Tag Archives: Welding

  • Hands On Cars Ep. 4 - Replacing a Rusty Roof

    In this episode Kevin is all about undoing the errors of some previous owner of the Zed Sled Camaro Z28. He finishes up with the rust replacement on the bottom of the car, and tackles the cause of all the rot in the first place: A leaking aftermarket sunroof installation.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Upgrading your forced induction system- Installing V-Band Clamps

    Evolution is the way of the world in all aspects and your car projects will evolve as you tinker with them or build new projects. Turbo charging or supercharging an engine is fairly simple and can be done inexpensively, but there's a few places where skimping can cause headaches. Leaking boost flex hoses and clamps are the bane of existence with many DIY turbo setups. A good way to correct this issue is by replacing the silicone or rubber hose connections with V-Band clamps.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • TIG Welding FAQ

    TIG stands for Tungsten Inert Gas. Unlike MIG or ARC welding, TIG uses an electrode separate from the filler material. This electrode is called the tungsten, and different varieties of them have different welding characteristics. The inert gas is typically Argon, or sometimes Helium or a mixture.   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • How Do I Adjust the Flow Rate of Shielding Gas?

    Whenever you are using a welding machine, like a MIG welder or a TIG welder, it is crucial that you know how to adjust the flow rate of shielding gas. When assembling and setting up your welder, once you connect your shielding gas regulator, the gas flow rate must be adjusted in order to assure that the right amount of shielding gas is flowing over your weld. If too little gas is flowing from your welder, excessive spatter and contamination can occur. If too much gas is flowing, you will be wasting your gas, which can negatively affect the result of your weld. Typically, there are two gauges on the shielding gas regulator, one to mark the gas flow rate and one to mark the gas tank pressure.

    The first thing to do to adjust the flow rate of your shielding gas is open your shielding gas tank valve the whole way. Adjust the knob on the regulator so that it is marked at about 30 CFH. Now, turn on the welder and trigger the torch switch so that the gas will start to flow. When you trigger the torch switch, the gas flow should cause the needle on the gas flow gauge to descend to a steady and accurate reading. Next, the gas flow should be set to about 20 CFH when it is flowing, which is the most common flow rate used when welding. Sometimes this needs to be readjusted as a slight breeze could alter the flow and weaken the shielding gas consistency surrounding the weld. Once you have adjusted the flow rate, you are free to weld. Just remember to close the gas valve on the bottle when you are finished welding.

    To learn more about welding and for more automotive FAQs, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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  • MIG Welding Duty Cycles

    When you are using an arc welding machine, you will need to understand what its duty cycle is as it will help you preserve the life and quality of your tool. On this page, you will learn about what a duty cycle is and how it is relevant to MIG welders, specifically.

    The MIG Welding Duty Cycle

    When you purchase a MIG welder, you will notice a specification on the packaging or in the manual called the duty cycle. This refers to the amount of welding that can be achieved in a given amount of time. The reason this specification is important is it informs the user of how long the MIG welder can work at its optimum level, since MIG welders, or any other welders, do not perform continuously as opposed to some other automotive tools that do.

    A perfect example of a duty cycle can be found in the Eastwood MIG 175 Amp Welder. The MIG 175 has a rated duty cycle of 30% at 130 amps. This means that the power signal of the MIG 175 should remain on for 30% of the time and off 70% of the time at 130 amps of power. If you look at your welding time in increments of 10 minutes, the duty cycle is a percentage of that 10 minute increment. In other words, with a 30% duty cycle at 130 amps, you can weld for three solid minutes and should let the welder cool off for seven minutes. You can increase the duty cycle percentage by turning down the amperage output, but going above the amp output (in this case, 130 amps) will yield a lower duty cycle. If you exceed the duty cycle and the breaker is tripped, allow the MIG welder to cool down for at least 15 minutes. A rated duty cycle on any MIG welding machine is there to protect you and your welder from any long-lasting damage.

    To learn more about MIG welding and for more automotive articles, be sure to visit Eastwood.com.

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