Tag Archives: rust converter

  • Buyers Guide: When to Use Rust Encapsulator VS. Rust Converter

    Our tech team answers a lot of technical calls and emails each day and there are a lot of common questions asked and advice given. Many of them are about when and where to use our different coatings and paints. Rust products might be the most confusing as far as when to use them and which one is correct for your rust situation. I decided to put together this quick article to help you decide when you should use Rust Encapsulator vs. Rust Converter.


    Rust Encapsulator

    Rust Encapsulator is one of our oldest and most well known products we sell. We've been an innovator in rust treatments and this product has stood the test of time. Encapsulator is probably the safest and most universal of our rust products as it doesn't much care what it is applied over. Below are some examples of situations where Rust Encapsulator is ideal and where another product may be better.

    Ideal Encapsulator Uses

    1. Surface Rust- Encapsulator will easily go over areas of surface rust and stop the rust from spreading. One medium coat usually covers light surface rust.

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    2. Medium Rust- This is rust that is more than just surface or flash rust, it may have started to lightly pit the metal, but hasn't started to affect the rigidity of the metal. Start by wire wheeling or mechanically removing any loose rust and apply 2-3 medium coats to get complete penetration into the rust.

    3. Bare Metal- Rust Encapsulator can be used over bare metal, but I wouldn't suggest it over an epoxy or etch primer if you ONLY have bare metal to deal with. It can be used to quickly seal bare metal in a pinch to avoid flash rusting as well.

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    4. Mixed Surfaces- Rust Encapsulator is the best rust product to apply over surfaces that might vary in grades of rust, have bare metal or old paint present. If you have an area that you cleaned to bare metal or repaired and there's still rust around that area, I'd suggest Rust Encapsulator.

    Poor Uses

    While Rust Encapsulator can be applied to almost any surface, it isn't always the best option. Below are instances where we'd suggest a different product for the best results.

    1. Over rubberized undercoating or heavy duty anti-rust- Undercoating and Anti-Rust are great products for undercarriage, or hidden areas on a vehicle but using Rust Encapsulator over them is unnecessary and isn't using the product to it's full potential. I absolutely prefer to use it as a base under rubberized undercoating for piece of mind.

    2. In hidden, boxed, or hard to reach areas- Rust Encapsulator needs some basic prep before application (wire brush loose rust and degrease with PRE). It also needs complete coverage to properly stop the rust and it can be tough to get it to cover properly on an area that hasn't been prepared completely. For hidden, boxed, and hard to reach areas we suggest our Internal Frame Coating.

    Rust Converter

    Rust Converter is a coating that will convert heavy rusted areas into a protective polymeric coating with little prep. This product works well when used as directed, but doesn't have room for error when it comes to using it on the incorrect surfaces. Rust Converter NEEDS 100% rust present in order for it to work correctly and to fully cure. The surface does need to be top coated after cured. For the best protection we suggest to apply Rust Encapsulator over the Converter and then top coat.

    Ideal Uses

    -Medium Rust- Areas that are completely covered in substantial rust are ok to use Rust Converter on as long as it isn't mixed with bare metal or other coatings around it.


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    -Heavy, Flaky Rust- Rust Converter works best on rust that is HEAVY. This would be scaly rust that has begun pitting the surface and has covered all of the metal. We still suggest to knock off (wire brush/wheel) the loose, flaking rust before applying the product. The goal is for the entire surface that is rust to turn a purplish-black once the converter has finished curing. It may take 2-4 coats to fully convert a surface.

    Poor Uses

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    -Bare Metal- DO NOT EVER apply Rust Converter over bare metal. This product needs 100% rust present for it to work. In fact virgin, clean metal could actually flash rust if Rust Converter is applied and left on it.

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    -Mixed Surfaces- Rust Converter needs 100% rust present in order for it to fully cure. This means it won't work completely on areas that are a mix of rust and bare metal, or a mix of original paint and rust. If you're trying to treat small rust spots that have paint surrounding them (that we assume you don't want to damage) you can use Fast Etch to saturate the area and get into those small rust spots. Then touch up with paint as needed.

