Tag Archives: stud welder

    • Dent Repair FAQ

      Even with the modern advancements in the art of paintless dent removal, you still need the most basic of tools if you want to handle any and every dent repair. The number one and two tools you need are a good body hammer and dolly set.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
    • Even the best need guidance!

      Recently we added another "arsenal" to our auto body product line. Sometimes after hours, days, and even months of sanding filler and primer, you start to see "things". It makes you feel as if you are a shipwrecked sailor. You know the feeling, you're fine-tuning a dent that you had hit with the stud welder, laid some thin layers of filler over, and sanded diligently in between. All while running your hand along the panel to feel for low spots... before your eyes new low spots seem to "appear" and the original dent you started with seems to get even bigger!

      I've found that using a small bit of guide coat over a area you are filling or priming is very helpful in eliminating the doubts of a phantom low spot. Especially one that might show itself only after the car is painted and shiny. This is especially true for someone like myself that is a "novice" in the auto body field.

      Below I took some pictures of one of the bedsides on my 1981 VW Rabbit Pickup project. This truck originally had dealer installed bed rails that were used and abused to the max! So much so, that they had even pulled some of the threaded inserts out of the bed sides. Once I removed the bed rails, the bedsides looked similar to the water in your swimming pool after the kids have been playing in it for hours! Because I am going with a "clean" look for the truck, I will not be running bed rails in the future. This means I won't be able to hide the "waves" and oblong holes with the bed rail feet. So I began by using our hammer and dolly set to smooth out the major dents and high spots around the mounting holes. I then welded up the old mounting holes. I was then left with some smaller "waves" and low spots (and a couple pin holes in the welds), This is where the "sanding, filling, sanding more, filing more, sanding again" process occurred.

      Above you can see my first layer of Rage Extreme filler has been laid down. This Evercoat product is very user friendly. It is the first "pinhole free" body filler of it's kind according to them. I was a little skeptical, but after using it numerous spots on the body of this "field find", I had quickly forgotten about my glazing putty. I then blocked the area to 320 and I still felt like there was a small low spot right near the back end of the bedside. I sprayed the black guide coat (it also comes in TAN for those of you using a dark colored filler, or black primer) over the entire top of the bedside. I've found doing a extremely light coat over the area, holding the can about 12" away works best. You can see in the last picture it looks like a light bit of dust over the top of the beside.

      You can see in the first picture the sanding process halfway through. As you sand lightly, the majority of the guide coat sands off quite quickly. You will notice that low spots will leave behind the guide coat and pretty much outline the remaining low spot. In the second picture you can see as I had suspected, a noteworthy low spot. It is right where one of the mangled mounting holes for the bed rails was. I even took a picture of this area before I started the guide coat process (last picture in the series). Following this, I reapplied another concentrated coat of filler over the dent, block sanded to 320 again, and repeated the guide coat process. This eliminated the worries I had of having a the tops of the bedsides all wavy. I will surely be using the guide coat quite a bit when I put the body in primer next week!

      You can find the Rage Extreme filler and our new guide coats at the links below. Thanks for reading!
      Eastwood Guide Coat Black
      Eastwood Guide Coat Tan
      Evercoat Rage Xtreme Filler

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    • If it isn't broken, try making it better anyway!

      Here is another sneak peek into what we have been testing, designing and developing in our R&D department. Lately the shop has been buzzing, and I was able to snap off a few pictures and hold the guys down for a few minutes to get the scoop on what they were up to!

      Recently our first batch of new Eastwood Welders have hit our warehouse and we have been working on getting these out to all of our customers that had pre-ordered. Because of this, we decided we'd break open a welder and do some more "real world" testing. We decided to build something that one of our customers may work on themselves. Below is a few shots of one of our R&D guys Mark welding up a roll cage from local roll cage provider S&W race cars. This thing went together nicely and was a treat to weld! Mark laid out some quick beads and the pile of tubes started looking like "something" pretty quick! The production welders performed flawlessly, just as all of our test units had done. We are excited to hear some reviews on these new welders and check out some of your handy-work with one of these!

      With it getting to be show season, a big thing people are doing is polishing all the shiny bits on their ride. We have some additional/new buffing pads coming available in our catalog shortly. These are just in time for "polishing season"! Below you can see the assortment that Joe is trying out on a painted test panel. You can see how well the test piece shines with just the small portion he had done. Keep an eye out for these real soon! I know I'm excited to try them out on the lips of my new (to me) multi-piece race wheels I am refinishing!

      Here at Eastwood many of us are as much enthusiasts as our customers. Because of that we are always looking to hone our skills and learn as much as possible about any product we currently sell. Today we had a master auto body technician come in and do a tutorial on some important techniques when using our spot welder. I found this very informative, especially when it came to the correct time to use each of the accessories for the spot welder. We hope in return we can pass some of this knowledge to our customers when you may have any questions or concerns. We also filmed this stud welding class and we are planning to edit this into a comprehensive video that we will be hosting on YouTube and also on our site. We hope that you can benefit from these tips as much as we did!

      As always, thanks for reading and let us know if there is anything you'd like to read about or any topics you'd like more information about!

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