Tag Archives: TIG Welding

  • How to Channel A Ford Model A

    Back in the late 1940's-1960's it was pretty easy to distinguish if a hot rod in a magazine was built on the east coast or on the west. One of the big differences is how the profile and stance of the car differed. An "east coast hot rod" was easily identifiable by its low ride height and body channeled pretty hard over the chassis without chopping or lowering the roof. It seems as the years went on guys were channeling and lowering their cars more and more until there was almost no ground clearance and no headroom from the raised floor.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Defining Tungsten for TIG Welding

    One of the defining elements of TIG welding is the Tungsten. In fact that is what the first letter in TIG stands for: Tungsten Inert Gas. TIG uses an inert gas to shield the weld (typically Argon), a filler rod of a metal that matches what you are welding, and an electrode made of Tungsten that focuses and directs the arc. All TIG electrodes are more than 95% Tungsten, which is a rare metal used because it is hard and has one of the highest melting points of any metal. There are at least 5 distinct types of “Tungstens”, as most people call them, typically color coated based on how much of what other elements have been added.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Build Simple Engine Mounts for a Hot Rod

    To me building a hot rod or custom car is all about building with what you've got, using some ingenuity, and making things from scratch. Sure you can point and click with your mouse and buy a "hot rod in a box" from online vendors, but I think that those cars lose the soul that makes a hot rod so dang cool. Recently I built a chassis for a 1930 Ford Model A coupe I'm putting together and I needed to make some simple motor mounts to attach the Flathead to the chassis. I know you can buy some, but where's the fun in that?! I decided to show a simple way to make some mounts from scratch.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to Convert Late Ford Banjo Rear End to Spring Over Axle

    When you're building old cars you sometimes have to work with "what you've got", especially when you're on a tight budget. If you're building a hot rod using period correct parts you may need to mix and match parts to get something that works for your particular vehicle.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • If You're Welding an Auto Darkening Helmet is NEEDED!

    The key to good welding is being able to see the metal.  Ditch those old standard lens helmets and get yourself an Auto-Darkening Helmet. You'll see light!, but not too much.  I remember when I learned to weld all I had was an old ARC welding helmet which was like trying to see through a black piece of paper.   The only time I was able to see what I was doing was after the arc was started but at that point it was too late if the weld was not in the right place.

    old helmet

    Auto-Darkening helmets are not new technology but many people are unaware of the benefits of using one.  Almost all welders on the market today come with a small fixed lens mask but thats only to get you started in case you don't already have an auto-darkening helmet.

    These masks are great because they only go dark when you are welding, as soon as the arc stops the lens isn't any darker than a pair of sunglasses.  Many of you know the struggle of having to constantly flip your mask up after every weld just to make sure its right.  Now you wont have to even touch the mask keeping your hands free to continue working.  An Auto-Darkening helmet also gives you the ability to adjust the level of lens shade.  This feature comes in handy if you do multiple types of welding since each requires a different level of shade to protect your eyes.

     

    comparison

     

    Would you believe that both of these pictures were taken under the same conditions.  On the left is a view through a standard fixed lens helmet.  All you can see is the faint outlines of the LED Work Light.  Imagine trying to see where to weld once your mask is on.  The view through an Auto-Darkening Helmet (right) is clear and bright, you can even read the side of the Eastwood MIG 250 on the other side of the bench.  Once your helmet is down rarely will you need to take it off in order to make small adjustments or to change position.

     

    P1020520

    You wont even need to take it off to change the settings on your welder.  Making current and wire speed adjustments just became so much easier and far less time consuming.  If you've ever used and Auto-Darkening Helmet its near impossible to weld again without one.

    Eastwood offers three different Auto Darkening Helmets that will bring your welding to a whole new level.  For a beginner welder these are a must have, you will find yourself making perfect welds in no time.  Click the pictures below to find out more info on each of Eastwood's Helmets

    Auto-Darkening Helmet

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    Large View Auto-Darkening Helmet

    large auto dark

     

    Extra Large View Auto-Darkening Helmet

    extra large auto dark

     

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

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