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Tag Archives: v8

  • Skip The Search And Get A Head Start On Your 1940 Ford Coupe Resto Project!

    Ready-to-assemble shell is made of high-strength steel, and is factory-rustproofed.

    The 1940 Ford Coupe has always been a popular car for restoration projects, ever since World War II veterans began turning them into hot rods by adding performance equipment to the car’s flathead V8 engine.

    But you no longer have to poke around in junkyards or barns looking for an original to work on. Now you can buy a brand new 1940 Coupe body directly from Ford!

    The 1940 Ford Coupe body is produced with today's high-strength steel, and is assembled using modern welding techniques. The new body comes rustproofed from the factory and is ready to be assembled as a custom hot rod or as a reproduction to the original.

    You can choose a stock firewall that accommodates the original flathead V8, but it can also be ordered with a recessed firewall to allow installation of much larger modern engines. Ford also supports it with a variety of model-correct mechanical and trim restoration parts; to see what's available for the 1940, click here.

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  • Now You Can Drive Your Dream "Hot Wheels®" Car

    In case there's any doubt...

    This says "Hot Wheels" to me!

    If you're in your forties or younger, there's a good chance you developed your interest in cool cars while playing with those little Hot Wheels® models. Now you can actually drive one in real life — an official, GM-produced, Chevrolet Camaro Hot Wheels® Edition!

    There have been more than 800 models and 11,000 variations of Hot Wheels® cars created since 1968, but the Chevrolet Camaro was chosen as the first full-size, production Hot Wheels® to be offered for sale, starting in early 2013.

    “Millions of us grew up playing with Hot Wheels,” said Chris Perry, vice president of Chevrolet Marketing. “Offering a special production model of the Camaro Hot Wheels is an opportunity to bring those memories to life.”

    The exterior of the Camaro Hot Wheels® Edition has that Hot Wheels® look you'll recognize, including a vibrant, graphics-accented metallic paint scheme and red-lined wheels that make it instantly recognizable as you tool down the road. And just in case someone comes up to admire your ride and doesn't quite know where they recognize it from, there's a Hot Wheels-style flame decal on each door and Hot Wheels® Edition sill plates.

    Felix Holst, vice president of creative for the Mattel Wheels Division said, “It’s been nearly 20 years since I started designing cars for Hot Wheels, and I have yet to drive one home!”

    Keep checking with your Chevy dealer early next year to see when the Hot Wheels® Edition will arrive. Just like collectible toys, once they're gone, they're gone!

    Watch a behind-the-scenes video about this cool Camaro Hot Wheels Edition here.

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  • We have a Brake Pedal and The Firewall Becomes Three Dimensional

    In the last update I was working on cutting out metal to make the firewall and mocking up my new brake pedal setup from Speedway. Since then I've been pretty busy making something from nothing. I had to initially tackle how I was going to mount the brake booster and pedal assembly under the cab. The first problem was that where the pedal bracket needed to live the S10 chassis started to pinch in and put the pedal on a weird angle. This kit was made for an earlier frame that's mostly straight/flat and like anything with a custom build, I had to get creative.

    I first used some jack stands to hold the brake assembly in place and eyeball up the position it needed to be in. I then traced out the area that the mounting pad for the pedal bracket needed to sit. I decided I could make a "cheese wedge" shaped mounting box that I could sink into the frame rail so that the pedal bracket would sit straight and everything would jive. I used 1/4" plate and copied the mounting holes to the base plate and welded the mounting bolts to the plate since they'd be hidden once the box was built. I used our Small Magnetic Welding Jig Set to square up the pieces and welded them together with the TIG200 DC Welder. The result was a strong mounting box I could sink into the frame and mount to the pedal box. I made my cuts in the chassis and mounted the box into the frame. Once I was sure it was square, I tack welded it into place with the MIG175 Welder.

    Now that I had the shiny Right Stuff Brake Parts mounted in place I dropped the air suspension and checked my clearance when aired out. The booster sits a couple inches below the chassis, but even when the body is sitting on the ground the booster has 4 inches or more of clearance. I'd probably rip the front end off before the brake parts were touched. That would be a BAD section of road even here on the east coast!