    -Painted or coated surfaces- This product won't work on bare metal areas to protect or prevent from rust. If applied to areas that are painted or used to coat for prevention the Rust Converter won't fully cure and the surface will stay sticky.

    If you follow these quick guidelines you can quickly determine if you need Rust Encapsulator or Rust Converter. Feel free to drop us a comment if you'd like to see a buyers guide for any other product.


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  • Rust Encapsulator FAQ

    Should I use the Rust Encapsulator as a sealer after treating rusted areas with Rust Dissolver? Can I, or should I just use a primer? - If you fully remove the rust down to clean bare metal with the Rust Dissolver, applying epoxy primer to the areas would be a good way to seal the metal. Rust Encapsulator can also be used in this case, but it should be used in any situation where all rust was not fully removed.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Rust Converter FAQ

    What happens if you sand to bare steel and just use as insurance? - Rust Converter needs the rust to properly work and cure (think of it as the catalyst for the product). Rust Converter is intended for heavier rust. If applied over bare metal, it will not cure properly and can actually cause light flash rust.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Rust Converter vs. Rust Encapsulator

    Let’s face it, we all have rust issues to deal with. Some projects are better than others, but it’s hard to find a project car or truck that has no rust at all, even if it comes out of the Arizona desert. Eastwood makes many products for dealing with different rust issues. Two of the best and most used products we offer are the Rust Converter and the Rust Encapsulator line of products.

    These products are both very different in their uses and application, but they both have the same purpose: to stop rust from ruining your project. Sure, in a perfect world we would all start with having the individual components of our project car acid dipped and media blasted down to the bare metal again. But, none of us live in a perfect world. The best we can do in most cases is get the car clean and dry, though still rusty, and proceed with chemical solutions.

    Rust Converter in Progress

    Eastwood Rust Converter is typically applied to the rust you just can’t remove. It works best with rust that is worse than just a surface discoloration. Rust Converter needs the rust to work; it’s like a 2 part system with the rust acting as the activator. If you were to apply the converter to bare metal it would have barely any affect, and would not cure properly. When applied over actual rust it reacts with it, converting it into a hard black polymeric paintable material. The converter however is not UV stable, and is not meant to be a top coat, it’s more like a paintable primer. You can use nearly any primer or paint over the top of rust after applying the Rust Converter. The best thing to apply though, to really guard against rust coming back, is the Eastwood Rust Encapsulator.

    Rust Encapsulator

    Rust Encapsulator can be applied over lightly rusted metal, or even clean bare metal, and seals it from moisture and corrosion. Plus, any rust still under it is encapsulated and stopped from spreading. For use around the shop, house or farm you can spray it directly and not even bother with a top coat of paint. Because of this Eastwood offers it in a variety of popular colors like red, white, grey, silver, black and safety yellow, as well as a clear coat.

    For restoring the underside, chassis and underhood areas or your project, we offer it in a regular black, and an even tougher rubberized Encapsulator Rubberized Rust Encapsulatorversion. The encapsulator flows into hard to reach spots, penetrates deep into the rust, and even fills in minor pinholes and surface imperfections. It’s so tough you can apply it to rusted body work, then apply body filler over top of it and still get full adhesion. The Rust Encapsulator should be the last step in your rust neutralization/removal work before starting with primer, paint and the rest of the finishing process.

    So there is the four-step process for fighting rust: 1) Chemical and mechanical stripping to remove the rust 2) Rust Converter to neutralize and convert the rust into a paintable surface 3) Rust Encapsulator to surround and seal any rust that is left and keep it from coming back 4) Prime and paint for long lasting rust proof and cosmetic purposes.

    Do all this and your car should look good for many years to come, even through New England winters.

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  • How To Remove, Treat, and Prevent Rust

    Rust is something we all must deal with at some point in our lives. Whether it’s maintaining your daily driver, restoring a classic, or just around the house, rust is a type of corrosion that never sleeps and is always attacking metal. Below are the common ways to prevent, remove and stop rust in its tracks.   Click Here To Read Full Post...