Tag Archives: vintage

  • How to Repair & Remove Scratches in Glass

    Owning a vehicle means experiencing scratches and dings on glass surfaces. Although excessively deep scratches in glass should not be handled with a DIY kit, as attempting this may cause optical distortion in the glass, most scratches can be removed and repaired using a surface scratch removal kit. In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to repair glass scratches using  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How To Remove, Treat, and Prevent Rust

    Rust is something we all must deal with at some point in our lives. Whether it’s maintaining your daily driver, restoring a classic, or just around the house, rust is a type of corrosion that never sleeps and is always attacking metal. Below are the common ways to prevent, remove and stop rust in its tracks.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Packard Institute restoring old car to restore lost souls

    Raynard Packard in driver's seat of the 1948 Packard Victoria Convertible being restored at the Packard Institute. (Photo courtesy Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal)

    A recent Akron Beacon Journal article showed us how automotive restoration projects can be a bridge to a more productive life for troubled youngsters.

    In some ways, the 1948 Packard Victoria Convertible is a metaphor for the kids who will be restoring it: a treasure hiding beneath the visible dings and dents of a hard life.

    But as with all the various “therapies” used with at-risk teens at the Packard Institute near Akron, turning the hunter green auto that’s currently missing its ragtop into a shimmering silver head-turner will teach them about the power of second chances.

    Packard Institute, a Highland Square-based nonprofit that works mostly with young people struggling with substance abuse, took possession of the car with the intention of making it the “flagship” of the organization. The institute’s founder, Raynard Packard, is a distant cousin to James and William Packard, who founded Packard Automobiles in Warren, Ohio in 1899, “so it’s only fitting,” he said.

    “About three years ago, we started getting these antique automobiles,” Packard said. “It’s a lot of fun, and the kids learn a skill set, but it’s really about building relationships. The car is a fun by-product of the relationships.”

    Among the volunteers who have worked with the youngsters is Greg Delagrange, a Barberton, Ohio car restorer and Packard auto expert. “Greg has given $50,000 worth of hours with these kids,” Packard said.

    “Some of these kids come from homes, let’s just say they aren’t the Cleavers,” Delagrange said, referencing the "Leave It to Beaver" sitcom from the ’50s and ’60s. “Sometimes I think they’re like this car: They get dumped and abandoned.” Others have attentive parents, but end up turning to drugs for a variety of reasons.

    For more of the story, please read the complete article here.

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  • Early Summer Project Pile House Update.

    With the floor pans made up I decided to move outwards and tackle the rust in the door openings. The truck door sill on the drivers side was rotted away and the front of the door opening/jamb was rotted pretty bad. In fact the lower portion was almost non existent.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Preventative Maintenance on Mirror Polished Parts for your Ride

    Everyone loves a well done vehicle with some nice polished parts on it. It really makes things pop and gives your car, truck, or bike a classy look. While it does look amazing, it takes a LOT of hard work to keep mirror polished metal parts looking as good as the day you installed them. I've been building and restoring classic race wheels for some time now and I've found that the best solution to keeping the mirror polished lips looking perfect is to periodically apply some Eastwood Metal Protect. Our R&D team worked hard to make a coating that is semi-permanent, self leveling, and nearly invisible once dry. I recently did a set of polished aluminum wheel lips for some Ronal Racing wheels that I had painted with our Eastwood Vintage Race Wheel Paint and I decided to shot a couple photos. You can see in the pictures that even when you're very close, the coating is nearly invisible. Metal Protect allows me to just spray the wheels down with some detailer or when washing the car and they'll look as good as the day they were polished. No need to hand rub them all the time! Save yourself some time and apply Metal Protect to all of your polished parts!

    -Matt/EW

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