Tag Archives: Tig

    • How Do I Adjust the Flow Rate of Shielding Gas?

      Whenever you are using a welding machine, like a MIG welder or a TIG welder, it is crucial that you know how to adjust the flow rate of shielding gas. When assembling and setting up your welder, once you connect your shielding gas regulator, the gas flow rate must be adjusted in order to assure that the right amount of shielding gas is flowing over your weld. If too little gas is flowing from your welder, excessive spatter and contamination can occur. If too much gas is flowing, you will be wasting your gas, which can negatively affect the result of your weld. Typically, there are two gauges on the shielding gas regulator, one to mark the gas flow rate and one to mark the gas tank pressure.

      The first thing to do to adjust the flow rate of your shielding gas is open your shielding gas tank valve the whole way. Adjust the knob on the regulator so that it is marked at about 30 CFH. Now, turn on the welder and trigger the torch switch so that the gas will start to flow. When you trigger the torch switch, the gas flow should cause the needle on the gas flow gauge to descend to a steady and accurate reading. Next, the gas flow should be set to about 20 CFH when it is flowing, which is the most common flow rate used when welding. Sometimes this needs to be readjusted as a slight breeze could alter the flow and weaken the shielding gas consistency surrounding the weld. Once you have adjusted the flow rate, you are free to weld. Just remember to close the gas valve on the bottle when you are finished welding.

      To learn more about welding and for more automotive FAQs, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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    • MIG Welding Duty Cycles

      When you are using an arc welding machine, you will need to understand what its duty cycle is as it will help you preserve the life and quality of your tool. On this page, you will learn about what a duty cycle is and how it is relevant to MIG welders, specifically.

      The MIG Welding Duty Cycle

      When you purchase a MIG welder, you will notice a specification on the packaging or in the manual called the duty cycle. This refers to the amount of welding that can be achieved in a given amount of time. The reason this specification is important is it informs the user of how long the MIG welder can work at its optimum level, since MIG welders, or any other welders, do not perform continuously as opposed to some other automotive tools that do.

      A perfect example of a duty cycle can be found in the Eastwood MIG 175 Amp Welder. The MIG 175 has a rated duty cycle of 30% at 130 amps. This means that the power signal of the MIG 175 should remain on for 30% of the time and off 70% of the time at 130 amps of power. If you look at your welding time in increments of 10 minutes, the duty cycle is a percentage of that 10 minute increment. In other words, with a 30% duty cycle at 130 amps, you can weld for three solid minutes and should let the welder cool off for seven minutes. You can increase the duty cycle percentage by turning down the amperage output, but going above the amp output (in this case, 130 amps) will yield a lower duty cycle. If you exceed the duty cycle and the breaker is tripped, allow the MIG welder to cool down for at least 15 minutes. A rated duty cycle on any MIG welding machine is there to protect you and your welder from any long-lasting damage.

      To learn more about MIG welding and for more automotive articles, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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    • What is a Lap Joint and How Do You Perform One?

      A common joint found in auto repair work, the lap joint is a piece where two pieces of metal overlap each other. An ideal lap weld should have a good amount of weld bead penetration without the upper edge melting back or overlaying. If the upper layer melts too much, the lap joint will be too weak and thin. Making lap welds takes a good amount of practice to get it right, so experiment with your welding angle, arc length and rate of stitching welder travel to find the best combination for you.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
    • Project Pile House Shaving and customizing the original dash and glovebox.

      While I had the column out I decided to start cleaning up the dash and sort out my brake pedal dilemma on the truck. In order to get under the dash for fabricating the new brake pedal setup and to shave and smooth the dash I needed to pull it out. ....  Click Here To Read Full Post...
    • How to Repair Rust With a TIG Welder- Rusty Door Skin Repair

      There's a handful of ways you can tackle repairing rust in your vehicle and all of them have their place. The most common would probably be cutting out the metal and MIG welding a patch panel in place. While this method is the easiest to accomplish, it can be difficult to blend the weld seam into the surrounding metal. I've done repairs this way for many years and they've turned out ok, but I've always wanted to master TIG welding patch panels and metal finishing the area for a seamless repair. I've recently begun switching a lot of my welding projects ....  Click Here To Read Full Post...