ESI processing not enabled ESI processing not enabled
ESI processing not enabled

Tag Archives: Welding

  • DIY Removable Exhaust Hangers

    Adding a new exhaust system to your ride but don't want to use the cheap parts store hangers and clamps?

    Lets face it we all know how horrible they are,  aside from just looking tacky, they almost never last.  The U-bolt clamps are just as bad, you better hope you have them exactly where you want them because chances are, once you tighten them down they are sure to be rusted shut in a few weeks.

    DSC05037

    Here is a way to make your own custom exhaust hanger using one of those cheapo parts store hangers.  Its simple, cheap, and even allows the whole system to be easily removed.

     

    What You'll Need:

    - Universal Exhaust Hanger with an open, pivoting end. (It must be this style, you'll see why later)

    P1030219

    - 1.25 " X 1.25" piece of 1/8" steel

    - 5/16" or 3/8" Thread bolt about 1" long, lock washer, and hex nut.

    - High Temp Paint (to prevent rust)

    p39628

     

     Process:

    P1030224

    First you will need to cut the end of the exhaust hanger, with a Cut off Wheel, along the line drawn. This piece can be thrown out.

     

    P1030225

    After the end is cut off you will be left with a tab sticking straight down.

     

    P1030233

    Clamp the square tab to the hanger with enough room to drill a hole big enough for the bolt you are using, in my case it was a 3/8" hole.  Mark the center of where you want the hole to be and use a Center Punch to indent the metal so the drill bit doesn't wander.

     

    P1030235

    With the two pieces clamped, use a Step Bit to drill a through both pieces so the hole will remain in line.  Pass the bolt through and tighten by hand so the tab remains square. Step bits make easy work of drilling large diameter holes, an essential tool when doing any type of metal fabrication.

     

    P1030244

    Using jack stands or wire position your muffler or exhaust pipe in the location you want it to sit under the car.  It is a good idea to determine where you want to mount the hanger to the body or frame of the car first, to insure the hanger is long enough to reach the pipe. (As an example I am using a piece of exhaust tube on a work bench and the hanger suspended from a piece of metal in a vice)

     

    P1030246

    With the hanger mounted under the car, align your exhaust pipe exactly where you want it to hang.

     

    P1030250

    Tack weld the tab to the exhaust pipe or muffler.  Remove the supports holding up the exhaust and check the positioning.

     

    P1030255

    If is where you want it, finish the weld along the tab. Allow the metal to cool off before unbolting the hanger.

     

    P1030258

    Once it is cool to the touch, remove the bolt.  Creating this custom exhaust hanger will cost about the same as using those tacky U-Bolts, and it makes exhaust removal a breeze.  All that is left to do is a quick coat of High Temp Exhaust Paint and you'll have a simple rust free solution to mounting your exhaust system.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

  • If You're Welding an Auto Darkening Helmet is NEEDED!

    The key to good welding is being able to see the metal.  Ditch those old standard lens helmets and get yourself an Auto-Darkening Helmet. You'll see light!, but not too much.  I remember when I learned to weld all I had was an old ARC welding helmet which was like trying to see through a black piece of paper.   The only time I was able to see what I was doing was after the arc was started but at that point it was too late if the weld was not in the right place.

    old helmet

    Auto-Darkening helmets are not new technology but many people are unaware of the benefits of using one.  Almost all welders on the market today come with a small fixed lens mask but thats only to get you started in case you don't already have an auto-darkening helmet.

    These masks are great because they only go dark when you are welding, as soon as the arc stops the lens isn't any darker than a pair of sunglasses.  Many of you know the struggle of having to constantly flip your mask up after every weld just to make sure its right.  Now you wont have to even touch the mask keeping your hands free to continue working.  An Auto-Darkening helmet also gives you the ability to adjust the level of lens shade.  This feature comes in handy if you do multiple types of welding since each requires a different level of shade to protect your eyes.

     

    comparison

     

    Would you believe that both of these pictures were taken under the same conditions.  On the left is a view through a standard fixed lens helmet.  All you can see is the faint outlines of the LED Work Light.  Imagine trying to see where to weld once your mask is on.  The view through an Auto-Darkening Helmet (right) is clear and bright, you can even read the side of the Eastwood MIG 250 on the other side of the bench.  Once your helmet is down rarely will you need to take it off in order to make small adjustments or to change position.

     

    P1020520

    You wont even need to take it off to change the settings on your welder.  Making current and wire speed adjustments just became so much easier and far less time consuming.  If you've ever used and Auto-Darkening Helmet its near impossible to weld again without one.

