Tag Archives: wheels

  • Tips to save time when Powder Coating Harley Wheels

    These wheels originally were polished aluminum factory wheels on a Harley and after a years of daily-riding the wheels had some pretty heavy corrosion and baked-on brake dust. The first step was to disassemble the wheels completely (remove tires, all bearings, grease, seals, etc) and media blast them until we were left with clean, virgin aluminum.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Eastwood Basics to Metal Buffing Tech Demo Q&A Answers

    We recently held a live tech demo on the basics to buffing metal. I gave some insight on the basics, tips, tricks, and safety when buffing. We had a great response for the Q&A and ran out of time to answer all of the questions. I wanted to answer all questions we missed live, so below are the answers for any we missed. Thanks for watching and drop us a line if you have an idea for another live tech demo! -Matt/EW

    Datest41- How do you take pits out of chrome plated pot metal?

    worker9270- How d you take pits out of chrome?

    We had a lot of questions about this. The short answer to this is that you can't remove pits or rust or major imperfections in chrome. Chrome is a coating and much like paint once the rust or pitting is coming up from under the coating it can't be fixed without removing the coating and treating the surface. Minor spotting can be polished out of chrome, but major defects like pits, rust, flaking, etc can not be fixed with out stripping and chroming the part again.

    alanbarclay73- Any tips for cleaning and protecting a rusty cast exhaust manifold?

    The best way to clean a rusty cast manifold is to media blast it, then apply one of our exhaust manifold paints

    swayman007- Can you use any of these to polish out scratches in glass?

    The blue "plastic" compound may help with some hazing, but scratches (especially if you can feel them with your fingernail) are tough to get out of glass. Our Pro Glass Polishing Kit for Deep Scratches will be the best bet in that situation.

    xplodee- Do you ever cheat on super soft metals by starting with emory compound rather than sanding?

    I'd be a liar if I said I haven't! The only thing you have to be careful with is that it is easy to take too much material away when using the buff motor and a heavier compound or more aggressive buff wheel than suggested for that metal. Just be VERY careful when doing that and check your progress often.

    wildfire02- Wouldn't it be better to polish really small parts in a vibratory polisher?

    A vibratory polisher or tumbler works GREAT for small parts, but admittedly it does take quite a long time to get parts mirror polished with a tumbler. If you have a big pile of small parts to polish, I'd definitely say use the tumbler, but if you just have a handful or just a couple small items, it might be quicker/easier to use a buff wheel. It really depends on the situation.

    swayman007- Can you use these wheels on a polisher sander for like polishing diamond plate?

    It could be possible, but you have to make sure that the buff wheels can safely mount to your polisher and that the polisher rotates at the correct RPM range.

    Datest41- What sort of wheel is used for step 1, 2, 3 and step 4?

    I covered that in the video, but it's also laid out in a chart in a tech article on or site here: HERE

    mimiof6- Does is matter what rpm the motor is?

    It depends on what you're buffing and the size of the wheel and motor you're using. We recommend 3600 for most metals (lower is acceptable for plated parts and softer metals) and 1800 for plastics with a 10" buff wheel.

    kennyredman- How often do you use a sisal wheel- would it have been appropriate on that rough sandcast?

    The sisal wheel is used for heavy cutting and smoothing metal. It works well for smoothing rough metal when coupled with our greaseless compounds.

    xplodee- the brass parts i polish are antique fans sitting inside?

    It depends on the conditions they are exposed to, but we guarantee at least 3 months, but probably longer if they're inside a climate controlled situation.

    wildfire02- do you have to change wheels with different compounds because of contamination or not mix?

    It's a best practice because it is difficult to get ALL of the traces of old compound off of the wheel and it could be counter-active to the polishing procedure.

    dreamboat77- don't you mean white compound? Rouge is red?

    The white compound is referred to as "White Rouge" throughout the industry. Not sure who started that or why, but there is white AND red rogue compound. Red is generally the final coloring compound and a bit more delicate than the white rouge.

    Datest41- what color is step 2?!?

    It depends on the material that you're buffing or polishing. We have a good breakdown of the steps in the tech article on our site. You can see that here: Here

    swayman007- how do you determine what size wheels to use 6", 8", or 10"?

    It depends on the buff motor that you're using. Check your motor for details on which is best. We have a chart in our buffing tech article on the site. You can see it Here.

    xplodee- What does everyone do to collect the dust from their buffer?

    One idea I didn't hit on during the live feed was that you could let a shop vac run during the buffing process to pick up the dust thrown by the wheel. It isn't as good as a air filtration system, but it is a similar concept.

    JorgeCardoso- I want to see how to work with the expander wheel, do you have any video?

    We do not currently have a video on using the expander wheel. We'll work on getting one put up ASAP!

    bamadio- You sell a 2 speed buffer motor. In what situations do you use each speed?

    The higher speed is used for metal and the lower speed is normally used for plastics and delicate metals or plated parts.

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  • Winfield Chop Shop Tour Houston, TX - Part 2

    After the seam was welded, Gene and the crew went ahead and made a new panel for the one rear corner to make it all fit seamlessly. He used Eastwood Plastic Metal Shaping Hammers and Sandbag to form the panel and get the rough shape that was needed to fit the roof.  Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • Eastwood tools to be used in Gene Winfield Chop Shop Tour- Stop 1 Houston, TX Autorama

    This year at SEMA 2012 we were running around shooting some of our favorite show vehicles of the week. I happened to run into Gene Winfield as he was debuting his 2nd rendition of his custom Ford he calls the "Pacifica". We did a nice interview with Gene (check it out below!) to find out about the truck and also hear about what he's up to in the future. He told us about an exciting tour he was starting shortly after SEMA with Championship Auto Shows called the "Gene Winfield Chop Shop".   Click Here To Read Full Post...
  • SEMA 2012- Eastwood Company Part 4 Coverage

    Getting noticed at SEMA is very important. Show cars, trucks, and motorcycles are there for only a couple reasons. Either to show off products the company sells or to draw attention and get foot traffic through their booth (this is a trade show after all!). Whatever the reason is, everyone is trying to a different approach to draw attention. If you want to figure out which cars or booths are the best at the show, all you need to do is look for crowds around a booth. There you'll find either an exceptionl car, a celebrity, or an attractive model; regardless you won't be disappointed if you take a peak.

    Shooting pictures of some of the high profile cars at SEMA is really tough. There's always crowds surrounding the cars and often people are so excited about checking the car out, they're oblivious to the line of photographers waiting for that small window when they can fire off a few shots of the car. I can tell you from personal experience, it takes a mix of patience, skill and luck! The custom ford above is a perfect example. It had the performance of a super car and the looks of a classic muscle car all blended together to create what I'd call a "retro super car". The crowds were relentless around this car and we had to make our way into the show early just to check it out beforehand.

    Then there were cars and booths that were built just for shock value to get the attention of the thousands of cameras in attendance. The typical formula for a busy booth is to get a vehicle with some flashy/shiny paint, lots of chrome, some giant wheels, and a beautiful model standing next to the vehicle. Hyundai and an artist teamed up to take this idea to the next level and they built a Zombie support vehicle out of a new Hyundai. They then employed some attractive (is that possible?) zombies to pose with the car and show-goers! This idea was pretty cool and timely for the SEMA show taking place around the Halloween holiday each year.

    Aside from the gimmicks and crowds, there were some really nice classic cars at the show. We tried to catch some of our favorites shown below in the Mopar display. They put together one of the nicest selections of Dodge, Plymouth, and Chrysler classics we've seen in a while! Check the rest of our favorites from this portion of the show in the gallery below.

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