    My celebration of having a brake setup was cut short when I slide the Speedway brake pedal on and found that the brake pedal landed where my throttle pedal should be. I like to heel-toe my brake and throttle when driving.. but this was unacceptable! I decided to cut apart the brake pedal arm, shorten it, brace it and move the pedal over a few inches so that it sat where a brake pedal should. I also had to "clock" the mounting tab for the linkage under the pedal so that the pedal sits up high enough that it won't contact the chassis when I am pushing the pedal. I again used 1/4" steel plate and the TIG200 DC to box and brace the pedal to handle the force of pressing the brake pedal. Don't mind the rough floor in the photos, we just welded that in temporarily to keep the cab from flopping around while we worked on the roof chop and the firewall.

    With the brake parts mounted in place I could finally turn my attention back to the firewall and engine/transmission tunnel. I started by making the back side of the firewall setback. I used one of our Adjustable Profile Gauges to transfer the radius of the top of the TCI Auto Transmission to the panel. After tracing out my pattern I cut the rough shape out of 16 gauge steel with our Electric Metal Shears. Now the electric shears work really great for cutting laser straight lines and gentle curves, but when you need to make a tighter radius cut those shears are out of their element. I decided to mount up one of our Throatless Shears to make the cuts I needed. The nice thing about the "throatless" shear is that you can go as slow or fast as you want so that you can make some really clean, accurate cuts. I cut out the top curves to match the top panel I made on the english wheel, then cut the transmission tunnel radius and I had my second panel of the firewall made.

    Now with the back panel of the firewall channel made, I decided that I wanted to ditch the panel I made on the english wheel and form the panel out of one piece. I decided to use 18 gauge steel and form the piece using our Shrinker Stretcher Kit to make the panel match the radius of the main portion of the firewall we had made already. I cut a piece of 18 gauge a little longer than I needed and broke a 1/2" bend on each side of the panel. These edges will allow me to work them with the stretcher to get the radius I need on the panel. This panel was a little more difficult to make as I had to evenly stretch each side little by little as I went to get the shape the same on the entire panel. I actually went a little far when initially stretching the shape I needed and I had to work backwards with the shrinker in a few spots to get the panel back into shape to match the panel. That's the nice thing with metal is that you can always undo what you've done if you stretched or bent the metal a little too much. Once I got the shape close, I used the hammer and dolly to match the rolled edge we made earlier match with this new panel. Then I used Cleco Clamps to hold the pieces together.

    Now that I have the pieces in place I can start to see everything taking shape. I need to tackle making the wheel tubs for the front wheels and the transmission tunnel next. I'm hoping I'll be able to start melting all of this metal together with an Eastwood Welder shortly! Thanks for watching!

    -Matt/EW

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  • Project Resolution Becomes a Shell

    We've been VERY busy since our last update. We've decided that the best way to fix the body damage in the inner fender was to remove the 5.0 engine from the Mustang. As we dug in we found all sorts of holes drilled in that side of the engine bay from someone using a slide hammer to pull the dents and never filling the holes. This will be a great time to freshen up and paint the bay while we're "in there".

    Since we made the decision to pull the drivetrain out everyone has been arguing over what we should do when we put an engine back into the car. Some ideas we've heard range from mild to wild! We've heard supercharging, turbo, refresh and bring back to stock, a new crate engine, even a wild naturally aspirated engine build (big cam, port and polish, lightened and balanced internals, etc). We're still undecided, but I admit it would be good fun to see what sort of power we could get out of a cheap custom turbo setup on the stock 302 with Eastwood tools (give that TIG 200 a workout!). So we decided to do a compression test on all eight cylinders in case we keep the engine or use it as a base. Surprisingly all cylinders were pretty close and within spec. With the high being 145PSI and the low being 130PSI, this engine has faired better than many other fox body Mustangs out there!

