Tag Archives: Rust

  • Rust Encapsulator FAQ

    Should I use the Rust Encapsulator as a sealer after treating rusted areas with Rust Dissolver? Can I, or should I just use a primer? - If you fully remove the rust down to clean bare metal with the Rust Dissolver, applying epoxy primer to the areas would be a good way to seal the metal. Rust Encapsulator can also be used in this case, but it should be used in any situation where all rust was not fully removed.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Stop the Rust- How to Fix Rust Spots on your Car

    If you own anything made of metal there's a chance you're going to fight rust sometime in your life. If you own a car that's more than a few years old there's an even larger chance rust will creep into your life (there's a pun there). I decided to break down some common misconceptions about rust and give you a broad overview on how to fix those small rust spots on your car.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Rust Converter FAQ

    What happens if you sand to bare steel and just use as insurance? - Rust Converter needs the rust to properly work and cure (think of it as the catalyst for the product). Rust Converter is intended for heavier rust. If applied over bare metal, it will not cure properly and can actually cause light flash rust.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Rust Converter vs. Rust Encapsulator

    Let’s face it, we all have rust issues to deal with. Some projects are better than others, but it’s hard to find a project car or truck that has no rust at all, even if it comes out of the Arizona desert. Eastwood makes many products for dealing with different rust issues. Two of the best and most used products we offer are the Rust Converter and the Rust Encapsulator line of products.

    These products are both very different in their uses and application, but they both have the same purpose: to stop rust from ruining your project. Sure, in a perfect world we would all start with having the individual components of our project car acid dipped and media blasted down to the bare metal again. But, none of us live in a perfect world. The best we can do in most cases is get the car clean and dry, though still rusty, and proceed with chemical solutions.

    Rust Converter in Progress

    Eastwood Rust Converter is typically applied to the rust you just can’t remove. It works best with rust that is worse than just a surface discoloration. Rust Converter needs the rust to work; it’s like a 2 part system with the rust acting as the activator. If you were to apply the converter to bare metal it would have barely any affect, and would not cure properly. When applied over actual rust it reacts with it, converting it into a hard black polymeric paintable material. The converter however is not UV stable, and is not meant to be a top coat, it’s more like a paintable primer. You can use nearly any primer or paint over the top of rust after applying the Rust Converter. The best thing to apply though, to really guard against rust coming back, is the Eastwood Rust Encapsulator.

    Rust Encapsulator

    Rust Encapsulator can be applied over lightly rusted metal, or even clean bare metal, and seals it from moisture and corrosion. Plus, any rust still under it is encapsulated and stopped from spreading. For use around the shop, house or farm you can spray it directly and not even bother with a top coat of paint. Because of this Eastwood offers it in a variety of popular colors like red, white, grey, silver, black and safety yellow, as well as a clear coat.

    For restoring the underside, chassis and underhood areas or your project, we offer it in a regular black, and an even tougher rubberized Encapsulator Rubberized Rust Encapsulatorversion. The encapsulator flows into hard to reach spots, penetrates deep into the rust, and even fills in minor pinholes and surface imperfections. It’s so tough you can apply it to rusted body work, then apply body filler over top of it and still get full adhesion. The Rust Encapsulator should be the last step in your rust neutralization/removal work before starting with primer, paint and the rest of the finishing process.

    So there is the four-step process for fighting rust: 1) Chemical and mechanical stripping to remove the rust 2) Rust Converter to neutralize and convert the rust into a paintable surface 3) Rust Encapsulator to surround and seal any rust that is left and keep it from coming back 4) Prime and paint for long lasting rust proof and cosmetic purposes.

    Do all this and your car should look good for many years to come, even through New England winters.