    Eastwood offers three different Auto Darkening Helmets that will bring your welding to a whole new level.  For a beginner welder these are a must have, you will find yourself making perfect welds in no time.  Click the pictures below to find out more info on each of Eastwood's Helmets

    Auto-Darkening Helmet

    auto dark

     

    Large View Auto-Darkening Helmet

    large auto dark

     

    Extra Large View Auto-Darkening Helmet

    extra large auto dark

     

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

  • How to Convert your TIG Torch to a Gas Lens

    In the quest of perfectly colored stacks of dime TIG welds there are a few ways you can give yourself an advantage. One of them is to get optimal gas coverage and the ability to see the weld puddle better.
  • How to Prep Metal For Welding - Quick Tip

    DIRTY WELDS ARE NEVER STRONG, CLEAN YOUR METAL BEFORE WELDING

    The key to any good weld is clean metal, but what is the best way to clean metal before you start welding? Depending on the tools you have and the overall goal of the project there are a few ways to prep your metal to get a nice clean weld every time.

    The best welds come from pure clean metal to metal contact,  any foreign materials in the welding area can cause welding imperfections.  Even brand new metal must be prepped before it can be welded because there is usually a coating put on new metal so it does not rust or oxidize during the shipping process.  This is a factor that is often overlooked and will always result in a weak and ugly weld.  Be mindful, once you remove this coating the metal is exposed to the elements,  if left out unprotected steel will begin to rust, even indoors.

    To start, the type of welding you are doing will determine how you prep the metal. Inherently MIG welding steel does not need the metal to be perfectly clean. On the other extreme, TIG welding aluminum requires contaminant free metal to create a strong clean weld.  In all of the examples below you can see the difference the dull color of the "new metal" (left) compared to how it looks after it is properly prepped (right).

    P1020492

    Angle Grinder with Flap Disc

    Using an angle grinder with a flap disc works great to prep steel for MIG or TIG welding.  Mild steel does not require the surface to be super clean to get a good weld.  In the picture above you can see the left side is brand new untouched steel, it may look clean but it has a thin coating like stated earlier.  Once you remove the coating with the flap disc, all it takes is a quick wipe down with Low VOC PRE or Acetone and you will be able to make clean and effective welds. This method works great for heavy welding on chassis parts, this area is always exposed to the elements which will build up contamination over time.  Take the time and clean the metal, you'll thank yourself later.

    Be careful a flap disc will remove a lot of material so don't use this on thin sheet metal, it may compromise the metals strength.

     

    P1020483

    Sand Paper

    Similar to using a grinder this method will work great for MIG and TIG welding steel or stainless, but it can be time consuming and does not always remove all of the coatings. Like using a grinder, you must wipe the metal down with Low VOC PRE or Acetone before welding.  In the picture above I used 80 Grit sandpaper,  it worked well by removing the coating but also left deep scratches that may not look good.

     

    P1020493

    Abrasive blasting

    If the metal you will be welding is very rusty and is not suitable to be sanded or removed with a grinder another option to prep the metal is to blast it.  After blasting the metal may look clean but it will still need to be wiped down with Low VOC PRE or acetone to remove and chemical contaminants.  The abrasive material can sometimes trap pieces of other metals that can cause the metal you are welding to rust or corrode.  Never rely on a blaster to prep aluminum for welding, it is very sensitive to contaminants that can get trapped even after wiping it down.

     

    P1020496

    Cleaning for aluminum TIG Welding

    When prepping aluminum there is a slightly different process that you will need to be mindful of.  Aluminum is very susceptible to contaminants therefore the cleaning process must be done in reverse to produce clean welds.

    First you must wipe down the metal with Low VOC PRE or acetone, this will remove any oils or grease on the surface.  The next step is to remove any oxides on the surface of the metal.  To do this use stainless steel wool or a stainless wire brush on the area to be welded.  Make sure that the Steel wool or wire brush is used exclusively for aluminum to avoid contaminants from other metals.  Once these tools come in contact with mild steel they can transfer steel bits into the aluminum which will eventually create rust.  Finally wipe down the metal with Low VOC PRE or acetone with a clean cloth or rag, from here you are ready to weld.

     

    It doesn't matter what kind of welding you are doing its always important to take the time to clean your metal before welding.  Not only will your welds look amazing they will be a lot stronger which is always an added bonus.

     

    Check out the Eastwood Blog and Tech Archive for more How-To's, Tips and Tricks to help you with all your automotive projects.  If you have a recommendation for future articles or have a project you want explained don't hesitate to leave a comment.

    - James R/EW

     

  • Quick Project- Portable MIG Welder Torch Holder

    It never fails when you're using your MIG welder, you set the torch down to adjust, hammer, or to lift your helmet and you can't find a good spot to hang your torch. Worse yet, the hot tip of the welding wire pokes you in the leg and burns you when you go to set it in your lap. I'm always looking for ways to consolidate my tools and make myself more efficient. I decided to make this quick little MIG Torch holder that fits on my magnetic ground post. Great beginner fabrication project!

Items 11 to 15 of 80 total

ESI processing not enabled