Tag Archives: rod

    • Straightening the Heavily Dented Roof- Eastwood MIG Stud Weld Kit

      Pilehouse didn't live a charmed life, it was used and abused as a farm truck, then sat for many years in the woods. Mother Nature has really left her mark on the truck. From the scratches and scrapes, to HUGE dents and smashed in sections, some would say I'm a masochist for taking on such a project. I've always liked a challenge and I thought straightening the roof would be just that.

      Some of the dents on the roof were fixed by metal bumping them back into shape with the Eastwood Pro Hammer and Dolly Kit, but other areas weren't so easy. I found a few pesky dents that were in areas I couldn't get to, or were simply creased and needed some pulling before I worked them with the hammer and dolly. We recently released a new MIG Stud Welding Kit that was perfect for the job. This kit allows you to turn your MIG welder into a stud welder. I've always hated using a traditional stud welder. It's bulky, heavy, and hard to get a solid weld with. It's pretty simple, just add the MIG Stud nozzle to the end of the MIG gun and slide a stud into the nozzle. Then just hit the trigger for a couple seconds and I've got a firmly attached stud for pulling dents.

      Below is the damage I was repairing. It looks like a sharp edge scraped against the roof and really did a number on this spot. After Stripping the paint and surface rust, I had bare metal to weld my studs to.

      I began welding studs into the deepest portion of the crease and using the slide hammer to pull the dent out. I like to leave the studs in place until I've got the dent roughly pulled out. This way I can come back and give a couple more pulls on the slide hammer if an area didn't quite pop out like I wanted.

      After I got the dent roughed out, I cut off the studs and used a flap disc to take the stud welds back down to the surface. I then like to check the area with the palm of my hand for low spots I missed. This crease came out after only a handful of pulls and you can see below it's MUCH better. It only took a little more hammer and dolly work to have it ready for a skim coat of filler, then primer. If you have the patience you could eventually metal finish this area perfect and only use primer. This whole project took 30 minutes, so I'd say repairing this crease was a relatively easy job (I wish all repairs were this easy!).

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    • David Chambers- 48 Plymouth

      "In 2010, I fulfilled m y contract with the US Army, as a disabled combat soldier. I entered automotive school shortly thereafter, and graduated this past Aug.The entire time I was in school,I was doing my best to pay off debt from when I was younger and less concerned with the future, but never made much progress. I've only just found a job, as a fabricator. It not being my chosen field, I'm not left much room to work on my cars, nor save up to purchase the equipment I need to do what I love, restore and customize cars and motorcycles. I've acquired a few tools here and there, but I still lack the larger, more expensive tools, even a welder. I don't even have a garage to work out of. I've worked to be a productive person as much as I can, but keeping m y head above water is a struggle on m ost days. I do my best to maintain a positive attitude, and work as hard as my body lets me, but debt collectors seem to enjoy reminding me that no matter how hard I work, the money I earn, isn't mine. I admit things could be worse, so I don't ask for hand outs, but after a while, desperation takes over. I need a hand. I don't need a miracle. I just need a welder and a few other things. I need to start doing what I love again. I have a 48 plymouth that I love, but the floor is nearly gone, and the rockers are rotting through. I need these things, so I can make my life about fabricating, not just wishing."

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    • Steve Hall- 1932 Ford

      "My father in law had owned this 1932 Ford five window street rod for the past 40 something years.About 10 years ago he started the process of doing a frame off restoration to this car when his wife was diagnosed with cancer. He put the street rod project aside and devoted the next several years taking care of her. She lost her battle to cancer a few years back. He just never regained the desire to start back on the car. I feel like it was due to the fact that there was so much history with the car and his wife since she loved the car as much as he did. The car has just sat in his garage covered up since she passed away.About a year ago he contacted me to see if his daughter and I wanted the car so we could works towards completing it. I was happy as a pig in mud until I realized that I was a little in over my head and lacked the skills and the tools needed to complete this project. On top of all that I am in the floor covering business and as you can imagine the construction and remodeling business has been unbelievably slow these past few years and I am now working a third more hours for half the pay I used to get so the lack of extra tim e and m oney have m ost definitely put a dam per on this project. There is nobody anywhere that would appreciate some help with their project more than I would. My father in law is up in years and I would love to complete this car and see him take it for a drive while he is still able. Thank you for considering my project."

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    • Craig Bresley- 1956 Buick Super

      "I drive a school bus part time. I'm a disabled OIF Veteran. My wife is currently serving. I have a 1956 Buick Super that I have been working on for over a year but its got a long way to go! The shock mounts on the rear are busted off so it bounces with the wind! The transmission leaks so bad Im afraid to drive it and risk burning it up. Everything I have done to it has been on the cheap(spray can primer, blankets for seat covers). I would love to have the Super drive-able so I could have family outings in it. Not asking for full custom, just drive-able." -Craig Bresley

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    • America's 5 Greatest Muscle Cars...Do You Agree?

      1970 Dodge Charger

      You know how it is when you're at a car show...you're shooting the bull with the boys when the discussion gets around to muscle cars. Everyone's got an opinion on what the top American muscle cars are, and each muscle car fan has his or her own "list".

      But I came across this list on the SenseTheCar.com blog, and to me it's hard to argue with the choices (as long as it's not listed in any particular order!).

      The cars are listed below. If you disagree, feel free to give us your list in the comments section below.

      Dodge Charger
      Immortalized forever as the "General Lee" in the TV show, "The Dukes of Hazzard".

      Pontiac GTO
      "Critics in its day pointed out the sluggish steering, sparse interior and unsteady brakes, but once the GTO hit a straight line, it blew its competition out of the water."

      Chevrolet Chevelle
      "...in 1970, Chevrolet released a bombshell with the Chevelle SS and its jaw-dropping 450-horsepower engine."

      Chevrolet Camaro
      "One of the longest-lived muscle car models, thanks to its persistent popularity."

      Ford Mustang
      "The most successful muscle car of all time...synonymous with the kind of raw power and thrills the world expects from a brilliant piece of American engineering."

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