Tag Archives: technical

  • How Do I Adjust the Flow Rate of Shielding Gas?

    Whenever you are using a welding machine, like a MIG welder or a TIG welder, it is crucial that you know how to adjust the flow rate of shielding gas. When assembling and setting up your welder, once you connect your shielding gas regulator, the gas flow rate must be adjusted in order to assure that the right amount of shielding gas is flowing over your weld. If too little gas is flowing from your welder, excessive spatter and contamination can occur. If too much gas is flowing, you will be wasting your gas, which can negatively affect the result of your weld. Typically, there are two gauges on the shielding gas regulator, one to mark the gas flow rate and one to mark the gas tank pressure.

    The first thing to do to adjust the flow rate of your shielding gas is open your shielding gas tank valve the whole way. Adjust the knob on the regulator so that it is marked at about 30 CFH. Now, turn on the welder and trigger the torch switch so that the gas will start to flow. When you trigger the torch switch, the gas flow should cause the needle on the gas flow gauge to descend to a steady and accurate reading. Next, the gas flow should be set to about 20 CFH when it is flowing, which is the most common flow rate used when welding. Sometimes this needs to be readjusted as a slight breeze could alter the flow and weaken the shielding gas consistency surrounding the weld. Once you have adjusted the flow rate, you are free to weld. Just remember to close the gas valve on the bottle when you are finished welding.

    To learn more about welding and for more automotive FAQs, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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  • MIG Welding Duty Cycles

    When you are using an arc welding machine, you will need to understand what its duty cycle is as it will help you preserve the life and quality of your tool. On this page, you will learn about what a duty cycle is and how it is relevant to MIG welders, specifically.

    The MIG Welding Duty Cycle

    When you purchase a MIG welder, you will notice a specification on the packaging or in the manual called the duty cycle. This refers to the amount of welding that can be achieved in a given amount of time. The reason this specification is important is it informs the user of how long the MIG welder can work at its optimum level, since MIG welders, or any other welders, do not perform continuously as opposed to some other automotive tools that do.

    A perfect example of a duty cycle can be found in the Eastwood MIG 175 Amp Welder. The MIG 175 has a rated duty cycle of 30% at 130 amps. This means that the power signal of the MIG 175 should remain on for 30% of the time and off 70% of the time at 130 amps of power. If you look at your welding time in increments of 10 minutes, the duty cycle is a percentage of that 10 minute increment. In other words, with a 30% duty cycle at 130 amps, you can weld for three solid minutes and should let the welder cool off for seven minutes. You can increase the duty cycle percentage by turning down the amperage output, but going above the amp output (in this case, 130 amps) will yield a lower duty cycle. If you exceed the duty cycle and the breaker is tripped, allow the MIG welder to cool down for at least 15 minutes. A rated duty cycle on any MIG welding machine is there to protect you and your welder from any long-lasting damage.

    To learn more about MIG welding and for more automotive articles, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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  • Hollywood Hot Rods- How To Chop a Mercury with help from Eastwood

    By Jim Aust/Hollywood Hot Rods

    Every since the first sleek new 1949 Mercury hit the street crafty restylers have lusted after examples with the roof a bit lower than the factory offerings. Sam Barris was among the first to chop his own personal Mercury, and the process would be repeated thousands of times over the next seven decades. Just as the word “custom” implies, personally designed customs each have a unique style and equally unique method of creation.

    The guys at Hollywood Hot Rods have built a series of much loved custom vehicles so it’s only natural that they would have chopped a few Mercury’s along the way. Refining the process to a science, Hollywood Hot Rods get the job done lowering a lid on a Mercury (or any vehicle) with the help of various tools from The Eastwood Company. For this demonstration an Eastwood Shrinker/Stretcher is used to get a few of the vital steps in the process completed. Follow along as Hollywood Hot Rods shows how they lowered a roof on this 1951 Mercury.

    Chopping the top on a Mercury is so popular at Hollywood Hot Rods that they have to wait in line for their turn under the knife.

    The easy part is removing the top, the tough part is putting it back on correctly.

    After lowering the roof the desired amount, the corners of the windows now require reworking to close up the gaps created in the process.

    This view shows the great deal of work that will be necessary to reshape the rear corners of the quarter windows.

    The first step is to trim out the rear corners so that new corners can be fitted in place.

    To fill the corners small strips of sheet metal are cut and folded 90-degees in a sheet metal brake.

    Next up the Eastwood Shrinker/Stretcher is used to shrink one edge of the custom new pieces to replicate the look of the factory corners in the newly required radiuses.

    The newly fabricated pieces are carefully fit into in the trimmed out window corners.

    The new window corners are tacked in place and checked again for proper placement before final welding is completed.

    Once the final welding is finished the corners are shaped with a die grinder equipped with a barrel drum sanding head.

    On this particular chop the decision was made to round-off the upper rear door corners rather than retain the square factory style corners.

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    Rather than cut the original door corners into multiple pieces, Hollywood Hot Rods prefers to create new sweeping corner from fresh sheet metal.

    Repeating the earlier process, new inner door corners are made with the Eastwood Shrinker/Stretcher. Once the new door corners are in place they are welded and smoothed the same way as the window corners.

    Just a few steps transformed this Mercury from a stocker to show stopper! Hit the Hollywood Hot Rods Website to see more of their work, enlist their services, or buy some sweet HHR gear!

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  • Kevin S., Senior Product Marketing Manager- What Makes Us Tick

    What's your favorite Eastwood product? Why? Eastwood TIG 200 AC/DC welder. Having access to the advanced process of TIG welding at an affordable price is great. I have always wanted a TIG welder in my home shop, but could never justify the expense. The value of the Eastwood TIG 200 AC/DC welder has opened up the door to welding aluminum and stainless for me.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Where are the future technicians and product developers coming from? SEMA Has the Answer!

    Those of us in the restoration business have wondered about this question for a while, and our trade group, the folks over at SEMA (Specialty Equipment Market Association), answered by setting up the SEMA Memorial Scholarship Fund. As their web site says, the fund's purpose is "fostering the next generation of automotive aftermarket industry leaders and innovators."

    Many kids have a love of cars, and would be thrilled to be able to "marry" their appreciation for cars with their choice of livelihood. These scholarships are available for several career paths within the automotive industry—not just as a technician or professional restorer, but also in accounting, engineering, I.T., manufacturing, and many other related subjects. Wouldn't be surprised if a few ended up working at Eastwood!

    The SEMA Memorial Scholarship was created to help fund a full-time program of automotive-related study at an accredited university, college or vocational/technical program in the U.S. Awards range from $1,000 to $2,000, with $4,000 going to the top student selected. For all the details and contact information, click here.

    The online application will be available December 3, 2012.

    If someone you know has a desire to pursue studies leading to a career in the automotive aftermarket or related field, please send them to the link above. (Sorry, high school seniors are ineligible.)

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