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  • Removing Rusty Floor Pans (Hands On Cars E.03)

    Episode Summary:

    Using a rotisserie, an Eastwood MIG 175 welder, replacement stampings from National Part Depot and a BFH Kevin gets to work replacing the floorpans on the Zed Sled 1978 Chevy Camaro. After stripping the body shell inside and out, it’s apparent the floors are in much worse shape than initially thought. Luckily the under braces are still structurally sound, and the GM F-body has great aftermarket support, so replacement sheet metal is available. The toe boards, the area right under the dashboard, are not available but are relatively simple to make flat metal pieces. The next step is drilling out the spot welds on the braces, and marking and cutting the old floor out. Then the new one is laid so the location of the braces and edges can be marked with a sharpie.

    Back in the shop Kevin fits the car to the floorpans using the angle grinder, cut off wheel and a big freakin’ hammer. Next he copies the location of the original factory welds all the way around, and drills about a million holes. After a little more cutting and banging and drilling, the new pan is ready to go in. A handful of sheetmetal screws hold it in place temporarily, and a million little holes get MIG welded through to what’s left of the old floor.

    How to Remove & Replace Floor Pans: A Step-by-Step

    In this episode of Hands on Cars Kevin shows us how to remove the rusty old floor pans on the 1978 Chevy Camaro Z28 Zed Sled project car and fit new replacement metal. After stripping the car down to the bone, it become apparent things are worse than expected.

    step 1


    1: New floorboards were needed from National Parts Depot, as well as some custom fab work to replace the rusted out toe boards directly under where your feet go.

    step 2

     

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    2. When stripping the car, be sure to save things like rusty old brake and fuel lines to use as a template later for the new ones.

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    3: Eastwood PRE painting prep cleaner is used to wipe off all the protective rustproof coating on the new floorpan so it can be written on with a Sharpie and welded.

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    4: Lay the new metal on top of the old and it should be an exact match. Trace around the edges of new piece on the old floor and you instantly have a guide for cutting.

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    5: Cut out the old floor - There are several different ways to take out old floor pans and it depends on your budget and the car. If you have a plasma cutter you can make short work out of cutting out the old floor, if not a cut off wheel in an angle grinder, and maybe a Sawzall will do the same job, it will just take longer. Leave an inch or so of old metal all the way around to weld the new floor to.

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    6: Be extra careful to cut around the structural floor braces, you are going to want to reuse them if they are in good shape.

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    7: Once most of the floor is out, drill the spot welds holding the braces to what’s left of the floor with an Eastwood Spot Weld Cutter. When the spot welds are out finish the removal with an air chisel in just seconds, or manually with the big freakin’ hammer and an old chisel.

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    8: Use a handful of sheet metal screws and securely attach the new floor to the old edges.

    Screen shot 2014-10-29 at 2.16.33 PM

     

    9: Working from the underside, trace the edges of the old floor on the new one so you can more easily locate all the holes for the welds.

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    10: Take the new floor back out, and mark the location to drill for your eleventy billion plug weld holes. The structure of the unibody relies on the approximately 7000 plug welds GM used in the factory to tie it all together. Drilling holes in the new floor, and welding through to the old from the top helps pull it all together as you weld, for a more solid and water tight job.

    step 10

     

    11: Start drilling holes around the outside edges of the new floor, and the inner areas where it connects to the cross braces. Try to get as many welds as the factory used, and in the same locations for maximum structural rigidity. Make sure you have a good sharp bit before you start, in fact make sure you have a several spares as well.

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    12: Next finish prepping the edges of the old floor and the braces to be welded to. Eastwood Rust Encapsulater is a great preemptive measure to spray on the cross braces and any areas that you won’t be able to get at later when the floor is in.

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    13: The areas to be welded to should have been masked off first, those will be coated with an Eastwood self-etching weld through zinc primer which is made for situations exactly like this.

    step 12

     

    14: Temporarily attach the floor again with sheet metal screws, then start welding. The actual number of holes and welds is more like 300 vs than 7,000, but it still feels like a heck of a lot.

    step 14

    That's It

    And that’s it, your project car has new floors, once you finish all those little welds. There is still the matter of the toe boards, but that is a job for another day.

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