front, and Konis all around.
    The front suspension geometry is altered, the steering speeded up, and a chassis brace is installed across the engine compartment between the upper shock mounts. The front brakes are 11-inch Kelsey-Hayes discs with heavy-duty pads; the rear brakes are 10 x 3-inch drums (3/4-inch wider than stock) with sintered metallic linings.
    Finned, cast aluminum rocker covers and sump are bolted on, as is a high-riser intake manifold and a big 4-barrel carb with 1.7-inch venturis and center-pivot floats so it won't cut out in turns. This, along with fabricated steel headers and low-restriction mufflers, boosts the horsepower figure by 35, to 306 @ 6000 (vs. stock 271 @ 6000), and the torque from 312 lbs-ft. @ 3400 to 329 lbs-ft. @ 4200. Final touches include the rear brake scoops, a new hood with a big air scoop and NASCAR-style hood pins, plexiglass rear quarter windows.” Don’t forget to watch “Turd Pickers” the History Channel’s new show based on a Beverly Hills family that makes a living mining gold from the sewers below the gold-paved streets of California.

    WCE-41-11

    Here’s the indoor drag’s run sheet from December 30, 1962. Pretty cool stuff, you can Google the car’s owner name and its make and come with some the participants that went on to become very famous drag racers. In particular Google “Shake Rattle & Run.”

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  • The Bonneville experience in SoCal- El Mirage Dry Lake Racing

    Going fast has been a fascination since the beginning of time. Before motorized vehicles our ancestors were racing horses and horse carriages. As time went on and cars were invented, man has become obsessed with going as fast as possible in a motorized vehicle. These days drag racing is a BIG thing and every weekend people get together to watch men and women launch themselves down the 1/4 and 1/8 mile paved race track. You may not realize it, but drag racing and high speed runs in motorized vehicles originally started in dry lake beds. Back in the 30's a few car clubs filled with racers came together to form the SCTA (Southern California Timing Association) and create a set of rules and regulations for land speed racing on the dry lakes. Today the SCTA is still around and runs on one of the first dry lake beds (El Mirage) where it all started.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • SEMA 2013 Day 3 Coverage

    Most Automotive shows and events Day 3 is when things start to slow down. This isn't the case at SEMA. The show has SO MUCH to see that even for myself that's four days in; I was still finding new cars and products I hadn't seen before. I haven't even hit all of the buildings in the show and I have shot hundreds and hundreds of photos and I still feel like I'm missing a lot of good stuff!  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • SEMA 2012- Eastwood Company Part 3 Coverage

    Traditionally a lot of show cars, especially SEMA cars were known to be mostly all "show" and not a car you could drive on the street or the track. Many people even joke that these cars never see the road and are even pushed on and off the trailer (some still are but we won't point fingers!). For instance if it was a paint company they would have a stock car with beautiful paint and shiny wheels.. but underneath and inside nothing was done to enhance the car, while speed parts companies had cars that had a insane engine in a car that didn't run or couldn't even drive.. all ends of spectrums had cars that showed off their specific niche, but few had the "complete" package.

    These days the overall quality of show cars has risen and many of the cars are streetable-borderline race cars with a show car exterior and interior. It isn't uncommon to see a muscle car with the full suspension, wheel and tire combo, and big brakes to allow it to go around a road course as fast as an Italian sports car. It's quite mind-blowing when you look at how much fabrication, engineering, and design work has gone into these cars to allow them to be winners on the show field AND monsters on the track. The buzz term these days seems to be "Pro-Touring". Many classic cars are themed this way.. but I mean who wouldn't want the best of everything!

    Here's another batch of show vehicles from SEMA. Stay tuned as we dig through more pictures and video!

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  • Street Rodder Road Tour 1940 Ford Nearing Completion- reassembling a 1940 Ford

    The last time we checked in with Street Rodder and Hollywood Hot Rods the paint on the body was still wet. Since then they've been busy getting the car ready for the first leg of the Street Rodder Road Tour and it's unveiling this weekend. We got these sneak peeks from the crew over at Street Rodder Magazine just the other day.

    After rolling the car back to Hollywood Hot Rods from the paint shop, Troy and crew were ready to start buckling down and assemble the Ford. This is the fun part most times, but it is a tedious process installing all of those freshly painted, chromed, and powder coated parts!

    With the exterior starting to look pretty complete, they moved on to the interior. The team decided to go for a classy, but custom retrim in the 40 Ford. They had some help from a local interior shop to help them meet the deadlines, but it is coming together great. We are loving the color-matched piping details, it really pulls it all together!

    With the Ford looking more like a complete car Troy and his crew moved on to mounting up the drivetrain and making the new Ford Racing Coyote V-8 crate engine live. They opted to go with electronic fuel injection to get the most power out of the engine AND the best fuel mileage possible (for a flowed 5L 302 Mustang Boss Engine that is!). Instead of screwdrivers, carb synchs, and their ears, these guys are using a computer to tune the engine so this car will run as well as the latest pony car from the Ford stable.

    With things really coming down to the line for the Road Tour and the debut this weekend the team at Hollywood Hotrods is really buckling down. Stay tuned for the finished pictures of this beautiful 40 Ford and make sure you come out to the kickoff of the east coast leg of the tour on July 14th at the Eastwood Summer Classic! Thanks for watching and we'll see you in July!

    -Matt/EW

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