Tag Archives: versa bend

  • Sheet Metal Fabrication: Basic Machines & Techniques

    Sheet metal fabrication is the act of forming, shaping, and joining metal together to build and or repair a tangible part. There are many techniques and tools. It’s been done since the beginning of time when even the simplest tools were used. In this article we will share the most common and important tools, machines, and techniques for the DIY fabricator.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Wiring and Fabricating a Fuse Box Mount

    One of the biggest hurdles of converting Project Pile House from “garage art” to an actual running, driving vehicle is putting some wiring into the vehicle. I’m running a carbureted small block Cheverolet V8 (SBC) so there is little to make the truck run and move under its own power, but some wiring is needed to make it street legal.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Early Summer Project Pile House Update.

    With the floor pans made up I decided to move outwards and tackle the rust in the door openings. The truck door sill on the drivers side was rotted away and the front of the door opening/jamb was rotted pretty bad. In fact the lower portion was almost non existent.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How to repair rust- Fixing a rusty windshield cowl

    So you decided to give your car a refreshing new look and it's time to strip it down to prepare the car for paint. You can count on finding some sort of surprise when tearing the vehicle down. Whether it's hidden accident damage, previous repairs, or the mummy of a dead animal; it's always an adventure when stripping a car or truck down for paint or bodywork.

    I recently started tearing into my "clean" (for the east coast at least!) 1977 VW Scirocco I've owned for a few years. It had some wear and tear and some bubbling paint I wanted to address before it got a fresh lick of paint. When I began removing the fenders I was pretty surprised to find some rot in the inner fender and windshield cowl. I decided to take some photos as I repaired this area and share some tips for making a repair that will look original when done.

    Here is the offending area when I removed the fender. The worst rot was in an area that sandwiched between the fender and cowl and was covered with weather stripping. So from first glance it just looked like some bubbled paint, but that was the tip of the iceberg.

    I first cut out the area that was rotted until I got to solid metal and a nice seam where I could weld and blend the panel into the original metal.

    I started making my patch panel by bending up a piece of construction paper to the rough size I needed, then I transferred the rough shape over and cut it out of 20 gauge aluminized steel. Next I measured the other side and marked out the bend line I needed to make.

    In order to make a clean bend in the new metal I needed a metal brake. I decided to use the Versa Bend Sheet Metal Brake and put a crisp 90 degree bend in the panel on my line.

    With the patch panel now formed into the rough size I needed, I took it to the car and trimmed it to fit the opening. It's here that you want to make sure the patch panel fits tightly so that you don't need any excessive welding to fill voids.

    I then setup the MIG 135 with .023 Solid Core MIG Wire so I could lay small, flat spot welds on the patch panel. Setting the machine up on a similar piece of scrap metal helped me get my spot welds laying flat and penetrating correctly. After finessing the panel with Eastwood Hammers and Dollies and blending the welds with a flap disc on an angle grinder I was satisfied with the repair. I'm happy to say the patch panel looks close to original and the repair should be invisible once it has primer and a top coat on it. Now onto the next surprise!

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  • A Visit from Rolling History- The Keystone Cops Model T Car Club Visits Eastwood

    Like the saying "birds of the same feather flock together", automotive enthusiasts with similar tastes and interests normally cruise and meet together. This is especially true with fans of Ford Model T's. Recently we got a call from the local Ford Model T car club who wanted to stop in for a visit at the Eastwood headquarters; we happily agreed. The Keystone Cops Model T Car Club is a group of enthusiasts that enjoy all aspects of Model T's in "original" form. You won't see chopped, channeled, or modified caricatures of the original here, these enthusiasts are out enjoying their cars as they were built originally.

    This past Thursday the group set out on their annual 3-day cruise through local rural scenic roads. They made their first stop at the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles and then continued on a few short miles to visit us here at Eastwood. As the cars rolled in and parked, we were taken back to a time when cars were mechanical works of art rather than digitized, rolling toasters we see on the road today. The brass, the wood, and the simplicity stops almost anyone in their tracks, and we can definitely admit that many of us disappeared from our desks while they were here!

    After everyone parked, snapped some pictures, and said hello, we gave the first of 2 excited groups a tour of the inner workings of Eastwood, and gave them a bit of history. After the tours we rounded the building to give them a short tech demo on our new Eastwood Metal Brake and Slip Roll, and closed the tour with "goodie" bags for the visitors.

    All in all the visit was great for everyone involved and we were delighted to see so much automotive history in one place! Click the pictures in our gallery below to view the larger versions. Thanks for reading!

    -Matt/EW

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