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Tag Archives: Welding

  • Cloning isn't an option? The Best Ways to Gain an Extra Set of Hands When Working Alone.

    I don't know about you, but I work alone A LOT and I always seem to need an extra set of hands to hold things together, down, out of the way, etc when working on my projects. It seems like whenever I need an extra set of hands my friends aren't around and the significant other is no where to be found and I'm stuck trying to hold a piece together with my knee and elbow to tack weld. Over the years I've gathered a bunch of items that make working alone a little easier and I decided to put them together in a list for you. Feel free to share your favorites in the comments!
  • Get Comfortable and Step Up Your TIG Game

    Step up your TIG game and take your machine to the next level, enabling you to perform stronger and better looking welds. Regardless of the capabilities of the machine that you have, if you are looking to lay down the same great looking welds over and over, you have to be comfortable in your welding position. It's good practice to take your time to get into a comfortable position and take a dry run before you start an arc. This will tell you whether your position will enable you to complete your weld from end to end without stopping and starting.
  • Tips to Making Custom Floor Pans for your Car

    Mark recently decided to take on a resto-mod oddball in a Chevy Corvair. This neglected Chevy bastard-child was rescued from a local scrap yard and had seen some questionable repairs and better days. His first step in the rebuild of the car was getting the structure of the car rebuilt and solid before he started customizing the car. The first area of concern was the floor; or lack of it.
  • How to fabricate and install Heavy Duty Threaded Inserts

    Recently when channeling my Ford Model A I wanted to use Grade 8 fasteners for all of the body mounts instead of just tapping threads into the frame or inserting rivnuts that could fail over time. First of all the 1/4" wall of the tubing wasn't really thick enough to give sufficient threads to hold the weight and twist of the body from normal driving. We came up with a slick solution and figured we'd share.

    I started by threading a batch of Grade 8 nuts onto a carriage bolt and locking them all together.

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    I then mounted the bolt into the lathe and cut off the hex portion of each nut leaving us with perfectly round grade 8 threaded inserts. The nuts were cut down just a hair bigger than 1/2" so they would be a press fit into a 1/2" drilled hole.

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    I then counter sunk each hole and threaded a bolt into each insert so I could adjust them so they were straight in the holes. I used the TIG 200 to carefully lay a weld puddle on the edge of the threaded insert melting it to the frame. You must take your time here and be very precise because a rogue dab of filler rod could go over the edge of the threaded insert and make your life hell when it comes time to thread a bolt back into the insert!

     

     

     

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    Hopefully you can use this method to put some clean, strong threaded inserts in your next project.

    -Matt/EW

  • Complex Rust Patch Panel Made Easy

    At times rust repair can be ultra simple; cut the old rust out, cut a square of fresh metal and weld it in. But those repairs aren't usually as frequent as we'd like. Rust seems to like to creep into a curved area or into a body line that takes more care to repair. I recently decided to tackle a large rusty area of the rear portion of the floor on Project Pile House.

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