Tag Archives: weld

    • Tech Tip- How to easily fill body seams with TIG Rod and a MIG Welder

      One thing I like about building a true custom (not just bolting on shiny wheels and putting stickers on the windows) is that there are no rules. It's all about what looks good and what fits your vision of the final product that is YOUR project. One theme that I have with Project Pile House is to make the body less "busy" and give it a smoother overall appearance. These trucks were meant to be utility vehicles, so there wasn't much thought put into styling. Definitely not like their passenger car counterparts. All that anyone really cared about was that it was reliable, could haul a lot in the bed, and that the hood, doors, and tailgate closed and latched. So this means I need to fill and smooth a lot of body seams or body lines that are all over the cab and front end.

      These seams need to be filled with metal, and should not be filled with body filler, no matter how tempting it is to just run a bead of filler along them. Occasionally you can get away with filling a seam by slowly stitch welding it shut, but this could require a few passes to completely fill the seam and it puts unnecessary heat into the panels around it. I've found that these seams can be easily filled by using TIG filler rod and a MIG welder. This tech tip should help you fill body seams quickly.

      You want to start by removing any paint or rust around the seam, and then run a wire wheel in the groove to remove anything tucked into tight crevices. I found an angle grinder with a flap disc takes care of most of the process, but a thin wire wheel cleans out any remaining debris. If you're the overly cautious type you can spray some Self Etching Weld Thru Primer in the seam to help seal the area.

      After you're down to clean metal, you'll want to find a TIG filler rod that will fill the seam and sit flush, or just below, the surface. You then want to set your MIG welder to a higher voltage or heat setting than normal for the metal you're welding. The idea is to produce a quick, hot spot weld that melts the filler rod into the seam and leaves a fairly flat weld on top of the panel. The flatter the final weld is, the less grinding will be required.

      After you have a few spot welds holding the filler rod in place, you can then stitch weld the rod into the seam. Always remember to alternate your spot welds and allow the panel too cool in between welds. The seam should look something like below after it's completely welded.

      With the seam filled, you can take a flap disc or low grit sanding disc and knock the "proud" welds down until they blend into the surrounding metal. You should be left with a seam that's filled with metal (and not filler!) and will require little bodywork when it comes time for paint.

      -Matt/EW

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    • Eastwood Two Time Popular Mechanics Editors Choice Award at SEMA 2012

      Winning a new product award at SEMA is pretty exciting and every company at the SEMA show is eager to receive any type of recognition for their new products. Here at Eastwood we work every day to try and get you new innovative products you can actually use.

      This year at the 2012 SEMA show one of our items in the new product showcase was picked for an Editors Choice Award by Popular Mechanics Magazine once again. You may remember last year our Aerosol Injection won an award. This year our product designer Mark R accepted the 2012 award for our MIG Spot Weld Kit.

      Eastwood MIG Spot Weld Kit

      Mark and our R&D crew developed this product just like many of our products; he found a problem while working on his own restoration project and designed an affordable solution. Now you can save money and space by keeping the MIG spot weld kit on your welding cart. Just thread it onto your MIG gun when you want to use it without having to drag out another tool.

      We're honored to win the award two years in a row, and while many product designers would be feeling the pressure to go for a three-peat; we're just doing the same we've been doing for years.. bringing you affordable, innovative products to solve problems in the shop.

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    • Chopping The Top On A 1950 Dodge Pick-Up – Eastwood’s Project Pile House- Part 3

      In the last posts we had quite a mess, the roof was in numerous pieces, A-pillars didn't line up, doors were in pieces, etc, etc. Fast forward a bit and the roof is one piece again. I decided to use the TIG 200 to weld the seam back up. I jumped around the panel laying short, low amperage TIG welds with some silver/bronze filler wire. This filler wire melts at a very low temperature and also is a bit softer making it easier to hammer and grind flat. Check out the video at the end of the article for the full step-by-step process.

      We still have years worth of body damage to address on the roof that is quite an eyesore with the roof at eye level now. But before we begin smoothing welds and banging out old dents, we need to rebuild the door frames so that we have the doors back in one piece. I built the drivers side door frame yesterday and we'll be filming the passenger side to give you an idea of the basic process to modify and reattach them. Stay tuned and thanks for following the project!

      -Matt/EW

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