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Tag Archives: tools

  • Essential Items you Need To Start Off-Roading

    With more and more companies offering parts and supplies to upgrade your vehicle and get it trail-ready, we thought we'd put together our list of necessary items you should invest in when entering the Off-Road hobby. Some of these can be used at home and on the trail as well!
  • 5 Trail Items You Need on Your Truck

    When you're out on the trail your cell phone isn't going to save you. There's some key items you'll need to get your rig going when broken down or stuck on the trail. We decided to put together a short list of our favorite Eastwood products that are trail must-haves. These aren't the only items you need, but will definitely be key items for off-road vehicle survival!
  • How To Weld a Butt Joint

    One of the simplest welding joints is the butt joint. It is not the strongest, but it is one of the most useful especially for automotive body work. This type joint is used whenever you butt 2 pieces together and then weld between where the two meet. Butt welding thin sheet metal can be complicated because thinner metal has a tendency to burn through on the edges. This doesn't mean it's impossible, just that there are techniques that can be used to minimize these issues.  

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    Because the edge of a piece of metal absorbs heat faster than a solid surface, you need to modify your technique with the electrode. Whether you are using wire feed, stick or TIG welding, you need to move the electrode quickly and dance around the weld area, to avoid burn through. With the stick welding technique, this can be done using a stitch welder, which moves the electrode in and out like a sewing machine needle when you pull the trigger.

    When done properly, a butt joint should show bead on both sides of the metal. One way to help insure this is to clamp the 2 pieces with a uniform gap between them. The Eastwood Butt Weld Clamp and Backer Set holds sheet metal slightly apart for better weld penetration and also helps hold the work tight to prevent warpage from the heat. These clamps also help to prevent crawl, which occurs when the metal tries to move away from the heat of the work area.

    Even with clamps, the first step in a butt joint is to tack weld along the entire length of the joint. Start with a weld every few inches, at a uniform distance, then go back and fill in with more tack welds between the first set. Before moving on to the final bead you should have welds about an inch apart along the entire joint. Even with this technique, there will be some distortion that needs to be hammered out afterwards, but this will help minimize it.

     

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    Some welders prefer to use a weaving/zig zag or circular technique with thinner metals. This leaves you with a wider bead than you need, but it helps to spread out the heat of the weld to minimize burn through and warping. Before doing butt welds on something important, practice different angles with the electrode, rate of travel of your welding and length of your arc until you are comfortable with the thickness you need to weld, and establish your technique to avoid burning through it.

    How to weld a butt joint

    The picture above shows 4 different welds in cross section that you are likely to see when making TIG welded butt joints. Figure B shows correct technique, while examples A, C and D have various issues.

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    A: A common mistake beginners make is to pile too much bead on the top side of the joint, in an attempt to keep from burning through. This can be because the weld was not hot enough or more likely because the electrode was not close enough to the surface for proper penetration. For a butt joint to be acceptable, the bead should envelope both edges on both sides of the work, so no trace of the original edge can be seen.

     

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    B: This is an example of the correct penetration of a butt joint. There is bead showing on both sides of the work, with the lower bead being slightly smaller than the upper weld.

     

    butt weld c

    C: When you have too much penetration, the weld will begin to show undercutting and take this shape. You can see how the bead has begun to sag through the joint and not fill the top side fully. Undercutting is where the thickness of the weld is actually less than the work being welded, which means a weak joint.

     

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    D: This shows even more penetration and undercutting; the top bead has taken an almost concave shape. This is an even worse example than the one directly above.

     

    In addition to the common problems, there are also a few different ways you can prep the metal before it is welded.  The following only really applies when welding metal 1/8" or thicker because any thinner and you will almost always burn through.

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    The first and most common is known as a square butt weld.  This is done when two flat pieces are up against each other. this is used for thinner metals and TIG welding.  If welding metal thicker than 3/16" this method should not be used because the weld will not penetrate far enough into the metal and will not be as strong.

     

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    The next type of but joint is known as a bevel or double V joint. This type of weld is a must when welding metal 1/4" - 3/4".  When the edges of each piece are ground down it creates a valley or grove for the weld to sit in, this gives more surface area for the weld to bond the two panels.

     

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    The third type of butt joint is known as a double bevel or double 'V" and is the strongest type of butt joint.  This type of joint is used in areas where weld strength is critical.  This type of weld is usually used when welding metal thicker than 3/4" but can also be used on thinner metals if more strength is needed.

