Tag Archives: tig welder

  • How to Make A Free Tuck Shrinking Fork

    You may not realize it, but many of our Eastwood tools are dreamt up and prototyped the same way you build things at home. We have a problem or see a need for a tool to help do a job right and we build something ourselves. I recently needed to shrink the edge of a panel that was on a vehicle and I couldn't get a shrinker stretcher on it to shrink. An alternative method is to "Tuck-Shrink" the area and use a hammer and dolly to shrink the metal into itself. I decided to make my own homemade tuck shrink tool from some old tools for free I had laying around and show you the process.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • C-10 / C-20 Trailing Arm, Coil Spring Perch Rebuild

    The rusty trailing arms on my 1963 C-20 were about as bad as they come, so much so I could reach my hand through some of the rust holes.  About a year ago I stenciled out 3/16" plate and welded them on both sides of the arms in order to regain structural rigidity so I could drive it safely.  As you'll see in later pictures I have yet to weld in one of the plates but it is already cut and will be welded in soon.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Build Simple Engine Mounts for a Hot Rod

    To me building a hot rod or custom car is all about building with what you've got, using some ingenuity, and making things from scratch. Sure you can point and click with your mouse and buy a "hot rod in a box" from online vendors, but I think that those cars lose the soul that makes a hot rod so dang cool. Recently I built a chassis for a 1930 Ford Model A coupe I'm putting together and I needed to make some simple motor mounts to attach the Flathead to the chassis. I know you can buy some, but where's the fun in that?! I decided to show a simple way to make some mounts from scratch.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Convert your TIG Torch to a Gas Lens

    In the quest of perfectly colored stacks of dime TIG welds there are a few ways you can give yourself an advantage. One of them is to get optimal gas coverage and the ability to see the weld puddle better.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Fit Seat Sliders to Your Hot Rod Seat

    The older the car you're working on, the harder it can be to find usable parts you need. This becomes increasingly difficult when you get into cars that were short production or year runs. The iconic 1932 Ford is the most covenanted cars to build a hot rod out of. Being that they are a one year only body style, parts get expensive quick (especially original parts!). The seat slider mechanisms for an original '32 Ford seat are as rare as hens teeth and command a pretty penny when you do come across one complete! Recently my friend Ace asked me to help with the task of getting his reupholstered original seat to bolt into the car AND slide easily. I decided to take some photos along the way and show our low-budget (and fairly low tech) fix.   Click Here To Read Full Post...