Tag Archives: sanding

  • How to Repair & Remove Scratches in Glass

    Owning a vehicle means experiencing scratches and dings on glass surfaces. Although excessively deep scratches in glass should not be handled with a DIY kit, as attempting this may cause optical distortion in the glass, most scratches can be removed and repaired using a surface scratch removal kit. In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to repair glass scratches using  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Street Rodder Road Tour 51 Ford Custom- More Metal Work, Filler, and sanding.. lots of it!

    The crew at Honesty Charley and Street Rodder Magazine have been doing a great job of keeping the 2013 Road Tour car under wraps. We've been bugging them for a while for some teasers and they finally shot us a few photos to keep us enticed.

    As we mentioned in previous posts, this car has had a lot of rust repair done already and equally as much custom work done. The work continues as they are whipping up some panels for the car using their Eastwood Shrinker Stretcher Set and Plastic Metal Shaping Mallets to build some panels that needed some shape built into them. Who can guess what part they're building in the photos below?!

    While some of the guys are working on some final metal fabrication, the rest of the team are starting on the body work in the areas they customized and repaired already. The tedious job of block sanding the car has been made a little easier with the use of Soft Sander Sanding Blocks and the Adjustable Flexible Sanding Blocks. The car is moving along quickly and we hear it should be getting some primer and color any day now. As soon as we smuggle some pics of the car in color you'll be the first to see it! Stay tuned!

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  • Project Resolution Phase 3 Teardown

    Since our last post we've been busy working on disassembling the car down to just a rolling shell. This meant we had to removed the entire drivetrain and start deciding if we were going to keep the original or get a replacement engine. The engine and transmission came out pretty easy when using the Folding Engine Hoist. We then separated the engine and transmission and put the engine on a Ford Small Block Rolling Engine Stand so we could easily move it around the shop.

    Meanwhile, some of the other members of the team worked on sanding the fenders and doors down to bare metal using the Eastwood Stripping Discs and then sprayed them with Eastwood Fast Etch to keep them from flash rusting while they wait their turn for bodywork and shiny paint.

    After looking over the engine we decided that this engine had been neglected for quite sometime and even the original waterpump was still on the engine! When Tim went to remove the bolts out of the waterpump just about every single one broke off. This is going to cause a lot more work as we now have to extract each broken bolt. This task will include removing the harmonic balancer on the crank and the timing chain cover to get to the bolts that broke. Let's hope this doesn't require some serious surgery!

    Once we were tired of fighting with broken bolts we moved on to removing the front radiator support on the car. This is NOT an easy job even on the best day. First of all you have to drill out numerous spot welds and the number of spot welds on each side of the radiator support are not equal. It seems like the spot welder in the factory just did however many felt right that day.. or two guys were spot welding on each side and one did way more than the other. The other problem we had was that the car has been hit in the front and some of the metal was bent and damaged. We took turns drilling spot welds with the Eastwood Spot Weld Cutters and slowly we were able to peel the old radiator support off of the front of the car. We'll have to do some hammer and dolly work to the remaining parts on the front end, but so far the CJ Pony replacement radiator panel seems like it will fit pretty well.

    Next up we will have to remove the damaged inner fender skirt panel and mock it all up to make sure the front sheet metal will sit correctly when we're done. Soon we'll be firing up the MIG 175 and the TIG 200 to weld these panels in place. Stay tuned, we're just getting warmed up!

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