    Now with those numbers recorded, Nick and I tore into the bay removing everything that needed to come off to remove the drivetrain. We're a little behind schedule, so we pulled out the Eastwood Air Tools to get the job done a little faster. We didn't run into that many rusty or seized bolts, but we were surprised that few we did run into, the Composite Twin Hammer Impact Wrench broke them loose with ease. With the use of the impact wrench and the Eastwood Composite Air Ratchet we have the engine hanging by only a few bolts. We're hoping later this week to try and pluck the lump out of the bay and drop it on the engine stand.

    While Nick and I worked on the engine bay Lisa, Amanda, Kevin, and Randy worked on getting the interior taken apart. This area was as dirty and abused as we expected, but Lisa did find a few surprises when she was removing the drivers seat. It turns out that someone had ripped or destroyed some of the seat mounting locations in the floor and made some pretty unsafe repairs. Under the right rear drivers seat bracket they had stripped out the mounting hole and drove a larger sized bolt into the floor pan at about a 45 degree angle. This was a pain to get out! Then she found that in the front someone had ripped out the front left mounting point of the drivers seat. To repair the area they used some painters tape (yes you read that correctly!) and a piece of aluminum plate they shoved into the hole to drive another incorrect bolt into. We're still unsure how they got the plate into the hole. but we imagine a BFH was in the mix!

    The crew got the interior pretty well stripped, the bumpers, rear quarter windows and sunroof removed so far and the car really is in shambles. Some may think the Mustang is ready for the junkyard but we see a fresh slate to start over and give this car a new lease on life. Next we hope to get the engine out and start to tackle the body damage. Repair panels are just starting to roll in from CJ Pony Parts and we can't wait to get these quality repair panels installed!

    If you have an idea what we should do for our new engine, please drop us a comment and let us know you're thoughts! Thanks for following, now get out there and build something yourself! -Matt/EW

    Related Eastwood Products:

    • Safety Goggles

      Protect your eyes from hazards from the front or sides; elastic strap

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  • GM announces 2014 Corvette Stingray- Better than the original?

    Automotive blogs have been buzzing this weekend after GM debuted the new 2014 Corvette Stingray at the Detroit Auto Show. This car has all the ingredients that Corvette fans have come to expect; great looks, effective aerodynamics, amazing handling, and a big engine. Designers have really outdone themselves this time with an edgy look that has hints of Italian sports car styling to it.

    2014 Corvette Stingray

    2014 Corvette Stingray

    This new model dons the iconic "Stingray" title that was first introduced in 1963. The original Stingrays have now become one of the most sought after Corvettes in the collector car and restoration world. We're a bit biased, but when we heard the Stingray name was brought back we were a bit skeptical. How much could a modern sports car have in common with the original from the 60's? After seeing the shot of the back end of the car, my tune was changed a little. It doesn't have the iconic split back window that makes them so sought after, but it does have a similar look if you squint your eyes just right. We can definitely see that GM designers had some old photos of a split window Stingray in front of them when doing their initial sketches, but it's hard to modernize an iconic classic.

    1963 Corvette Stingray

    The base model engine in the new C7 Corvettes boast the largest to ever come standard in a Corvette; a 6.2L Small Block Chevy V8 producing 450 Horsepower and 450 Torque. Corvette fans can always count on a big engine and lots of power..well sometimes. What we mean is, GM has now made cylinder deactivation standard on ALL Corvette models (including the manual transmission!). Now when you're cruising at low engine loads it will drop out 4 of the 8 cylinders. This is great for fuel economy (26-MPG highway), but bad for anyone that wants the growl of a V8 at all times. GM has even come up with a multi-valve exhaust system to tame the noise even further during four cylinder cruising. We know that MPG rules the new car market, but we didn't think it would start hitting the sports car world! I can't wait for the automotive tuning world to get ahold of the new Stingray and give owners the option to leave the exhaust open at all times and run with full power when they want!

    2014 Corvette Exhaust

    Did you miss the reveal and want to see what all the hype is about? Check out the virtual debut on the Chevrolet website here: http://www.chevrolet.com/new-2014-corvette/

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