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Tag Archives: rot

  • Buyers Guide: When to Use Rust Encapsulator VS. Rust Converter

    Our tech team answers a lot of technical calls and emails each day and there are a lot of common questions asked and advice given. Many of them are about when and where to use our different coatings and paints. Rust products might be the most confusing as far as when to use them and which one is correct for your rust situation. I decided to put together this quick article to help you decide when you should use Rust Encapsulator vs. Rust Converter.


    Rust Encapsulator

    Rust Encapsulator is one of our oldest and most well known products we sell. We've been an innovator in rust treatments and this product has stood the test of time. Encapsulator is probably the safest and most universal of our rust products as it doesn't much care what it is applied over. Below are some examples of situations where Rust Encapsulator is ideal and where another product may be better.

    Ideal Encapsulator Uses

    1. Surface Rust- Encapsulator will easily go over areas of surface rust and stop the rust from spreading. One medium coat usually covers light surface rust.

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    2. Medium Rust- This is rust that is more than just surface or flash rust, it may have started to lightly pit the metal, but hasn't started to affect the rigidity of the metal. Start by wire wheeling or mechanically removing any loose rust and apply 2-3 medium coats to get complete penetration into the rust.

    3. Bare Metal- Rust Encapsulator can be used over bare metal, but I wouldn't suggest it over an epoxy or etch primer if you ONLY have bare metal to deal with. It can be used to quickly seal bare metal in a pinch to avoid flash rusting as well.

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    4. Mixed Surfaces- Rust Encapsulator is the best rust product to apply over surfaces that might vary in grades of rust, have bare metal or old paint present. If you have an area that you cleaned to bare metal or repaired and there's still rust around that area, I'd suggest Rust Encapsulator.

    Poor Uses

    While Rust Encapsulator can be applied to almost any surface, it isn't always the best option. Below are instances where we'd suggest a different product for the best results.

    1. Over rubberized undercoating or heavy duty anti-rust- Undercoating and Anti-Rust are great products for undercarriage, or hidden areas on a vehicle but using Rust Encapsulator over them is unnecessary and isn't using the product to it's full potential. I absolutely prefer to use it as a base under rubberized undercoating for piece of mind.

    2. In hidden, boxed, or hard to reach areas- Rust Encapsulator needs some basic prep before application (wire brush loose rust and degrease with PRE). It also needs complete coverage to properly stop the rust and it can be tough to get it to cover properly on an area that hasn't been prepared completely. For hidden, boxed, and hard to reach areas we suggest our Internal Frame Coating.

    Rust Converter

    Rust Converter is a coating that will convert heavy rusted areas into a protective polymeric coating with little prep. This product works well when used as directed, but doesn't have room for error when it comes to using it on the incorrect surfaces. Rust Converter NEEDS 100% rust present in order for it to work correctly and to fully cure. The surface does need to be top coated after cured. For the best protection we suggest to apply Rust Encapsulator over the Converter and then top coat.

    Ideal Uses

    -Medium Rust- Areas that are completely covered in substantial rust are ok to use Rust Converter on as long as it isn't mixed with bare metal or other coatings around it.


    Photo Sep 18, 2 39 33 PM

    -Heavy, Flaky Rust- Rust Converter works best on rust that is HEAVY. This would be scaly rust that has begun pitting the surface and has covered all of the metal. We still suggest to knock off (wire brush/wheel) the loose, flaking rust before applying the product. The goal is for the entire surface that is rust to turn a purplish-black once the converter has finished curing. It may take 2-4 coats to fully convert a surface.

    Poor Uses

    Photo Sep 18, 2 40 29 PM

    -Bare Metal- DO NOT EVER apply Rust Converter over bare metal. This product needs 100% rust present for it to work. In fact virgin, clean metal could actually flash rust if Rust Converter is applied and left on it.

    Photo Sep 18, 2 39 56 PM

    -Mixed Surfaces- Rust Converter needs 100% rust present in order for it to fully cure. This means it won't work completely on areas that are a mix of rust and bare metal, or a mix of original paint and rust. If you're trying to treat small rust spots that have paint surrounding them (that we assume you don't want to damage) you can use Fast Etch to saturate the area and get into those small rust spots. Then touch up with paint as needed.

    -Painted or coated surfaces- This product won't work on bare metal areas to protect or prevent from rust. If applied to areas that are painted or used to coat for prevention the Rust Converter won't fully cure and the surface will stay sticky.

    If you follow these quick guidelines you can quickly determine if you need Rust Encapsulator or Rust Converter. Feel free to drop us a comment if you'd like to see a buyers guide for any other product.


  • Patching Fender Rot

    It seems like all we talk about when working on Project Pile House is the rust and body damage it has.. but again today we're covering the repair of more rust that's on the truck. This time it's on the sides of the fenders where the cab mounts attach to the fenders. Originally they sandwiched multiple pieces of metal together and riveted the mount through them for additional support on the fenders. This spot is very prone to rusting on these trucks and should definitely be addressed. On Pile House both fenders were rusted badly and the rot was covered with a heavy coating of body filler to hide the damage. In my effort to clean up the exterior of the truck, I wanted to get rid of the rust and rivet heads when making the repair. In the end, I modified the cab-to-fender mounts so I could spot weld them to the fenders after positioning the fenders to get an even gap where the doors and fenders met. This was pretty boring, time consuming, and hard to photograph.. so I'll save you the winded post about that process in this update, and focus on repairing the rust and smoothing the fenders.