     

    It is true that the strength of welds when doing butt joints to body panels is not as critical as when doing structural repairs. However, properly welded butt joints will make the repair look better with less grinding and body filler. A well done joint will also last much longer, while a poorly done repair may crack and ruin the paint and body work after just a few miles of driving. Because of this, it’s important to practice and get the underlying repairs correctly done before moving on to the next phase. Learn the proper butt joint technique, and you will use it on countless welding jobs.

  • Repair Manuals Will Save Your Project

    If you plan on doing any type of serious work on your car or even just basic maintenance its a good idea to to buy a vehicle specific repair manual.  Depending on the car you drive it may be harder to find the exact manual, but for the most part a simple internet search will help you find the correct one for your car.  If you think buying one of these is not necessary you should probably reconsider.  The companies that produce these manuals have already done all the hard work for you.  These manuals usually have step by step instructions on how to take apart and reassemble every part of your vehicle, some even will show a full engine break down.

    Nova Manual

    Going in to a project blind can be fun because we all want to figure everything out for ourselves and not have any help along the way.  What happens if you hit a wall in the middle or forget how something goes back together? In this situation you only have a few options, even searching the internet may not help because you may already be over your head.

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    Having a repair manual will allow you to go into a project without any unknowns, some will even give tips on the exact way to remove the part so you don't break it.  I know first hand that my car would not be running today without the help of a repair manual.  If your vehicle requires special tools, a manual will not only tell you what tool you will need, but also give a part number which will make locating one easier.

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    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

  • How Air Compressors Work

    The concept behind the air compressor is a simple one and easily understandable to anyone who is into old cars and such. The reason the pump on the top of your compressor looks like a simplified motorcycle engine is because it basically is. The vast majority of compressors, from the tiny 12v tire inflator you stash in your trunk to the big 80 gallon shop unit, basically compress air with an air cooled piston engine. In fact, there are kits to turn air cooled VW bug motors into gas powered air compressors that could be mounted in the bed of a truck; two cylinders power it and two compress the air.

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    When the electric motor kicks in, the piston is drawn down the stroke of the cylinder. A simple spring-loaded one way valve opens allowing clean atmospheric air in, usually sucking thru some kind of air filter to keep out dirt and dust just like your car. The piston then moves up, compressing the air, and a 2nd valve opens to let the now pressurize air into the tank, or out into your tire in the case of a tire inflator or the one outside at the gas station. When a gauge signals that the tank has the correct pressure, the motor stops.

    Because air tools, spray guns and the like only allow the air out thru a restriction, the tank stays pressurized for a while. If an air hose were to break, the air would all come out pretty quick and return to atmospheric pressure in seconds. The CFM rating on a compressor indicates how many cubic feet of air per minute can leak out via the tool you are using before the pump would be unable to keep up with the demand at a given pressure.

    Multi-Stage and Screw Compressors

    There are variations on how air compressors work. There are multi stage reciprocating compressors, and nearly silent rotary screw compressors.

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    Two stage compressors typically have a v-twin looking head on top of the tank. The first cylinder works just like a single stage, but instead of feeding the tank, it feeds the intake on a second smaller cylinder, the second cylinder, then compresses it even more. There are also three piston versions that work the same way, as well as single stage multi-cylinder units for more air flow at lower pressures.

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    Rotary screw compressors work more like a Roots-type supercharger. Two rotors intermesh, forcing air into a smaller space along the length of the rotors, and finally out into the tank. Because of how they work, they produce more of a constant “whir” then the “chuga-chuga” of a reciprocating pump. This makes them popular for applications where noise is an issue. This type of compressor is also generally used in larger industrial application because of its increased efficiency and ability to deliver larger volumes of air at high pressure.

    Care and Maintenance

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    No matter how you compress the air, you have to deal with the physics of thermal dynamics and moisture. Squishing the air makes it hot, it’s an unavoidable by-product of compression, which is why some units have cooling fins on the supply line to the tank, or even a separate intercooler. All air has moisture in it too and compressing it results in condensation, which is why you need to drain the tank occasionally, and use an air dryer in applications like spraying paint. Just like an engine, compressors need to be lubricated, and if you are spraying paint, you need to strip the oil out of the airstream as well as the water. Luckily, most air dryers function this way already.

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