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Tag Archives: Tig

  • How to fabricate and install Heavy Duty Threaded Inserts

    Recently when channeling my Ford Model A I wanted to use Grade 8 fasteners for all of the body mounts instead of just tapping threads into the frame or inserting rivnuts that could fail over time. First of all the 1/4" wall of the tubing wasn't really thick enough to give sufficient threads to hold the weight and twist of the body from normal driving. We came up with a slick solution and figured we'd share.

    I started by threading a batch of Grade 8 nuts onto a carriage bolt and locking them all together.

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    I then mounted the bolt into the lathe and cut off the hex portion of each nut leaving us with perfectly round grade 8 threaded inserts. The nuts were cut down just a hair bigger than 1/2" so they would be a press fit into a 1/2" drilled hole.

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    I then counter sunk each hole and threaded a bolt into each insert so I could adjust them so they were straight in the holes. I used the TIG 200 to carefully lay a weld puddle on the edge of the threaded insert melting it to the frame. You must take your time here and be very precise because a rogue dab of filler rod could go over the edge of the threaded insert and make your life hell when it comes time to thread a bolt back into the insert!

     

     

     

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    Hopefully you can use this method to put some clean, strong threaded inserts in your next project.

    -Matt/EW

  • Defining Tungsten for TIG Welding

    One of the defining elements of TIG welding is the Tungsten. In fact that is what the first letter in TIG stands for: Tungsten Inert Gas. TIG uses an inert gas to shield the weld (typically Argon), a filler rod of a metal that matches what you are welding, and an electrode made of Tungsten that focuses and directs the arc. All TIG electrodes are more than 95% Tungsten, which is a rare metal used because it is hard and has one of the highest melting points of any metal. There are at least 5 distinct types of “Tungstens”, as most people call them, typically color coated based on how much of what other elements have been added.
  • How to Build Simple Engine Mounts for a Hot Rod

    To me building a hot rod or custom car is all about building with what you've got, using some ingenuity, and making things from scratch. Sure you can point and click with your mouse and buy a "hot rod in a box" from online vendors, but I think that those cars lose the soul that makes a hot rod so dang cool. Recently I built a chassis for a 1930 Ford Model A coupe I'm putting together and I needed to make some simple motor mounts to attach the Flathead to the chassis. I know you can buy some, but where's the fun in that?! I decided to show a simple way to make some mounts from scratch.
  • How to Convert your TIG Torch to a Gas Lens

    In the quest of perfectly colored stacks of dime TIG welds there are a few ways you can give yourself an advantage. One of them is to get optimal gas coverage and the ability to see the weld puddle better.
  • Quick TIG Tungsten Setup Tips

    When you're a beginner at TIG Welding there's a lot of steps to go through to lay a nice weld down. Getting a setting incorrect, or setting something up just a little off can be the difference between a gray mess of bird-turd welds and rainbow colored stacks of dimes. It's no secret TIG welding takes A LOT of practice and even with a perfectly setup machine it won't replace repetition and practice.

    Setting up Tungsten stick-out is something that a lot of beginners get confused with. There are some formulas out there to help you determine stick-out, but those don't always work in real world applications. It boils down to setting your torch up to match what you're welding. I have two quick tips that will help get your torch set up (or at least very close) in seconds. Use these methods until you're more confident in your torch setup and it will eliminate one of the stumbling points that beginners struggle with.

    1. Quick Stick-out Setup- After grinding you're Tungsten/Electrode you should have a nice taper on the tip. What I like to do is use the taper as my guide for how far the electrode sticks out past the cup. Get yourself close quickly by allowing the entire tapered portion to stick out past the cup. Tighten the torch down so just 1/16" or less past the tapered portion is visible outside of the cup. This setup is a good way to get you in the ballpark and it will work for welding on flat butt joints and many other common weld joints.

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    2. Use a Spare Tungsten Electrode- When welding a joint together other than a butt weld you may find that the method above may not work and the tip of the Tungsten could be too close or too far from the weld joint. A quick way for a beginner to get the stick-out correct is to lay a piece of the filler rod being used on the weld seam. You can then set your hand and torch where you'll be traveling across the work piece. Then pull your electrode out until it just about touches the filler rod laid in the seam. This will quickly get your electrode set to roughly the right height off of the work surface and with just the right amount of tungsten sticking out from the end of the torch.

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    These methods aren't super scientific, but they will get you close quickly and easily. Once you get more comfortable you will be able to eyeball the torch setup, but until then you can use these methods for setup and focus on perfecting other portions of the TIG welding process. I hope this helps a few beginners as it definitely helped me out in the beginning! Drop us a comment if you have any suggestions for future tech articles.

    -Matt/EW

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