    The first thing I do when making a repair like this is to use painters tape to mark out the area I want to remove and repair. I usually tape off just a little further out than the rusted area so I can be sure that I'm into good metal when welding the patch panel in place. It's really difficult to weld thin, heavily pitted metal, so it's best to remove a little more so you can get a clean area to work with.

    The other nice thing about the painters tape is that it gives a nice straight line to follow as you cut out the area you're repairing. I chose a 4 1/2" Electric Angle Grinder with a cutting disc to make the cuts. I just put the edge of the cutting disc against the inside edge of the tape and followed that as I made the cut.

    Once I had the cancerous areas removed, I cleaned the area surrounding the hole with a flap disc. With the area prepped, I could then make a pattern of the patch panel I needed. I chose to use a manila folder as my pattern, although you can use thin cardboard, chipboard, construction paper, or any other thick paper product. Chipboard is often the best to use as it behaves the most like sheet metal, but construction paper or a manilla folder will work ok as well (and is easier to find). Once I traced and cut out the patterns for each patch panel, I transferred the pattern to the metal and cut the rough shape from 18 gauge steel with the Electric Metal Shears. Once I had the rough shape cut, I could then trim the piece to shape with a set of Eastwood Aviation Metal Snips. After I had the patch panel close to the size I needed, I used the curvature of the fender to give the patch panel a slight contour to match the fender. Alternatively you could use a pipe form, a Slip Roll, or even an English Wheel to shape the panel. But in this case, the curve needed was so slight, using some muscle and the fender as a form, gave me the shape I needed.

    On this repair, I chose to use a set of Intergrip Panel Clamps to gap and hold the patch panel in place. Then the Eastwood MIG 175 to weld it all together. The key with using the intergrips is to use the aviation snips to carefully cut the panel just a bit smaller than the opening so that the mounting plate for the intergrips can slide between the old and new metal. This allows your welds to bridge and fill the gap.

    Once the new metal is clamped in place with the Intergrips I used a flathead screwdriver to get the panel centered in the opening and began laying a few quick tack welds to attach the new metal in place. From here I like to move my intergrips around and tighten them in place after each tack weld to get the patch panel flush with the surrounding metal. On a curved panel like this it's important to make sure the curve of the seam matches. Once the patch panel is tack welded in place and lined up correctly I removed the Intergrips.

    Now that the patch panel is tack welded in place, I began stitch welding the joint closed. I like to jump around the panel making quick, hot welds. On a patch this small I had to be careful not to introduce too much heat into the panel and warp the metal. I like to keep a blow nozzle from the compressor handy to hit the welds and metal with cool, compressed air every few welds. I make sure the panel is warm or even cool to the touch before I continue laying stitch welds. If the metal is too hot to touch with your bare hands, you shouldn't introduce anymore heat into the panel until it cools. After some time I ended up with fully stitch welded patches that didn't have any major warpage.

    After I've made sure the panel is fully welded, I used the flap disc on the angle grinder to grind the proud welds down. The key is to grind across the welds so they're flush with the surrounding metal. If ground too much, the weld joint will be thin and weak. With this repair method you should be able to grind the welds pretty much flush with the surrounding metal. I then used the Eastwood Pro Hammer and Dolly Kit to bump up any low spots from welding. For now I sealed the repair area with Eastwood Self Etching Primer until I'm ready to lay body filler, primer, and top coat.

  • How to repair rust- Fixing a rusty windshield cowl

    So you decided to give your car a refreshing new look and it's time to strip it down to prepare the car for paint. You can count on finding some sort of surprise when tearing the vehicle down. Whether it's hidden accident damage, previous repairs, or the mummy of a dead animal; it's always an adventure when stripping a car or truck down for paint or bodywork.

    I recently started tearing into my "clean" (for the east coast at least!) 1977 VW Scirocco I've owned for a few years. It had some wear and tear and some bubbling paint I wanted to address before it got a fresh lick of paint. When I began removing the fenders I was pretty surprised to find some rot in the inner fender and windshield cowl. I decided to take some photos as I repaired this area and share some tips for making a repair that will look original when done.

    Here is the offending area when I removed the fender. The worst rot was in an area that sandwiched between the fender and cowl and was covered with weather stripping. So from first glance it just looked like some bubbled paint, but that was the tip of the iceberg.

    I first cut out the area that was rotted until I got to solid metal and a nice seam where I could weld and blend the panel into the original metal.

    I started making my patch panel by bending up a piece of construction paper to the rough size I needed, then I transferred the rough shape over and cut it out of 20 gauge aluminized steel. Next I measured the other side and marked out the bend line I needed to make.

    In order to make a clean bend in the new metal I needed a metal brake. I decided to use the Versa Bend Sheet Metal Brake and put a crisp 90 degree bend in the panel on my line.

    With the patch panel now formed into the rough size I needed, I took it to the car and trimmed it to fit the opening. It's here that you want to make sure the patch panel fits tightly so that you don't need any excessive welding to fill voids.

    I then setup the MIG 135 with .023 Solid Core MIG Wire so I could lay small, flat spot welds on the patch panel. Setting the machine up on a similar piece of scrap metal helped me get my spot welds laying flat and penetrating correctly. After finessing the panel with Eastwood Hammers and Dollies and blending the welds with a flap disc on an angle grinder I was satisfied with the repair. I'm happy to say the patch panel looks close to original and the repair should be invisible once it has primer and a top coat on it. Now onto the next surprise!

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