Tag Archives: spot weld

  • How Do You Perform a Spot Weld on a Joint?

    Using a stitch welder to spot weld two pieces of metal together is useful when you have one piece with round holes in it that needs to be welded to another flat piece underneath. If you drill holes in one of your metal panels, clamp it completely flat over the other panel you want to weld it to. You should be able to see the base metal through the holes in the top panel. Too spot weld this joint together, simply place the electrode in each of the holes. Since the rod is arcing on the inner metal panel, complete penetration is assured.

    Now, all you have to do is simply fill in the panel holes with weld forming a “spot.” Remember that the best way to prevent burn through is to minimize the gap between each panel as much as possible. As always practice spot welding with your stitch welder electrode on drilled pieces of scrap metal before attempting to perform one on your vehicle.

    To learn more about joints and for more automotive articles, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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  • What is a Flange Joint and How Do You Perform One?

    When it comes to auto body patch panel installations, no joint is more useful than a flange joint. A flange joint is very similar to a lap joint except that the area that is overlapped on one of the metal pieces is lower than the rest, making both pieces at equal elevation when welding. ....  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Repair Rust With a TIG Welder- Rusty Door Skin Repair

    There's a handful of ways you can tackle repairing rust in your vehicle and all of them have their place. The most common would probably be cutting out the metal and MIG welding a patch panel in place. While this method is the easiest to accomplish, it can be difficult to blend the weld seam into the surrounding metal. I've done repairs this way for many years and they've turned out ok, but I've always wanted to master TIG welding patch panels and metal finishing the area for a seamless repair. I've recently begun switching a lot of my welding projects ....  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Eastwood Two Time Popular Mechanics Editors Choice Award at SEMA 2012

    Winning a new product award at SEMA is pretty exciting and every company at the SEMA show is eager to receive any type of recognition for their new products. Here at Eastwood we work every day to try and get you new innovative products you can actually use.

    This year at the 2012 SEMA show one of our items in the new product showcase was picked for an Editors Choice Award by Popular Mechanics Magazine once again. You may remember last year our Aerosol Injection won an award. This year our product designer Mark R accepted the 2012 award for our MIG Spot Weld Kit.

    Eastwood MIG Spot Weld Kit

    Mark and our R&D crew developed this product just like many of our products; he found a problem while working on his own restoration project and designed an affordable solution. Now you can save money and space by keeping the MIG spot weld kit on your welding cart. Just thread it onto your MIG gun when you want to use it without having to drag out another tool.

    We're honored to win the award two years in a row, and while many product designers would be feeling the pressure to go for a three-peat; we're just doing the same we've been doing for years.. bringing you affordable, innovative products to solve problems in the shop.

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  • The Top Tip to Make Seamless Sheet Metal Repairs

    Replacing door skins, quarter panels, and other patch panels can take a lot of practice to get perfect. We have found that there are a few little tips to make a seamless repair much easier. My favorite is the use of a "backing strip" to connect the new and old metal. Below is a crash course on how you can use some thin backing strips from our new Patch Panel Install Kit to make a seamless repair that will last the lifetime of the vehicle.

    First make your cut just above the damaged area. Be sure to clean the work area to bare metal and smooth out any sharp edges where the cut was made.

    Next, take a one inch backing strip out of the kit, and cut it to the length you need. Then use the supplied 3/16" drill bit to make evenly spaced holes in the original metal (do not drill holes in the backing strip).

    Now that the holes are drilled, take your backing strip and slide half of it under the original metal and clamp the two pieces together. We suggest using our Plug Welding Pliers. They have a copper support pad on them that helps reduce heat into the panel and helps avoid blow-through when making spot welds. The "V" in the top of the pliers makes it easy to pinpoint where you need to plug weld with the helmet down.

    Next you can plug weld the backing strip to the original metal. You may want to practice a few times on some scrap metal to get a nice flat spot weld. You should only be holding the trigger for a few seconds when making a spot weld. The result of setting up your MIG welder properly will yield results like below. Remember, the flatter the plug welds you make, the less final grinding and filler you need to do!

    Now that you have your backing strip in place, you can begin test fitting your replacement metal. Below you can see another reason why these backing strips are necessary in panel replacement; we can't always cut a perfectly straight line. Without a backing strip here, you'd have a tough time filling the gap without adding a small piece of metal. Trying to fill the void with weld would have caused major warpage in the metal.

    Once you have confirmed your replacement panel will fit correctly, you can drill plug weld holes with the 3/16" drill bit in the replacement metal. Refit the panel and plug weld it to the backing strip. Once the panel is attached, you can now slowly spot weld the seam between the new and old metal. Remember to jump around from end to end when spot welding. This will help keep the seam from warping and causing more work to get the repair area straight.

    Once you have the seam welded up, you can grind any "proud" welds down and proceed with sealer or filler. Use Eastwood Quality Flap Discs to properly blend the welds into the seam. No matter how small of an area, using this procedure when butt welding panels together can really make the difference in the final outcome of the repair.

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